Hair transplant are a well-liked way to reinstate hair these days as the effects are totally natural-looking plus involve hair return using hair from the patient’s own head. Hair transplant can be performing on both men plus women moreover are only not possible if Alopecia Totalis has previously occurred (total hair loss throughout the death of the hair follicles).
Copyright © 2018 Leaf Group Ltd. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the LIVESTRONG.COM Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Copyright Policy. The material appearing on LIVESTRONG.COM is for educational use only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. LIVESTRONG is a registered trademark of the LIVESTRONG Foundation. The LIVESTRONG Foundation and LIVESTRONG.COM do not endorse any of the products or services that are advertised on the web site. Moreover, we do not select every advertiser or advertisement that appears on the web site-many of the advertisements are served by third party advertising companies.
Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like - if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size - with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.
The pull test helps to evaluate diffuse scalp hair loss. Gentle traction is exerted on a group of hairs (about 40–60) on three different areas of the scalp. The number of extracted hairs is counted and examined under a microscope. Normally, fewer than three hairs per area should come out with each pull. If more than ten hairs are obtained, the pull test is considered positive.[27]

Androgenetic alopecia, or AGA, is what you think of as male pattern baldness. Women can experience this phenomenon too. While men lose their hair in an M shape, women tend to lose hair all over. But in some cases, women also may lose hair more at the front of the hairline—right behind the bangs—and at the top of the scalp. The loss is gradual but can become apparent starting in your 20s. Your hair may also be thinner all over as well as at the front of your head.
For women going through menopause, the cause of hair loss is almost always related to hormonal changes. However, there are many other factors that can contribute to hair loss during menopause. These include extremely high levels of stress, illness, or a lack of certain nutrients. Diagnostic blood tests that can help rule out other causes of hair loss include thyroid tests, and/or a complete blood count.
I went to a lot of these sites trying to read about what was happening, and if I would go completely bald or if my hair would grow back. I never seemed to get any answers and it made me even more anxious about my life in general… worrying that I would be bald. I can assure you that if you commit to becoming a healthier person all around your hair will most likely stop falling out and go back to its original state. The most important thing is to STOP STRESSING, allow yourself and your body to heal and your hair will follow.
It’s important to keep your stress levels in check to prevent a hormonal imbalance. Reduced estrogen production can affect your brain chemistry and cause mood swings, anxiety, and depression. However, doing yoga and other breathing relaxation methods are especially effective in fighting menopausal symptoms. Exercising regularly can also help reduce stress.
Hair loss can start as soon as puberty ends, depending on your hereditary sensitivity to DHT. That phrasing is key: Bauman stresses that it is not DHT production that causes hair loss, it's the inherited sensitivity to DHT that causes the loss. Those with high sensitivity will be the first to experience a weakening in their follicles. This results in thinning around the crown and hairline, and lighter pigment in the hair. Behaviors that increase DHT production will magnify the loss depending on sensitivity. These behaviors include smoking, creatine supplements, resistance and weight training exercise, stress, and taking anabolic steroids or testosterone hormone replacement.
The benefit of having a thick head of hair is that the top of your head stays protected from UV rays. But once your hair starts thinning and you begin to lose that protection, you’ll find that your scalp is more susceptible to sunburn. If you’re not spending more time outdoors than usual and your scalp is becoming more sensitive to the sun, you could be losing some of your hair.
Research suggests that hair loss during menopause is caused by your female hormones declining, which in turn triggers the increased production of androgens (or male hormones). Androgens are the most common cause of hair loss in women, just like they are in men. Androgens can reduce the ability of your hair follicles, causing them to producer weaker hair until they eventually produce none at all. We call this type of hair loss androgentic alopecia or “female pattern baldness”.

Topical chemical treatments are used by many to help stimulate regrowth, although some believe that blood flow and circulation to old or weak hair follicles can be stimulated with only the fingertips and some common vitamin-rich items. Popular remedies for encouraging new hair follicle growth include combining a rich carrier oil like jojoba, coconut or olive oil with agents like vitamin-dense or mineral-dense aloe vera gel, potato juice, cinnamon, neem leaves or certain essential oils.
This is a hereditary condition that affects about 30 million American women, according to the America Academy of Dermatology, and is the most common kind of hair loss Rogers sees in her practice. She tells WebMD that it happens to about 50% of women. Although it mostly occurs in the late 50s or 60s, it can happen at any time, even during teenage years, Rogers says.
Just as pregnancy hormone changes can cause hair loss, so can switching or going off birth-control pills. This can also cause telogen effluvium, and it may be more likely if you have a family history of hair loss. The change in the hormonal balance that occurs at menopause may also have the same result. “The androgen (male hormone) receptors on the scalp becoming activated,” explains Mark Hammonds, MD, a dermatologist with Scott & White Clinic in Round Rock, Texas. “The hair follicles will miniaturize and then you start to lose more hair.”
Find a practice that suits your needs in terms of stress relief - swimming, meditating, communing with nature, reading or listening to music. Also look at ways to avoid exposure to stressful situations - where possible stay away from people and circumstances that raise your blood pressure. There are times when you need to walk away and breathe deeply! Stress can affect your ability to absorb and use the good nutrition that you may be consuming, particularly if you're living in a stressful way over a long period of time. You may need to make some small or big lifestyle adjustments and seek help and support from other people - friends or professionals. 

Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) restores post-menopausal oestrogen levels to average pre-menopausal levels. This reduces your risk of osteoporosis and alleviates menopausal symptoms, including hair thinning and/or loss. However, it is very important that you weigh the risks with the benefits. Studies have shown that HRT increases your chance of breast cancer, heart problems, mood swings, uterine cancer and endometriosis.
In males over 60, androgen receptor and aromatase levels were low and comparable in scalp with and without thinning in both frontal and occipital regions. The 5a -reductase type 1 and 2 levels were only slightly higher in males with thinning hair in both frontal and occipital regions, but the differences were not significant. Histologic and hormonal findings suggest that senescent thinning is a diffuse process that is histologically similar to Androgenetic Alopecia, but hormonally different and may not be entirely androgen dependent.

Beyond Hormones, Contributing Factors -- When it comes to menopausal hair loss, lower female hormones might be the most common culprit, but other contributing factors may need to be considered as well. These risk factors include genetic predisposition, unusual levels of stress, other hormonal imbalances -- like thyroid, for example -- nutritional or iron deficiencies, crash diets, as well as illness, medications and your surgical history. A detailed medical history and diagnostic tests are obtained as an important part of a medical hair-loss evaluation to identify risk factors.


According to psychologist Dr. Ana Fonseca, “For women, self-esteem and self-concept are the reflex of social influence, which can act as a source of conflict and misfit, with repercussions on body image and health. The relationship with the hair often includes anxiety about its general condition, if it’s thinning and falling out, or going gray. Hair is valued in connection with beauty and femininity, sexuality and attractiveness, so when losing it, people are affected negatively in their self-esteem and self-image. Hair loss threatens our vanity, how much we value ourselves and is usually seen as unattractive and often associated with being unwell or aging. It is recognized that there are also emotional factors associated with hair loss so it can mean psychological discomfort.”
Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia areata (mild – medium level) usually shows in unusual hair loss areas, e.g., eyebrows, backside of the head or above the ears, areas the male pattern baldness usually does not affect. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and hair either thins out or falls out. Female-pattern hair loss occurs at the frontal and parietal.
Hello Alex, I see no reason that those supplements would have made things worse. The only issue might be if the fish oil was oxidised before you consumed it, which can be common with some of the supplements (did you keep it in your fridge.) Anyway, even then I don’t think that could be the reason. Another possible answer is that the older (unhealthy) hairs are being replaced by healthier hairs, hence shedding. However, this probably isn’t the reason either. Your hair loss development is probably just continuing like normal with little affect from the supplements. Seeing a doctor might be a good idea as things will continue to get worse most likely. Please take a look at our Hair Equilibrium program and Grogenix product range. That’s probably how you’ll have most success getting your hair back.

Known as alopecia, hair loss occurs when hair follicles, or pores, either die or become slow in their ability to produce and push a protein called keratin through the follicle and, eventually, outside the skin. This often occurs naturally with age, although certain factors such as genetics, thyroid or hormonal conditions, side effects of medications, or other illnesses can affect hair cell production and growth. This often begins to appear as overall thinning or patchiness of the hair, or a recession of the hairline, usually starting at or around the temples.
Genetics is the most common reason for baldness, yes, but, according to this study in PLOS Genetics, it’s a more complicated process than we initially thought, and involves more than 280 genes. From this genetic map, researchers were able to determine which participants were in danger of losing their hair, and from those in the danger zone, about 20 percent could blame their mothers for such a predicament—not their father. Though, it is important to note that men and women lose their hair in very different ways. For men, the hair slowly begins receding at the temples, before eventually forming an M-shaped hairline, while women may notice a gradual widening of the scalp and thinning texture of their hair.
If hair loss is genetic or an autoimmune condition, available treatments night not be effective for regrowth, but there are hair systems that look like your own hair that can help. The hair is attached using surgical glue and the hair can be blow dried, dyed, straightened. You can swim, shower etc with it. While not your own hair, they can be truly wonderful. I met several young women who wore them and you couldn’t tell. Are they difficult to deal with? Yes. But at the very least they help. I interviewed several women who were fine with not covering their bald heads, but who felt compelled to do so for work and society in general. One woman, a teacher, told me she covered up because her student’s parents complained to the administration, concerned that she was ill.
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is another imbalance in male and female sex hormones. An excess of androgens can lead to ovarian cysts, weight gain, a higher risk of diabetes, changes in your menstrual period, infertility, as well as hair thinning. Because male hormones are overrepresented in PCOS, women may also experience more hair on the face and body.
I am 33 yrs old and just recently in the last 3 months I’ve noticed progressive hair loss near my crown and parts and my hair gets really oily like one day after I shower in my crown area. there is male pattern baldness in my family on my Dad’s side but none of the females on his side are affected. I have had a lot of emotional stress lately. I am worried that I have female pattern hair loss and it will be progressive. Can this be reversed esp at this young age if I make sure I’m nutritionally well and control my stress?

Oh my receding hairline is so tied to hormones! I lost my first batch of my thick, beautiful hair when I was pregnant and the next after my hysterectomy….I am still thinning and, you are right, it does seem to worse when I am stressed. It does change how I feel about myself. Thank you for, as usual, bringing great solutions and suggestions Ellen. I will definitely check some out!
If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), your hormones are always out of whack. Your body makes more male hormones, or androgen, than it should. This can cause extra hair to sprout on your face and body while the hair on your head thins out. PCOS can also lead to ovulation problems, acne, and weight gain. But sometimes thinning hair is the only obvious sign.

Yes, we’re all for the quick wash and rinse routine in the shower, but how much damage is this brevity doing to your hair? As it turns out, quite a bit. Aside from the leftover product residue, there are some of us who produce more Sebum, which naturally lubricates our skin. It’s what makes your shiny and greasy after a few days without a shampoo. If you’re a healthy adult experiencing hair loss, you can probably blame this occurrence on clogged hair follicles. The solution? Start using a clarifying shampoo two to three times a week. Be sure that the shampoo does not contain any conditioner, as this is the stuff that created the problem in the first place. And for more great hair care tips, check out the one haircut that will shave 10 years off your age.

The phases of your hair follicles rotate on different time intervals. Some follicles have shorter intervals than others, and research has never been able to pinpoint the cause for the discrepancy in phase time periods. Sometimes, hair follicles prematurely reach the telogen phase, resulting in hair loss. In other cases, follicles may reach this resting phase and never return to the anagen phase, meaning there is no new hair growth after the hair falls out.
Hair Loss can be caused by both emotional and physical stresses such as a serious illness. It is possible that stress induces hormonal changes that are responsible for the hair loss. Genes play a vital role in hair loss , there are usually other reasons as well, including, hormonal imbalances, an under-active thyroid gland, nutritional deficiencies and insufficient blood circulation in the scalp. Hair loss is a mammoth problem that many people are suffering from.
You’ve heard a million times and a million reasons why smoking is bad. Here’s another one for you. If you’d like to keep your glossy mane, it’s time to call it quits. According to research out of the University Hospital of Zurich, smoking causes “damage to DNA of the hair follicle, smoke-induced imbalance in the follicular protease/antiprotease systems controlling tissue remodeling during the hair growth cycle, pro-oxidant effects of smoking leading to the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines resulting in follicular micro-inflammation and fibrosis and finally increased hydroxylation of oestradiol as well as inhibition of the enzyme aromatase creating a relative hypo-oestrogenic state.” So, yeah, switch out your nasty habit for one that doesn’t mess with your body chemistry in such profound ways.
Yes, we’re all for the quick wash and rinse routine in the shower, but how much damage is this brevity doing to your hair? As it turns out, quite a bit. Aside from the leftover product residue, there are some of us who produce more Sebum, which naturally lubricates our skin. It’s what makes your shiny and greasy after a few days without a shampoo. If you’re a healthy adult experiencing hair loss, you can probably blame this occurrence on clogged hair follicles. The solution? Start using a clarifying shampoo two to three times a week. Be sure that the shampoo does not contain any conditioner, as this is the stuff that created the problem in the first place. And for more great hair care tips, check out the one haircut that will shave 10 years off your age.
Harmful lifestyle plus sure kinds of medications otherwise diseases can lead to hormonal imbalance in men. This inequity might trigger extreme secretion of DHT hormone. Consequently hair begins to fall off in droves. Superior testosterone is linked to hair loss. If you have genetic hair loss, what you inherit is hair follicles which enclose a senior sensitivity to DHT that is a hormone collected of single kind of testosterone.
Ahh this is so helpful and it makes a lot of sense! Thank you so much for this! I’ll definitely take all this on board! Honestly since my hair started thinning a few months ago I’ve been so panicked and confused as to why it was happening. I’m quite vain and I’ve always loved my hair so I’ve been really worried about keeping my curly locks! My friend actually recommended getting a wig made. Apparently you can have small pieces and extensions to cover up certain thinning parts of your hair without losing all your hair (and I’m definitely leaning towards this option). I read about a company called Optima Hair (they’re located near where I live), has anyone else used them? They look good but I don’t know much about it if I’m honest so I’d appreciate any advice or recommendations people could give me! x
Lack of sleep can push your body into a state of distress, which can actually halt hair growth. So, get some zzz’s and your hair will gladly thank you. According to Wellness Magazine, one out of every six Americans feel sleep-deprived. If your minimal sleep time is leaving you feeling exhausted, you can be sure that your hair follicles are feeling the same way.
If you are losing patches of hair in an apparently random manner you may have alopecia, a condition where a person (male or female) loses patches of hair from parts of their body. In extreme cases this may affect all of the hair on the body. Alopecia is thought to have hereditary and autoimmune factors (where the body mistakenly attacks itself). It is not the same as male pattern baldness.
You know, in this day and age, we can be really brutal with our hair, all these sprays, and heating tools, and hair dryers, and hair straighteners, so just watch what you're actually doing with your hair because if it's starting to get a little thinner and a little more brittle, then using a lot of these harsh treatments can speed up the deterioration process.  
Stress is one of the major hair fall reasons. A hair follicle needs energy to grow. Coenzyme Q10, found in whole grains, fish and meat, boosts the scalp's ability to produce energy, especially in a cell's mitochondria or energy factory. Stress causes oxidation, harming Coenzyme Q10 among other anti-oxidants, thereby being one of the major contributors to the list of reasons for hair fall.
×