Hi Prithak, I wouldn’t focus too much on the number of hairs lost each day. Look at your hairline and hair thickness and see if it decreasing over time. At your age there is a lot you can do to keep your hair. For starters, I would recommend alkalising your body and removing foods that could cause you allergic reactions, leading to inflammation. Also make sure you don’t use any chemical shampoos or hot water on your hair. That’s a simple way to get started and protect your hair.
Take some time to read through our guide to female hair loss, which should give you an indication of what might be causing your problem and what you can do. You can contact The Belgravia Centre any time to arrange a free one-on-one consultation with a hair loss specialist. The good news is that most women’s hair loss conditions are treatable and can be prevented or reversed. Jump to more information on hair loss treatments for women. Please note that results may vary and are not guaranteed.
Any kind of physical trauma—surgery, a car accident, or a severe illness, even the flu—can cause temporary hair loss. This can trigger a type of hair loss called telogen effluvium. Hair has a programmed life cycle: a growth phase, rest phase and shedding phase. “When you have a really stressful event, it can shock the hair cycle, (pushing) more hair into the shedding phase,” explains Marc Glashofer, MD, a dermatologist in New York City. Hair loss often becomes noticeable three-to-six months after the trauma.
In fact, most of the women I spoke with would not accept the diagnosis of genetic hair loss. They would rather have an illness. If a cure could not be found, at least there was a reason beyond their control. A woman appearing without hair because of a cancer fight is brave. What about those of us who are just losing our hair? There is no place for us, so we hide in shame.
Anagen effluvium is rapid hair loss resulting from medical treatment, such as chemotherapy. These potent and fast-acting medications kill cancer cells, but they may also shut down hair follicle production in the scalp and other parts of the body. After chemotherapy ends, hair usually grows back on its own. Dermatologists can offer medication to help hair grow back more quickly.
After struggling with her own severe menopause symptoms and doing years of research, Ellen resolved to share what she learned from experts and her own trial and error. Her goal was to replace the confusion, embarrassment, and symptoms millions of women go through–before, during, and after menopause–with the medically sound solutions she discovered. Her passion to become a “sister” and confidant to all women fueled Ellen’s first book, Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness. As a result of the overwhelming response from her burgeoning audiences and followers’ requests for empowering information they could trust, Ellen’s weekly blog, Menopause MondaysTM, was born.

Mine has definitely thinned, but I am absolutely not willing to take drugs for it, or for any of the relatively minor issues that I’ve experienced. Although I do know men who have had great experience with hair drugs. Still, I don’t like putting more stuff into my body if I don’t have to. I’d like better hair, but my self-image doesn’t depend on it.
In addition to behavioral changes, Bauman says you can slow hair loss by taking routine nutritional supplements. He recommends a professional-grade Biotin, called Viviscal Professional or Nutrafol Men. “Nutrafol targets several possible triggers for hair loss and hair thinning, including inflammation, the effects of cortisol (stress hormones), free radical damage, and more.”   He also suggests using grooming products that contain caffeine (like Davines’ Energizing lineup), saw palmetto (Serenoa Repens) such as MiN New York daily shampoo, and green tea extracts (ECGC) like Paul Mitchell’s scalp care assortment. “These can help strengthen the follicles and help prevent shedding,” he says.
While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
Genetics is the most common reason for baldness, yes, but, according to this study in PLOS Genetics, it’s a more complicated process than we initially thought, and involves more than 280 genes. From this genetic map, researchers were able to determine which participants were in danger of losing their hair, and from those in the danger zone, about 20 percent could blame their mothers for such a predicament—not their father. Though, it is important to note that men and women lose their hair in very different ways. For men, the hair slowly begins receding at the temples, before eventually forming an M-shaped hairline, while women may notice a gradual widening of the scalp and thinning texture of their hair.
After struggling with her own severe menopause symptoms and doing years of research, Ellen resolved to share what she learned from experts and her own trial and error. Her goal was to replace the confusion, embarrassment, and symptoms millions of women go through–before, during, and after menopause–with the medically sound solutions she discovered. Her passion to become a “sister” and confidant to all women fueled Ellen’s first book, Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness. As a result of the overwhelming response from her burgeoning audiences and followers’ requests for empowering information they could trust, Ellen’s weekly blog, Menopause MondaysTM, was born.
Hair loss before, during or after menopause -- as well as after childbirth -- is commonly attributed to hormonal changes. And while most physicians agree that replacing these hormones can alleviate many of the other troubling symptoms of menopause, unfortunately, hormone replacement alone does not seem to radically alter a woman's "follicular fate," and can even sometimes make matters worse.

Another perhaps less-considered ailment causing hair loss for men and women in their 20s could be stress. The pressure on young people today to perform well at work and compete in busy UK markets can have a serious effect on long-term stress levels which in turn may cause premature hair loss. Highly-linked to stress is another condition called Trichotillomania whereby sufferers nervously pull out strands of hair repeatedly when they are under pressure.


Turns out I may be on to something. Research shows that if scalp massages are done with essential oils, including lavender, cedarwood, thyme, and rosemary (the latter being especially effective), they do indeed stimulate hair growth. Of course, the nice thing is, we don’t need to embarrass ourselves by making crazy requests to fancy hair salons (although, if the salon is fancy enough, of course, no request will be seen as crazy); we can give scalp massages to ourselves. And if your sleeping partner doesn’t care, or if you sleep by yourself, then for an additional benefit, you can do what I sometimes do, which is rub rosemary oil with coconut oil into my scalp before bed, and then sleep with it in my hair/head all night.

In men, finasteride (originally marketed as Proscar) is approved for hair loss associated with androgens. In one study, 62% of women also taking oral contraceptives containing the synthetic progestin drospirenone reported improvement. So it may be effective for female hair loss in the setting of increased androgen. But studies are limited and it is harmful to the male fetus so should not be used by women thinking about becoming pregnant or who are pregnant.


Hormones are often not the only things to blame when it comes to female hair loss. Several factors can be at play. If female hair loss runs in your family, you may be more likely to experience hair loss during menopause. Other hormonal imbalances, nutritional or iron deficiencies, medication, illness, conditions (like thyroid disease and anemia), diets, and surgeries can also contribute to hair loss.
When women have female pattern hair loss, the pattern of the shedding is completely different. While it is still located around the top of the head, it affects the vertex more diffusely, as opposed to being confined to defined areas. While thinning can certainly be significant, the chances of it forming noticeable bald areas are much less likely than with men. Instead, hair tends to look less voluminous than it once did, and the severity of the loss is recorded on something called the Ludwig Scale, which can be seen here.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is another imbalance in male and female sex hormones. An excess of androgens can lead to ovarian cysts, weight gain, a higher risk of diabetes, changes in your menstrual period, infertility, as well as hair thinning. Because male hormones are overrepresented in PCOS, women may also experience more hair on the face and body.

Minoxidil (Rogaine) is a nonprescription medication approved for male pattern baldness and alopecia areata. In a liquid or foam, it is rubbed into the scalp twice a day. Some people have an allergic reaction to the propylene glycol in the minoxidil solution and a minoxidil foam was developed without propylene glycol. Not all users will regrow hair. The longer the hair has stopped growing, the less likely minoxidil will regrow hair. Minoxidil is not effective for other causes of hair loss. Hair regrowth can take 1 to 6 months to begin. Treatment must be continued indefinitely. If the treatment is stopped, hair loss resumes. Any regrown hair and any hair susceptible to being lost, while Minoxidil was used, will be lost. Most frequent side effects are mild scalp irritation, allergic contact dermatitis, and unwanted hair in other parts of the body.[30]


About the coffee… mmmh, I’m not totally sure to be honest. Having never drunk coffee myself I haven’t researched and experimented on its effects, but yes something that is highly acidic is not going to help. Perhaps replacing it with green tea and filtered or bottled water would be a better alternative, or another tea that is high in antioxidants such as cold brewed hibiscus (which has more antioxidants than any other tea.)
I posted some pictures because I am not sure if I am loosing my hair. I have recently noticed some thining in the front and back but I am not sure if I am really loosing my hair or if it recently has just been looking different. I also notice when I stroke my hand through it a lot of strands are easy to pull out. What can I do? Progaine? Rogaine? I am 22. Thanks! READ MORE
Some women notice that their hair becomes thinner or patchy at menopause. For most women it's not as dramatic as male hair loss but it can be a very sensitive subject that can badly knock your confidence. The pattern in women tends of gradual thinning - maybe a more obvious scalp or a wider parting. Thinning can be seen on the top of the scalp as well as at the sides. Some women notice hair on their pillow, in the shower or it may come out in clumps while brushing.
An unhealthy scalp environment can play a significant role in hair thinning by contributing to miniaturization or causing damage.[citation needed] Air and water pollutants[citation needed], environmental toxins,[citation needed] conventional styling products and excessive amounts of sebum have the potential to build up on the scalp.[citation needed]. This debris can block hair follicles and cause their deterioration and consequent miniaturization of hair.[citation needed]. It can also physically restrict hair growth or damage the hair cuticle[citation needed], leading to hair that is weakened and easily broken off before its natural lifecycle has ended.[citation needed]

Similar to hitting the gym too often, restricting your diet in unhealthy ways can have severe consequences for your luscious locks. If you’re majorly restricting your daily calorie intake, this will slow down your metabolism and your bodily functions, including the growing cycle of your hair. Aside from that, your hair will be thirsty for those essential nutrients that it is no longer receiving. If you really must diet, start taking biotin supplements to maintain hair growth.
Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective means of treating hair loss. This level of approach includes several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent, though in addition women may turn to such techniques scalp massage in order to help stimulate hair follicles and regenerate hair growth. These can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require a greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.
Some men have a genuine fear of going bald and it can cause high stress levels, low self-esteem, reduced sex drive and even depression. But if you understand the causes and accept them you are much more likely to conquer these fears. Most men feel a momentary loss of confidence when they realise they are losing hair but this is often overcome quickly. The only way to ensure you won’t suffer psychological problems is to face up to the realities of baldness and either accept it or seek treatment that works for you. 

The association among food plus hair is simple. Hair is completed up of a protein call keratin. Therefore, it’s vital that you comprise enough protein in your diet. A low-protein diet orders your body to keep the accessible protein for extra purpose, like upgrading cells, therefore stingy hair of it. Green tea is valuable as it blocks out Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone which causes hair loss.
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Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.

Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.


Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like - if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size - with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.
Chronic Telogen Effluvium, also known as Diffuse Hair Loss, is similar to temporary Telogen Effluvium in its causes, the main difference being that hair loss can be prolonged. The reason for this is that the underlying cause of the hair loss has not been dealt with. In order to treat Chronic TE effectively it is important not only to treat the condition with an optimum course of treatment, but also to look at the medical issues causing the problem.
Adjusting to permanent hair loss is challenging for most women. Menopausal hair loss can be upsetting and cause anxiety, but is not usually a sign of an underlying medical disorder, unless accompanied by other symptoms. Improving general and nutritional health may help slow loss. There are cosmetic options for improving the appearance of hair and medical treatments which, when used long term can improve hair growth. If you have other symptoms as well as your hair loss, seek the advice of your doctor.
Beginning at perimenopause in their 40s, women may see the effects of menopause on hair, including thinning hair, dull, graying and hair loss. Experts previously thought hair loss due to menopause was caused by low estrogen levels. But new research shows that hair loss in older women is likely due to lower levels of both estrogen and progesterone, causing hair follicles to thin and hair to fall out.
After struggling with her own severe menopause symptoms and doing years of research, Ellen resolved to share what she learned from experts and her own trial and error. Her goal was to replace the confusion, embarrassment, and symptoms millions of women go through–before, during, and after menopause–with the medically sound solutions she discovered. Her passion to become a “sister” and confidant to all women fueled Ellen’s first book, Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness. As a result of the overwhelming response from her burgeoning audiences and followers’ requests for empowering information they could trust, Ellen’s weekly blog, Menopause MondaysTM, was born.

Female-pattern hair loss, called androgenic or androgenetic alopecia, is basically the female version of male pattern baldness. “If you come from a family where women started to have hair loss at a certain age, then you might be more prone to it,” says Dr. Glashofer. Unlike men, women don't tend to have a receding hairline, instead their part may widen and they may have noticeable thinning of hair. 

While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
Before you start hormone replacement therapy, it's important to talk to your doctor about the possible risks and negative effects versus the benefits of HRT. If you're already at an increased risk for health conditions like heart disease, cancer, and blood clots, HRT may not be the best hair loss treatment for you. If you are prescribed HRT, it important to take the lowest doses that are effective, and to only take the drugs for the shortest amount of time needed to control symptoms.
Devices that emit low-energy laser light may help new hair grow. They're available in some clinics and for home use. Several are approved for both men and women, and studies show they do work. But it might take 2-4 months before you see results. Keep in mind: The FDA doesn’t require the same rigorous testing for devices as for medicines. The long-term safety and effects aren’t known.
Side effects and concerns: Minoxidil is safe, but it can have unpleasant side effects even apart from the alcohol-related skin irritation. Sometimes the new hair differs in color and texture from surrounding hair. Another risk is hypertrichosis — excessive hair growth in the wrong places, such as the cheeks or forehead. (This problem is more likely with the stronger 5% solution.)
Going bald was one of the best things that ever happen to me. I thoroughly enjoyed finding hundreds of hairs on my pillow every morning and wads of hair clogging the shower drain. My wife loves it as much as I do and she loves kissing me on top of my smooth head. What a turn on! For me, male pattern baldness is a normal, natural inherited trait and not a disease in need of a cure. I have been bald for almost 20 years and I love it more than ever. Perhaps it’s because I lost hair later in life and married a woman who adores bald men like me.
And once a lustrous dark curtain, my hair had taken on an alarming transparent quality. I spent hours staring at my scalp in the mirror, parting and re-parting my hair to see which side looked fuller. I drenched my head with volumizing sprays, detoxifying tonics, and shampoos for "weakened hair." Remedies were thick on the ground—but my hair kept getting thinner. I was molting. And I was scared.
In last place on Dr. Guyuron's list of risk factors for hair loss are psychological stress and hormone imbalances. Stress is known to flood the body with hormones, he says, including some that block the action of a follicle-protecting enzyme called 5-a reductase. And when testosterone forms and then breaks down in the body, it can release "breakdown products" that have been tied to thinning hair.

My hair started thinning out . I saw my grandpa and my dad and thought, that won’t be me. It was pretty stressful and scary in my early 20’s but I found a ton of research with the help of this website I found. I wasn’t sure if Rogine was a good choice for me, then I saw the side effects and decided it definitely wasn’t. I hope you find some good advice with the website I did, Fullheadhelp.com, only $5, check it out.
In other words, no one’s truly safe from the condition. But even in the face of these seemingly insurmountable odds, not all hope is lost for your precious locks. To show your hair some TLC (and prevent further thinning), look out for these surprising culprits—and combat them accordingly. And if you need a quick way to mask any thinning hair, just check out the 15 Best Haircuts for Looking Instantly Younger.
Some things are harder to let go of than others. However, wisdom helps us nurture deeper feelings of self-esteem and a positive spirit. If you find that you are experiencing sudden hair loss, be sure to see your physician. In the meantime, get creative with a new fun style that can make your hair loss less noticeable.  It is not exactly “modern medicine”, but today we have access to hair extensions, clip-ons, scalp camouflages,  and oodles of accessories that can add the appearance of length and fullness without anyone knowing.
Before you venture into the confusing world of Internet hair loss advice, you should first pay a visit to a hair loss specialist. The doctor will sit down with you and discuss your family and medical history, then take a look at your hair loss and make a recommendation. The doctor might recommend one of the following treatment options for young males who are experiencing hair loss: 

For female hair loss in mid 20s, the findings are much the same; that if pattern hair loss runs in the family, the daughters are most certainly at risk too.  The other reason for hair loss in younger women is usually attributed to hormonal fluctuations, the trichological effects of which however could just be temporary. Speaking to your doctor if you feel that hormones, or hormone treatment is a concern, is advised. Hair loss in the 20s female tends to be diffuse, with an overall thinning of the hair occurring before wider areas of hair loss on the crown, if it progresses that far.


I too have spent 25 year researching what causes balding. I have found other reasons that cause balding that I believe to be true. The common link for all humans balding on the vertex of the head is the mandible is in a class 2 skeletal position. This causes the condyle to occlude the superficial temporal artery where it passes between the base of the skull and the condyle. In a normal healthy temporalmandibular joint, there is sufficient clearance for the superficial temporal artery. The skeletal class 2 position places the teeth, the mandible, the Ramos and the condyle in a retrognathic position. In conclusion, the dislocated class 2 skeletal jaw is functioning outside the glenoid fossa in a distalized position, towards the back of your head occluding on the superficial temporal artery. This causes the only connection the vertex follicle pad has to the body to be cut off ending the growth cycle of the hair follicle pad of the vertex.
Fair enough, I understand it. And I agree, some women love bald men. Guys like Jason Statham and Kelly Slater are heroes of mine and certainly don’t suffer in the romance department because of their lack of hair (Gisele Bundchen and Rosie Huntington-Whitely to name a few of their romances, and possibly two of the most beautiful women of earth.) However, losing hair at a younger age is clearly traumatic for some people, so this website is for them 🙂

Suffering from hair loss can be a disheartening and upsetting experience for most women. Unfortunately, during the menopause it can often occur due to plummeting levels of oestrogen and an increase in testosterone. In this page, our menopause expert Eileen Durward addresses why this unhappy symptom occurs and what herbal remedies can be used to encourage hair growth.

Follicles grow in cycles (growing – resting – falling out). Therefore, not all follicles grow at the same time and they have periods of rest. During the rest period the hair may remain in the follicle for some time or it may fall out. This cycle repeats itself for the whole of your life. It takes 8-12 weeks for a hair to grow from the base of the follicle to the surface of the skin. This means that if you remove a hair, you may have to wait 8-12 weeks for it to grow again. Hairs you see growing a few days later in the same area are from different follicles.
Vigorous styling and hair treatments over the years can cause your hair to fall out. Examples of extreme styling include tight braids, hair weaves or corn rows as well as chemical relaxers to straighten your hair, hot-oil treatments or any kind of harsh chemical or high heat. Because these practices can actually affect the hair root, your hair might not grow back.
I noticed I was going bald, I panicked and turned the internet upside down in search of a solution and tried lots of products and weird things but none worked. a friend who used to tease me about the hair (in a bid to tease me further) bought a product from Africa during his travels and he mockingly gave me as a present.I tried it and the result is unbelievable. infact he had to call his contacts in Africa to get in touch with the manufacturers. I know how frustrating and confidence-sapping being bald is that’s why I took this painstaking mission to reveal to any who wants to try it. you can contact the manufacturers on (abiomoigho@gmail.com)I hope this message helps.
Topical chemical treatments are used by many to help stimulate regrowth, although some believe that blood flow and circulation to old or weak hair follicles can be stimulated with only the fingertips and some common vitamin-rich items. Popular remedies for encouraging new hair follicle growth include combining a rich carrier oil like jojoba, coconut or olive oil with agents like vitamin-dense or mineral-dense aloe vera gel, potato juice, cinnamon, neem leaves or certain essential oils.
sick fractal donkey tail feat. a steamin hangover and leaves of a mystery #palm. #science march was chill n did some ~networking~, got cake w/ some pals, then let @deborahpowtattoos loose on my leg again. 🌱🌿🌵 its true, covering yourself in #tattoos won't make you suddenly love your body, but will slowly teach you empathy and understanding for yourself. reclaiming my body after years of self hatred is gonna be a long process, but at least i can jazz myself up ya know. (I know I've worn this jumper in every photo ok) (all this said i just got home to a letter from the community mental health team saying they can't help me) #plantscience #ayeforsci #sciencemarch #plantpower #me #bosypositivity #planthoarder
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald. 

I too have spent 25 year researching what causes balding. I have found other reasons that cause balding that I believe to be true. The common link for all humans balding on the vertex of the head is the mandible is in a class 2 skeletal position. This causes the condyle to occlude the superficial temporal artery where it passes between the base of the skull and the condyle. In a normal healthy temporalmandibular joint, there is sufficient clearance for the superficial temporal artery. The skeletal class 2 position places the teeth, the mandible, the Ramos and the condyle in a retrognathic position. In conclusion, the dislocated class 2 skeletal jaw is functioning outside the glenoid fossa in a distalized position, towards the back of your head occluding on the superficial temporal artery. This causes the only connection the vertex follicle pad has to the body to be cut off ending the growth cycle of the hair follicle pad of the vertex.
A medical event or condition, such as a thyroid imbalance, childbirth, surgery, or a fever, typically triggers this type of hair loss. Telogen effluvium may also occur as a result of a vitamin or mineral deficiency—iron deficiency is a common cause of hair loss in women—or the use of certain medications, such as isotretinoin, prescribed for acne, or warfarin, a blood thinner. Starting or stopping oral contraceptives (birth control pills) may also cause this type of hair loss.
Experts seem to agree that nobody needs to wash her hair every day. It’s not that washing our hair makes it fall out (though it may appear that way— we lose an average of 80 strands of hair a day, and it may seem that we lose all 80 of those strands in the shower when we’re shampooing in the morning), but experts say that what we do to our hair afterwards can damage it. For example, using blow dryers and curling irons on high heat settings, and extra-hold hair spray can all create hair loss.
Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.

Nine months ago, whilst blow drying my hair, I noticed a small circular bald patch on my left temple. I had no idea what it was and instantly called the doctors surgery hoping to book an appointment. I was told over the phone that it sounded like I had something called Alopecia and the doctor couldn't see me for a few weeks, but there's no cure, so I wasn't an urgent case compared to others.

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Common Mistakes to Avoid -- When it comes to hair loss, missing the early signs is one of the first mistakes many women make. A staggering 50 percent loss can occur before it's noticeable to the human eye. The other common mistake women (and men, for that matter) make when trying to treat their hair loss is not giving enough time for therapy to work and not tracking their results properly. Just like hair loss, initial changes in hair regrowth take time and can be subtle before they are noticeable to the naked eye.
While women accept that menopause is a natural and unavoidable stage of womanhood, coming to grips with its effects, especially with female hair loss due to menopause, can be very difficult. Often, hair loss is one of the first and more depressing symptoms of menopause that a woman notices and it can have a profound effect on her sense of femininity, sexuality and self-confidence.

Trich is mostly considered untreatable; there's not enough research into the mental, or neurophysiological mechanisms of action to really underpin the cause. I suspect it works in a similar way to any other addiction; a stimulus like a small amount of pain induces a dopamine response, a pleasurable feeling. After a while, your physiological urge for the dopamine hit overpowers your reasoning to stop.
It’s good to know that hair loss is a hereditary thing. My husband’s father has hair that is thinning out quickly, so I imagine that my husband will have a similar problem in the future. If that’s the case, then I should probably look into some preventative treatments to help him out. After all, the last thing I want is for my husband to start balding at age 40!
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