Women expect hot flashes and mood swings to occur during "the change," but many women are unaware and unprepared for the fact that they may also find themselves facing hair loss and thinning during this time as well. After menopause, about 40 percent of women experience hair thinning, which is almost the same rate as men. But if this is true, why don't we see bald women on the street? Unlike male pattern hair loss, hereditary hair loss in women is usually a lot subtler and it can be easy to miss the early warning signs. Women tend to experience thinning over a wide area of scalp, and for many, the first signs and symptoms may come in the form of a smaller ponytail, a wider part line or excessive shedding during brushing and showering.
Just because hair loss is a visible condition doesn’t mean that you’ll see it right away. In fact, people often don’t notice that they are experience hair loss until half of the process has occurred. It’s important to keep an eye on the following symptoms so that you can treat the condition as early as possible. The earlier you treat hair loss, the better your results will be. Here are a few common female hair loss symptoms:
Nowadays, it has become analytical of concerns which are extra serious. Too much hair fall is a main symptom representing alopecia. Unnecessary to say that a strong diet plus lifestyle will perform to you moreover your hair follicles good on the other hand it’s vital to get an ultimate appraisal of your hair loss in order that any option you build in terms of action will be the greatest one for you long-term. Easy lifestyle changes for example receiving 7 hours of sleep, having a glass of water each hour are very important. You have to know that strands are made up of minerals that only water can refill) moreover consuming protein-rich foods at normal intervals can bring a propos an 80 per cent change.

Menopause is a natural biological process that all women experience at some point in their lives. During this time, the body goes through numerous physical changes as it adjusts to fluctuating hormone levels. Many women have unpleasant symptoms during menopause, including hot flashes, mood swings, and insomnia. Hair loss is another common occurrence. 

One-fifth of men will experience significant hair loss by age of 20(!), and that percentage grows proportional to age. Bauman says that significant loss increases steadily with age: 30 percent will experience it in their 30s, 40 percent in 40s, and so on. “This math proves true for men into their 90s,” he says. “If you go unchecked but have maintained most of your hair by middle age, then your sensitivity to DHT is probably on the low side, meaning you have a slower rate of male pattern hair loss going on.”

Beginning at perimenopause in their 40s, women may see the effects of menopause on hair, including thinning hair, dull, graying and hair loss. Experts previously thought hair loss due to menopause was caused by low estrogen levels. But new research shows that hair loss in older women is likely due to lower levels of both estrogen and progesterone, causing hair follicles to thin and hair to fall out.


Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time.
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
Reducing your stress should be your number one priority as it sounds like this could have been the original trigger. If you feel like your scalp is greasy then this could be to do with your diet. Take account of what you eat and try to remove fried foods or any foods containing vegetable oils. Processed foods in general should be avoided ideally. Seeing a doctor to find out what kind of hair loss yours is, is a good first step. Then you’ll be able to find the right treatment for it.
Some hair loss is associated with stress although male pattern baldness is a genetic condition found in many men. If you find your hair is falling out in clumps or at unpredictable times, it is most likely to be the symptom of something else. This could be stress related but is unlikely to be caused by sexual frustration. The best thing to do is to see your GP for a check up.
I am a 20 year old male, and I suffered severe hair loss for the past eighteen months. The hair loss was not specific to any area of my scalp, but i noticed a marked decrease in my hair density. Any of my immediate family members never showed signs of balding before 55 years of age. My hair loss has stopped now, and it is under control with me losing not more than 5-8 hair strands a day. I... READ MORE
As for me, thanks to two years of regular treatment, I've finally reached the phase where regrowth is thicker every day. But the process has been arduous and pricey: Rogaine requires diligent use and $30 a month for the rest of my life. And some of my hormone-regulating prescriptions that I credit most for my good results—like Avodart, that cost upwards of $200 a month—are not covered because if you take them while pregnant, they can harm the fetus's development. But I continue with my regimen because, for me, the risk is worth the remedy—I'm not planning on pregnancy for a long, long time anyway. I also figure it'll be a lot easier to find a potential father with a full head of hair.
For female hair loss in mid 20s, the findings are much the same; that if pattern hair loss runs in the family, the daughters are most certainly at risk too.  The other reason for hair loss in younger women is usually attributed to hormonal fluctuations, the trichological effects of which however could just be temporary. Speaking to your doctor if you feel that hormones, or hormone treatment is a concern, is advised. Hair loss in the 20s female tends to be diffuse, with an overall thinning of the hair occurring before wider areas of hair loss on the crown, if it progresses that far.
Finasteride (Propecia) is used in male-pattern hair loss in a pill form, taken 1 milligram per day. It is not indicated for women and is not recommended in pregnant women. Treatment is effective starting within 6 weeks of treatment. Finasteride causes an increase in hair retention, the weight of hair, and some increase in regrowth. Side effects in about 2% of males, include decreased sex drive, erectile dysfunction, and ejaculatory dysfunction. Treatment should be continued as long as positive results occur. Once treatment is stopped, hair loss resumes.[30]
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