I started loosing of my hair at age of 16 only. I was loosing 30–70 hairs. I was worried about it. After my 12th exam I moved to Panipat, there also same thing was happening with my hair(college days). I was 22 when I came to Bangalore in 2015 for job search I realized that loosing 30–70 hair is normal. In two months of struggling period I lost 30% my hair (rate was higher this time). My hairline was receding but It was not noticeable to others. I went back to my home town for 1 months and my hair fall was stopped. I got my posting in Chennai. I was worried because I thought now i will loose more hair. After 5 months I came to bangalore again and I noticed hair fall rate in bangalore is more than chennai. I was very worried, after lot of research I finally thought to consult to dermatologist for PRP treatment. I consulted Dr, parth sarathi (MG road). I read about PRP treatment and it was impressive. Before that i tried livon hair gain also. OK.. Now coming to dermatologist part. He took my 40k (aprx) but nothing happened to my hair. I had gone through 3 PRP session also, applied topical solution of serums (suggested by doc). I lost more hair. Now I have very less hair on scalp. I can see my my bald scalp.
The blame can't be blamed solely on your hair care habits, either—if there's baldness anywhere in your family tree, you're at risk. Unlike male-pattern baldness, though, where patches of hair fall out over time, female hair loss means a reduction in hair volume, making transplantation extremely difficult. "The total number of hairs doesn't always decrease, but the diameter of each strand shrinks," says Kingsley. And too-thin hairs won't grow past a certain length—which explains the baby fuzz around my hairline.
sick fractal donkey tail feat. a steamin hangover and leaves of a mystery #palm. #science march was chill n did some ~networking~, got cake w/ some pals, then let @deborahpowtattoos loose on my leg again. 🌱🌿🌵 its true, covering yourself in #tattoos won't make you suddenly love your body, but will slowly teach you empathy and understanding for yourself. reclaiming my body after years of self hatred is gonna be a long process, but at least i can jazz myself up ya know. (I know I've worn this jumper in every photo ok) (all this said i just got home to a letter from the community mental health team saying they can't help me) #plantscience #ayeforsci #sciencemarch #plantpower #me #bosypositivity #planthoarder

According to psychologist Dr. Ana Fonseca, “For women, self-esteem and self-concept are the reflex of social influence, which can act as a source of conflict and misfit, with repercussions on body image and health. The relationship with the hair often includes anxiety about its general condition, if it’s thinning and falling out, or going gray. Hair is valued in connection with beauty and femininity, sexuality and attractiveness, so when losing it, people are affected negatively in their self-esteem and self-image. Hair loss threatens our vanity, how much we value ourselves and is usually seen as unattractive and often associated with being unwell or aging. It is recognized that there are also emotional factors associated with hair loss so it can mean psychological discomfort.”

Trichotillomania, classified as an “impulse control disorder,” causes people to compulsively pull their hair out. “It’s sort of like a tic, the person is constantly playing and pulling their hair,” says Dr. Glashofer says. Unfortunately, this constant playing and pulling can actually strip your head of its natural protection: hair. Trichotillomania often begins before the age of 17 and is four times as common in women as in men.
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And when you do wash your hair, you might try using a shampoo meant for hair growth. Art Naturals Argan Oil Shampoo, for example, contains DHT blockers that are meant to prevent damage and further hair loss. It costs about $26 and has nearly 1,700 reviews with a 4.0 average on Amazon, and most users reported noticeable hair growth after only a couple of weeks.


After I had my first baby, I started getting post-partum hair shedding, which is totally normal. When you're pregnant you retain all your hair and it's shiny and thick and lovely, and then once you give birth it starts to shed. It can seem quite extreme because you haven't been shedding your hair naturally over time like you would when you're not pregnant, but it's totally normal. 

Extreme hair loss should be discussed with your healthcare practitioner. But in the case of mild to moderate thinning hair, which is usually a result of thyroid imbalance, hormonal imbalance, nutritional deficiencies, or elevated stress hormones, most women can get relief naturally — without having to resort to a new hair cut or experiment with hair thickening creams!
Iron supplements. Iron deficiency could be a cause of hair loss in some women . Your doctor may test your blood iron level, particularly if you're a vegetarian, have a history of anemia, or have heavy menstrual bleeding. If you do have iron deficiency, you will need to take a supplement and it may stop your hair loss. However, if your iron level is normal, taking extra iron will only cause side effects, such as stomach upset and constipation.
I have struggled with my hair for a long time now. I am quickly approaching my 40s and I have bad hair quality. Recently, I have also noticed that my hair has stopped growing as it used to. A few years ago I went to the salon on a monthly basis. Now, it takes me almost two months before I even need to cut my hair! I am desperate and I really need help right now. Hair is one of the most important parts of a woman and I don’t want to give up on this one. I went to the doctors but they didn’t found anything wrong with me. The exams I took showed that I am healthy and there’s no reason for this to even happen to me. Please, I really need hair advice urgently!!!!!!!!!!!!
Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
Minoxidil is the only medically-proven hair loss treatment suitable for women that has been shown to regrow hair and stop female pattern hair loss. Whilst it is licensed by the MHRA and approved by its US counterpart, the FDA for the treatment of genetic hair loss in both men and women, minoxidil is also known to be effective for other hair loss conditions.
About the coffee… mmmh, I’m not totally sure to be honest. Having never drunk coffee myself I haven’t researched and experimented on its effects, but yes something that is highly acidic is not going to help. Perhaps replacing it with green tea and filtered or bottled water would be a better alternative, or another tea that is high in antioxidants such as cold brewed hibiscus (which has more antioxidants than any other tea.)
Over the months to follow, I lost hair every day, whether it was in the shower coming out in handfuls or waking up with it all over my pillow. My parents and I tried everything to stop it, injections, steroid creams, immunologists, trichologists, dermatologists… a never ending stream of appointments which always resulted with the same answer -I had Alopecia, no one knew why, what it was from or how I could stop it.
I am 37 years old and for a long time I was slowly noticing a bald spot around the center of my far head. I think one reason may be because i do wear my hair up in ponytails all the time but recently it has gotten worse very quickly. I saw an article about the different medical reasons that cause hair loss but have been nervous to call and make a dr apt to talk to my dr. about all the bloodwork that was suggested to me. I am really starting to freak out because at 37 years old i am trying everything to try and cover the spots but I would love to correct it if there is a problem instead of just trying to hide it 🙁 I am starting to feel extremely self conscience and feel like I am gonna have to wear wigs or something before I am 40 🙁
Senescent thinning of the scalp hair, or thinning that occurs after age 60, is poorly understood, and it is unclear whether this is a distinct entity or part of the continuum of androgenetic alopecia (AGA).  In a previous study, young males age 18 to 30 with Androgenetic Alopecia had higher levels of 5a-reductase type 1 and 2, more androgen receptors, and lower levels of cytochrome P-450 aromatase in hair follicles in the frontal region of the scalp than in the occipital region.
Topical estrogen and progesterone creams and oral medications are generally the forms prescribed for post-menopausal women with androgenetic alopecia. But HRT will rarely, if ever, be prescribed for treatment of hair loss alone.] If you have other bothersome symptoms which might warrant HRT, in addition to hair loss, you'll first need to undergo a thorough gynecologic and physical exam, and will likely have blood tests done to measure hormone levels before these drugs are prescribed.
Terrible diet may not be the reason of what is strictly defined as “balding”. Though, lack of essential nutrients for example proteins, vitamins, keratin, plus minerals can guide to harsh hair fall which could report to baldness. Fair meals make sure good furnish of nutrients to hair follicles. Furthermore, healthy food suppresses hormones for example DHT. Dihydrotestosterone otherwise DHT is a hormone which plays a main role in causing hairlessness in men.

Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.


Women's hair loss is still so taboo because the socio-economic system we exist under puts unwarranted and unnecessary 'value' on physical appearance and social status, regardless of gender. Until we can liberate ourselves from this patriarchal and repressive system profiting from our insecurity, it will always be a taboo to stand out from 'the normal', which contributes to a lot of mental health problems across the board. 

What sometimes surprises women is that female pattern hair loss has the same cause as male pattern baldness: an inherited sensitivity to the testosterone-byproduct dihydrotestosterone (DHT). While men’s hair loss treatment for makes use of a clinically-proven drug named finasteride 1mg to block its production, this is not a suitable option for women.
For female hair loss in mid 20s, the findings are much the same; that if pattern hair loss runs in the family, the daughters are most certainly at risk too.  The other reason for hair loss in younger women is usually attributed to hormonal fluctuations, the trichological effects of which however could just be temporary. Speaking to your doctor if you feel that hormones, or hormone treatment is a concern, is advised. Hair loss in the 20s female tends to be diffuse, with an overall thinning of the hair occurring before wider areas of hair loss on the crown, if it progresses that far.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Traumas such as childbirth, major surgery, poisoning, and severe stress may cause a hair loss condition known as telogen effluvium,[19] in which a large number of hairs enter the resting phase at the same time, causing shedding and subsequent thinning. The condition also presents as a side effect of chemotherapy – while targeting dividing cancer cells, this treatment also affects hair’s growth phase with the result that almost 90% of hairs fall out soon after chemotherapy starts.[20]
Fashionista: What causes female hair to thin? Candace Hoffmann: There can be a number of reasons women lose hair. Female pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) is the most common. How do you know if this might be the reason for your hair loss? Look around at your family. If you have parents, relatives with thinning hair or who are frankly bald --male or female--there is a good chance you could have the propensity as well. That being said, for women, it’s not so cut and dry. Men can easily discern such a connection, women can have multiple reasons for hair loss--sometimes, it's temporary hair loss (telogen effluvium). Here are some common reasons for hair loss in women that are not genetic:
Too Much “Hair Care”: Believe it or not, hair loss can be caused by “over caring” for your hair or by certain cosmetic procedures. Shampooing too often, applying heat or braiding your hair tightly can cause damage to the hair follicles. Another cause of hair loss includes chemical processes like dying, bleaching, or perms. Typically, this is not a reason for baldness, though, and the hair will grow back.
This study in males age 60 years and older was designed to determine whether the histology and hormonal findings in older males with hair thinning are similar to Androgenetic Alopecia in young males. Males who experienced the first onset of scalp hair thinning after age 60 were compared to age-matched males (controls) without a history of hair thinning. Four scalp biopsies, two from the frontal and two from the occipital scalp, were obtained for horizontal sectioning and biochemical assay. Histologic findings were primarily follicular downsizing. Follicular drop out was not detected using elastic tissue staining, and there was no significant difference in number of follicles in frontal compared to occipital scalp. 

For female hair loss in mid 20s, the findings are much the same; that if pattern hair loss runs in the family, the daughters are most certainly at risk too.  The other reason for hair loss in younger women is usually attributed to hormonal fluctuations, the trichological effects of which however could just be temporary. Speaking to your doctor if you feel that hormones, or hormone treatment is a concern, is advised. Hair loss in the 20s female tends to be diffuse, with an overall thinning of the hair occurring before wider areas of hair loss on the crown, if it progresses that far.

Viviscal has Biotin in it — and calcium. And vitamin C. It also contains shark cartilage, oyster extract, and a “marine complex” — which is apparently the secret elixir that gives the ingredient its power. The U.S. National Library of Medicine published an article with a double-blind placebo controlled study that showed the efficacy of this product; “significantly more” women who took Viviscal than the placebo noticed hair growth after 90 days, and even more after 180 days. Now it’s true that the funding for the study was provided by the makers of Viviscal, but double-blind is double-blind. Furthermore, in an entirely separate article, Beauty Editor writer Katrina Persad tried Viviscal for 6 months and documented her results in a quite convincing photo essay and article that showed fairly dramatic results — and Viviscal (as far as I know) did not pay her for her trouble. (Though she does seem to have gotten the product for free, which is quite a perk; the tablets cost about $40 a month.)


This is probably the most common sign that your hair is starting to thin out. The receding hairline usually starts out as something small – maybe the hair around your temples gets a little bit thinner than the rest of your hair, or your forehead is a centimeter taller. At first, it’s not that big of a deal. But when you leave the receding hairline unchecked, it usually continues to grow until it creates a large M-shape pattern in the hair.
Going bald was one of the best things that ever happen to me. I thoroughly enjoyed finding hundreds of hairs on my pillow every morning and wads of hair clogging the shower drain. My wife loves it as much as I do and she loves kissing me on top of my smooth head. What a turn on! For me, male pattern baldness is a normal, natural inherited trait and not a disease in need of a cure. I have been bald for almost 20 years and I love it more than ever. Perhaps it’s because I lost hair later in life and married a woman who adores bald men like me.
While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
Some hair loss is associated with stress although male pattern baldness is a genetic condition found in many men. If you find your hair is falling out in clumps or at unpredictable times, it is most likely to be the symptom of something else. This could be stress related but is unlikely to be caused by sexual frustration. The best thing to do is to see your GP for a check up.
One of the most common yet least talked about symptoms of menopause, hair loss can be devastating for the millions of women who suffer from it. Americans spend upwards of a billion dollars per year on hair loss treatments. According to the American Hair Loss Society, 99% of these treatments are unfortunately ineffective. Most women do not want to sit back and let their hair fall out slowly without taking action. Luckily, there are alternative solutions that are safe and effective for the multitudes of women experiencing hair loss.
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
Ahh this is so helpful and it makes a lot of sense! Thank you so much for this! I’ll definitely take all this on board! Honestly since my hair started thinning a few months ago I’ve been so panicked and confused as to why it was happening. I’m quite vain and I’ve always loved my hair so I’ve been really worried about keeping my curly locks! My friend actually recommended getting a wig made. Apparently you can have small pieces and extensions to cover up certain thinning parts of your hair without losing all your hair (and I’m definitely leaning towards this option). I read about a company called Optima Hair (they’re located near where I live), has anyone else used them? They look good but I don’t know much about it if I’m honest so I’d appreciate any advice or recommendations people could give me! x

Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.

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