While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
Hair loss is a pretty tricky topic and most experts and doctors are never really able to pinpoint the cause. However, if you are looking to reduce your chance of hair loss or slow hair loss that is already progressing, you should consider the factors listed above. Your doctor may help you determine if a hormone imbalance or other medical condition may be the cause of your premature hair loss. If so, they may suggest hormone therapy, diet changes or other medications and treatments to help manage to condition or balance your hormones, which may naturally solve your hair loss problem.
A new medication can bring about a whole host of changes to your body—while also affecting the rate at which hair grows on your entire body. Certain medications can lead to two types of hair loss: telogen effluvium and anagen effluvium. Telogen effluvium can begin to take effect within the first two to four months after taking a new medication. If you notice more hair loss than usual, notify your doctor immediately to save your most prized possession from further damage. The second type of hair loss, anagen effluvium, is most common in cancer patients receiving regular doses of chemotherapy. This type of hair loss prevents your matrix cells from producing new hair altogether, meaning that you may lose hair on other parts of your body as well. And for more ways to make the most of your mane, check out these 15 Top Hair Tips from Top Hollywood Stylists.
Alright everyone, try things in cycles of at least 4 weeks or so, then you will have the ability to notice what works for your hair and what does not.  Hopefully some of these tips will flow into your hair care regimen leading your thinning hair to blossom to its full potential.  For most of us this will not happen overnight (or in a week).  Don’t forget – Patience is a virtue, but it also means you have to wait!  Concentrate on doing the right things with your hair now, it will definitely pay off later!  Happy hair growing!!!
Another of the key clues is a feeling that the hair is not as thick as usual – for instance when putting the hair into a ponytail, it may seem less dense. Although this may make it difficult for any obvious changes to be observed, many women intuitively know when something is different – and this would be a good time to see a hair loss expert to ascertain exactly what is going on.
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder also known as "spot baldness" that can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis). Although thought to be caused by hair follicles becoming dormant, what triggers alopecia areata is not known. In most cases the condition corrects itself, but it can also spread to the entire scalp (alopecia totalis) or to the entire body (alopecia universalis).
Hair loss can be hereditary. Hereditary hair loss is call androgenetic alopecia, otherwise for males, for females, male pattern baldness female pattern baldness. Androgenetic alopecia occurs once a hair follicle sheds, plus the hair which replaces it is thinner plus finer than what was there formerly. The hair follicles carry on to shrink plus finally hair stops growing in total. Still, opposing to accepted belief, inborn hair loss is not only innate from the maternal side, it can be agreed down from also the mother’s otherwise father’s genes – however is extra likely to happen if both parents have this matter.
It seems more than a little unfair, doesn’t it? You’d think the one thing we could count on was that hair loss or male or female pattern balding was an older person’s game. No way would hair loss occur as early as the mid 20s, right? Well, unfortunately for some of us, we may start seeing hair loss as early as our late teens and 20s, making for a very distressing discovery so soon after finishing school. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30 and there are a great many theories as to why hair loss in mid 20s might happen.
Follicles grow in cycles (growing – resting – falling out). Therefore, not all follicles grow at the same time and they have periods of rest. During the rest period the hair may remain in the follicle for some time or it may fall out. This cycle repeats itself for the whole of your life. It takes 8-12 weeks for a hair to grow from the base of the follicle to the surface of the skin. This means that if you remove a hair, you may have to wait 8-12 weeks for it to grow again. Hairs you see growing a few days later in the same area are from different follicles.

For women going through menopause, the cause of hair loss is almost always related to hormonal changes. However, there are many other factors that can contribute to hair loss during menopause. These include extremely high levels of stress, illness, or a lack of certain nutrients. Diagnostic blood tests that can help rule out other causes of hair loss include thyroid tests, and/or a complete blood count.

Finasteride (Propecia) is a medicine taken in tablet form that partially blocks the effects of the male hormones (an 'anti-androgen'). Propecia has been shown to halt further hair loss and promote re-growth of scalp hair in approximately 80 per cent of patients after three to six months. The treatment benefits also stop when you stop taking the medication. Only available on prescription and is available on some NHS primary care trust lists for certain conditions.
Reacting strongly to menopause hair loss can be seen as vanity – but it most definitely is not. Menopause hair loss can lead to depression, anxiety and low self esteem, but don’t worry you are not alone! If you can take the time to think about what you eat and whether you are getting enough vitamins and minerals into your diet along with a few housekeeping rules, you can help to alleviate this symptom.
Also new is the HairMax Laser Comb. It's a red light therapy hairbrush-like device that increases circulation and the biological march that makes hair. It's only approved in men (though some women are using it) and in my experience, is not as good as minoxidil. But in one study, 45% of users reported improvement after eight weeks, and 90% saw improvement after 16 weeks.
My age is 20 ... I have excessive hairloss for over an year... 2 years ago I had full head of hair... But now I notice that I'm going bald..!!! My father is also bald.. My uncles are bald too.... I know my hairfall is for family reason... I don't want to become bald.. What can I do??? Which type of treatment should I take ???? Plzz help... READ MORE
Reducing your stress should be your number one priority as it sounds like this could have been the original trigger. If you feel like your scalp is greasy then this could be to do with your diet. Take account of what you eat and try to remove fried foods or any foods containing vegetable oils. Processed foods in general should be avoided ideally. Seeing a doctor to find out what kind of hair loss yours is, is a good first step. Then you’ll be able to find the right treatment for it.
I noticed I was going bald, I panicked and turned the internet upside down in search of a solution and tried lots of products and weird things but none worked. a friend who used to tease me about the hair (in a bid to tease me further) bought a product from Africa during his travels and he mockingly gave me as a present.I tried it and the result is unbelievable. infact he had to call his contacts in Africa to get in touch with the manufacturers. I know how frustrating and confidence-sapping being bald is that’s why I took this painstaking mission to reveal to any who wants to try it. you can contact the manufacturers on (abiomoigho@gmail.com)I hope this message helps.
Fusco says that there’s something called miniaturization happening at the follicular level when a hair falls out. “Miniaturization refers to the slow shrinking of the hair follicle and the diminution of the hair within, until eventually the follicle no longer exists,” she says. “The remaining tiny hair falls out and nothing grows back.” She says that this is often genetic and caused by a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is a byproduct of testosterone. DHT clings to the follicle and then slowly shrinks it. This most commonly happens at the temples, the crown, and the front of the head. (This is also why you don’t see guys losing their hair around the sides and back.)

This is a hereditary condition that affects about 30 million American women, according to the America Academy of Dermatology, and is the most common kind of hair loss Rogers sees in her practice. She tells WebMD that it happens to about 50% of women. Although it mostly occurs in the late 50s or 60s, it can happen at any time, even during teenage years, Rogers says.
There's a chance you're genetically predisposed to hair thinning, which means you may see a progressive, gradual reduction in hair volume. "In these instances, certain hair follicles are sensitive to male hormones – and this sensitivity causes follicles to gradually shrink and produce slightly finer and shorter hairs with each passing hair growth cycle." Explains Anabel.
It seems more than a little unfair, doesn’t it? You’d think the one thing we could count on was that hair loss or male or female pattern balding was an older person’s game. No way would hair loss occur as early as the mid 20s, right? Well, unfortunately for some of us, we may start seeing hair loss as early as our late teens and 20s, making for a very distressing discovery so soon after finishing school. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30 and there are a great many theories as to why hair loss in mid 20s might happen.
Thinning hair can be annoyingly unpleasant. Especially when it starts at your temples, and simple things like putting your hair up in a ponytail become a matter of concern. Temple hair loss in females is common and dealing with it can be quite hard, but understanding hair loss and its causes can tremendously help find a solution. Keep reading to find out what causes hair loss at the temples and how you can regrow temple hair naturally.
When several of my classmates back in my senior year of college went bald (one went bald in about one year) I couldn’t believe my reaction. I was envious. Unbelievably, I wanted to go bald. I wanted to lose all my hair from the top of my head, leaving just a fringe on the sides and back: male pattern baldness. I had no idea guys still in their early 20s could go bald and I was shocked. I couldn’t wait for it to happen to me. I tried to shake off the urge, but had to finally admit to myself that male pattern baldness was I really, really wanted. But not until after I was married. I was afraid that no woman would want me if I was bald. Back then, I had no idea that there are women out there who actually prefer bald men. Lucky for me, I’m married to one of those women. When my wish finally came true in my early 50s, my wife was thrilled and she urged me to just let myself go bald. I did, and it happened very quickly, as if to make up for lost time. After only two years of finding hundreds of hairs on my pillow each morning and wads of my hair plugging our shower drain I was finally bald, male pattern bald. The rapid transition to bald was a very pleasant experience for both my wife and me and I absolutely LOVE being bald. My wife loves it too and still tells me how sexy she thinks it is. I love it when she kisses me on top of my shiny bald head. What a turn on! Going bald was one of the best things that ever happened to me. I just wish it had happened immediately after my wife and I were married, 40 years ago. I wish I had started shedding hair off the top of my head on our honeymoon and had been bald by our second wedding anniversary.
Research is looking into connections between hair loss and other health issues. While there has been speculation about a connection between early-onset male pattern hair loss and heart disease, a review of articles from 1954 to 1999 found no conclusive connection between baldness and coronary artery disease. The dermatologists who conducted the review suggested further study was needed.[41] 

I found out I have PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) coupled with insulin resistance, which were the causes of the hair loss. This was over 12 years ago and unfortunately for me not much was known about the condition, which affects so many women. All the GPs and specialists I saw were middle aged men, who were dismissive and often clueless about what was going on. I was told there was really not much to be done, and put on the pill which was supposed to balance things out. At one point I was even told not to worry over something as trivial as hair loss.
I’m 23 years old and since I was 20 I realized I have a mild form of diffuse thinning hair (which by now, 3 years later has become a little bit worse). Ever since then I’ve been using Minoxidil being an on and off user due to the side effects I get, mostly dark circles under my eyes and bad facial skin. At the moment I m struggling finding the right dose, but the problem is that when I’m getting very good results I m also getting noticeable side effects and when I’m getting just small hair regrowth results I m also getting no side effects. The problem is that I’ve been looking for the past weeks for a solution to get good results and no side effects. I have finally found your website.
The relationship between food and hair is simple. Hair is made up of a protein called keratin. So, it's essential that you include sufficient protein in your diet. A low-protein diet forces your body to save the available protein for other purposes, like rebuilding cells, thus depriving hair of it. Dr Shah says spinach, almonds, walnuts, paneer, tofu and milk are hair-happy foods. Green tea is effective because it blocks out Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone that causes hair loss.
The Best Method to Regrow Hair on the Crown Propecia Vs. Saw Palmetto How to Regrow Hair on a Receding Hairline Alopecia Treatments That Work for African American Hair Loss Ketoconazole for Hair Loss How to Get Thicker Hair for Men The Best DHT Shampoos Active Ingredients in Selsun Blue Effectiveness of Rogaine Nioxin Side Effects I'm Losing Hair in the Front Paul Mitchell Tea Tree Oil Shampoo Information Can You Use Both Minoxidil & Saw Palmetto for Hair Loss? Traction Alopecia Treatments LATISSE as a Treatment for Thinning Hair Does Laser Hair Restoration Work? Dangers of Rogaine for Women Can Olive Oil & Baking Soda Promote Hair Growth? How to Treat Menopause-Related Hair Loss Rogaine & Pregnancy
A few years back, your hair was so thick that we could barely see your scalp. But these days, parting your hair leaves a noticeable gap that everyone can see. This is because you’ve lost some of the hair in your crown area, effectively losing some of your hair’s volume. The problem is that you never really know how much thinning is going to happen. For some men, it could just be a little bit of shedding. For others, their hair could continue thinning until there are large bald patches.
Chris Deoudes has been a fitness writer since 2006, with articles published at Bodybuilding.com and Avant Labs. He is certified as a personal trainer by the American Council on Exercise and as a performance sport nutrition specialist by the International Sports Sciences Association. He has a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice and business management from the University of Florida.
While hair loss isn’t the most common symptom of anemia caused by an iron deficiency, there are still a number of people suffering from this predicament. According to a study in the Journal of Korean Medical Science, those affected by this specific type of hair loss can experience symptoms for a number of years. Since iron plays a crucial role in producing hemoglobin, a compound that carries oxygen to cells, this can mess with your body’s ability to carry out essential processes like hair and nail growth. You can make up for this deficiency by upping your protein intake, or by taking iron supplements—though you should talk to a doctor before doing this. And for more on the essential nutrients you may need, check out these 50 Best Supplements on the Planet.

If you find yourself snacking at night before bed, it may be because you're bored or anxious — not truly hungry — and eating makes you feel better. Try eating a healthy dinner a bit later in the evening. If your stomach is truly growling before bed, try a protein-based snack like a hard-boiled egg or a slice of cheese. A few spoonfuls of yogurt or some fruit is another good option. 
Thanks for sharing this..actually i am suffering from this problem last 3 years. After reading your blog I get a solution to rescue from hair fall. I will definitely try it…Parijatak Ayurveda provides plans for a wide range of ailments, thus spreading the magic of this traditional mode of treatment to each one. Parijatak also provides treatment for Tips for hair loss. nowadays hair loss related problem gets more increased, so we have to care about that.
Yes, the frontal hair loss is more as compared to other sides, but I can notice thin hair on sides and back too. Now, I can see my scalp easily when I comb, this shows that hair is thinning and falling from other sides too, I would say it’s androgenetic alopecia because I am losing hair from temples and the hair line is also receding. My scalp feels itchy from nearly 5 years and my hair fall problem started nearly 18 months ago…
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