Trich is mostly considered untreatable; there's not enough research into the mental, or neurophysiological mechanisms of action to really underpin the cause. I suspect it works in a similar way to any other addiction; a stimulus like a small amount of pain induces a dopamine response, a pleasurable feeling. After a while, your physiological urge for the dopamine hit overpowers your reasoning to stop.
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So you can look at balancing hormones by things like Menopause Support, have plenty of fermented soya foods in your diet. Look at things that maybe Black Cohosh as well, if they're appropriate. You could start to eat fermented soya foods, and these are foods that are eaten on a regular basis in the Far East, so it would be things like tempeh, and miso, and maybe some kinds of fermented tofu as well.  

Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
Beginning at perimenopause in their 40s, women may see the effects of menopause on hair, including thinning hair, dull, graying and hair loss. Experts previously thought hair loss due to menopause was caused by low estrogen levels. But new research shows that hair loss in older women is likely due to lower levels of both estrogen and progesterone, causing hair follicles to thin and hair to fall out.

When your hair thins at an early age it can lead to anxiety, self-esteem issues, and lowered satisfaction when it come to your personal appearance. Initially, many guys try to overcome this by wearing a baseball cap or looking for over-the-counter hair thickening shampoos. Some brave souls will accept their genetic fate and go completely bald – but that look doesn’t always work for everyone.
Hypothyroidism (an under-active thyroid) and the side effects of its related medications can cause hair loss, typically frontal, which is particularly associated with thinning of the outer third of the eyebrows (also seen with syphilis). Hyperthyroidism (an over-active thyroid) can also cause hair loss, which is parietal rather than frontal.[23][unreliable medical source?]
An unhealthy scalp environment can play a significant role in hair thinning by contributing to miniaturization or causing damage.[citation needed] Air and water pollutants[citation needed], environmental toxins,[citation needed] conventional styling products and excessive amounts of sebum have the potential to build up on the scalp.[citation needed]. This debris can block hair follicles and cause their deterioration and consequent miniaturization of hair.[citation needed]. It can also physically restrict hair growth or damage the hair cuticle[citation needed], leading to hair that is weakened and easily broken off before its natural lifecycle has ended.[citation needed]

I was drying my hair and I felt it. After pretending to be fine with it I cried a lot that night when I went to bed. I went to the resort doctor the next day and he informed me it was due to stress and not looking after myself properly. He was right, I was working every day and out having fun most nights. He informed me there was nothing I could do about it but wait for it to grow back and to look after myself and my diet.

There’s no single cause. Triggers range from medical conditions -- as many as 30 -- to stress and lifestyle factors, like what you eat. Your genes play a role, too. Sometimes doctors can’t find a specific reason. As a starting point, hair loss experts suggest you get tested for thyroid problems and hormone imbalances. Hair often grows back once the cause is addressed.
Hair Loss can be caused by both emotional and physical stresses such as a serious illness. It is possible that stress induces hormonal changes that are responsible for the hair loss. Genes play a vital role in hair loss , there are usually other reasons as well, including, hormonal imbalances, an under-active thyroid gland, nutritional deficiencies and insufficient blood circulation in the scalp. Hair loss is a mammoth problem that many people are suffering from.
A few years back, your hair was so thick that we could barely see your scalp. But these days, parting your hair leaves a noticeable gap that everyone can see. This is because you’ve lost some of the hair in your crown area, effectively losing some of your hair’s volume. The problem is that you never really know how much thinning is going to happen. For some men, it could just be a little bit of shedding. For others, their hair could continue thinning until there are large bald patches.
What can women do to treat it? As I note in my book, the first thing to do is to get a true diagnosis and find Dr. Right (for you). Women need to know that no stone has been left unturned. So the go-to person for hair loss is a dermatologist. Find a physician who is experienced in treating women’s hair loss. You should go there ready to tell the doc what’s been going on in your life--stress, recent pregnancy, severe weight loss due to dieting/anorexia/bulimia; current medications (over the counter and prescription), herbs, vitamins, birth control pills (start/stopping); HRT (start/stopping) and even habits such as wearing hair in tight buns, pony tails, corn rows etc. The physician should be able to tell if something is causing the hair loss and/or go on to a more definitive exam,which might include a scalp biopsy to rule out a fungus or other infection.
I started loosing of my hair at age of 16 only. I was loosing 30–70 hairs. I was worried about it. After my 12th exam I moved to Panipat, there also same thing was happening with my hair(college days). I was 22 when I came to Bangalore in 2015 for job search I realized that loosing 30–70 hair is normal. In two months of struggling period I lost 30% my hair (rate was higher this time). My hairline was receding but It was not noticeable to others. I went back to my home town for 1 months and my hair fall was stopped. I got my posting in Chennai. I was worried because I thought now i will loose more hair. After 5 months I came to bangalore again and I noticed hair fall rate in bangalore is more than chennai. I was very worried, after lot of research I finally thought to consult to dermatologist for PRP treatment. I consulted Dr, parth sarathi (MG road). I read about PRP treatment and it was impressive. Before that i tried livon hair gain also. OK.. Now coming to dermatologist part. He took my 40k (aprx) but nothing happened to my hair. I had gone through 3 PRP session also, applied topical solution of serums (suggested by doc). I lost more hair. Now I have very less hair on scalp. I can see my my bald scalp.
Treatment of pattern hair loss may simply involve accepting the condition.[3] Interventions that can be tried include the medications minoxidil (or finasteride) and hair transplant surgery.[4][5] Alopecia areata may be treated by steroid injections in the affected area, but these need to be frequently repeated to be effective.[3] Hair loss is a common problem.[3] Pattern hair loss by age 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females.[3] About 2% of people develop alopecia areata at some point in time.[3]
Oral Medication: “In cases of androgenetic alopecia, finasteride is still the gold standard,” says Fusco. (Finasteride is the generic version of Propecia, which can be prescribed by your dermatologist and is also available via mail subscriptions.) Fusco says that even younger men can slow or delay hair loss by starting a daily finasteride prescription. “This medication works by inhibiting an enzyme that leads to hair loss,” she notes. “In clinical trials, 90 percent of the patients either gained hair or maintained their hair over a five-year period.”
If you’re beginning to notice more of your hair clogging up the drain, it may be time to do a thorough assessment of the products you’re using on a daily or weekly basis. For starters, as previously mentioned, it might be a good idea to replace your standard shampoo with one that is strictly clarifying. While you’re in the shower, right after you’ve rinsed the conditioner out of your hair, stimulate hair growth by giving your scalp a quick 30-second massage. Finally, forego the stigma of Rogaine to reap the scientifically-proven benefits that are an easy addition to your morning routine.
Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
Stress is one of the major hair fall reasons. A hair follicle needs energy to grow. Coenzyme Q10, found in whole grains, fish and meat, boosts the scalp's ability to produce energy, especially in a cell's mitochondria or energy factory. Stress causes oxidation, harming Coenzyme Q10 among other anti-oxidants, thereby being one of the major contributors to the list of reasons for hair fall.

Too Much “Hair Care”: Believe it or not, hair loss can be caused by “over caring” for your hair or by certain cosmetic procedures. Shampooing too often, applying heat or braiding your hair tightly can cause damage to the hair follicles. Another cause of hair loss includes chemical processes like dying, bleaching, or perms. Typically, this is not a reason for baldness, though, and the hair will grow back.
Finasteride (Propecia) is used in male-pattern hair loss in a pill form, taken 1 milligram per day. It is not indicated for women and is not recommended in pregnant women. Treatment is effective starting within 6 weeks of treatment. Finasteride causes an increase in hair retention, the weight of hair, and some increase in regrowth. Side effects in about 2% of males, include decreased sex drive, erectile dysfunction, and ejaculatory dysfunction. Treatment should be continued as long as positive results occur. Once treatment is stopped, hair loss resumes.[30]
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