Some men have a genuine fear of going bald and it can cause high stress levels, low self-esteem, reduced sex drive and even depression. But if you understand the causes and accept them you are much more likely to conquer these fears. Most men feel a momentary loss of confidence when they realise they are losing hair but this is often overcome quickly. The only way to ensure you won’t suffer psychological problems is to face up to the realities of baldness and either accept it or seek treatment that works for you.
Men often first notice hair loss on the temple area or on the hair line. Many refer to this as a "receding hair line." While this is not necessarily the beginning of progressive male pattern baldness, it can be distressing. It can also be very confusing sorting through hundreds of hair loss products and misinformation on the topic. Although it can be moderately challenging to regrow temple hair, it can be done and there is an additional permanent option if you are unsuccessful.

Hair loss affects over 60% of men before the age of 30. Some men begin to experience hair loss, commonly a result of male pattern baldness, in their late teens or early twenties. If you have recently looked in the mirror to discover you have thinning, balding patches of hair or a receding hairline, you may be suffering from male pattern baldness or another condition that’s causing your hair loss. Hair loss is not entirely understood by researchers, though, so slowing balding and regenerating hair growth can sometimes be a guessing game. There are options, though, for young men who experience mild to severe hair loss. You should start by trying to understand the cause of your baldness to help you decide which treatment (or lifestyle changes) may work for you.
When your hormones are out of step, your hair truly suffers. In a study in the International Journal of Women’s Dermatology, researchers found that birth control can cause a relative increase in androgen levels that then causes a corresponding increase in DHT production, which researchers believe shrinks the hair follicle. If you want to be on birth control but have a predisposition for genetic hair loss in your family, researchers suggest steering clear of birth controls that release higher amounts of estrogen and progestin like progestin implants, hormone injections, skin patches, and vaginal rings.
Fair enough, I understand it. And I agree, some women love bald men. Guys like Jason Statham and Kelly Slater are heroes of mine and certainly don’t suffer in the romance department because of their lack of hair (Gisele Bundchen and Rosie Huntington-Whitely to name a few of their romances, and possibly two of the most beautiful women of earth.) However, losing hair at a younger age is clearly traumatic for some people, so this website is for them 🙂
Ask your stylist. She might suggest a short cut, a different part, maybe a gentle body wave. Try a styling product for thin hair to hide bare spots. Apply it to the root area then gently blow dry to build volume. Let your hair air dry for a while before you use the dryer. Special cosmetics can disguise parts of your scalp that show. Think about keratin fiber hair cosmetics. Sprinkle them over the thinning patch. Their static charge makes hair look thicker.
This is what I have been waiting for, I cannot and will not vote conservative again and Liebour is totally out of the question. If Nigel is true to his word, and I dont doubt him, then I will have a place for my vote, as will many others. We voted out and the arrogant political elite have taken our vote and trampled on it, they never did want to leave the corrupt EU and have done everything in their power to make sure we dont, with little or no regard for democracy.
A medical event or condition, such as a thyroid imbalance, childbirth, surgery, or a fever, typically triggers this type of hair loss. Telogen effluvium may also occur as a result of a vitamin or mineral deficiency—iron deficiency is a common cause of hair loss in women—or the use of certain medications, such as isotretinoin, prescribed for acne, or warfarin, a blood thinner. Starting or stopping oral contraceptives (birth control pills) may also cause this type of hair loss.
The directions say patients will see an improvement in hair growth in six weeks, but Dr. Mirmirani suggested trying it for six months before deciding whether it works or not. About a third of patients who use it see significant improvements, another third find it prevents hair loss from getting worse, and the remainder don’t see any effect, she said.
My hair has become slightly thicker in recent years due to trying out some other medications, and I have recently started using Regaine foam for women. I've had to come to terms with the fact I will never have thick hair, but it still gets me down now and then, especially when I go through periods of stress and it thins again. I found that about 6 months after I was hospitalised whilst travelling in Africa, and after the 2015 earthquake in Nepal (I was a volunteer there at the time) my hair suddenly thinned again, which is apparently common after traumatic events.

Thick, healthy hair is a sign of youth, good health, and beauty. It can be devastating to watch your hair fall out, not just because you might feel like you’re losing your younger self, but also because you may worry that something even more serious is going on with your body. As women, we understand that thinning hair or outright hair loss is more than just a cosmetic concern. Besides being so important to self-esteem, your hair is a reflection of your overall health picture — especially your thyroid health.
I found out I have PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) coupled with insulin resistance, which were the causes of the hair loss. This was over 12 years ago and unfortunately for me not much was known about the condition, which affects so many women. All the GPs and specialists I saw were middle aged men, who were dismissive and often clueless about what was going on. I was told there was really not much to be done, and put on the pill which was supposed to balance things out. At one point I was even told not to worry over something as trivial as hair loss.
Hi Will. I have a question regarding on my hair loss problem. Currently, I’m still on my 19 but I already have that M-shaped on my hairline which is really absurd and devastating for me. I met a doctor one month ago and he prescribed me with ketoconazole shampoo. The result is quite impressive as my hair didn’t feel itchy anymore. The thing is, the hair on my hairline is still not growing as much as the other parts of my head but the fine hair didn’t fall out. Is it going to be like that or is there anything that I should consider to make it grow back?
Fair enough, I understand it. And I agree, some women love bald men. Guys like Jason Statham and Kelly Slater are heroes of mine and certainly don’t suffer in the romance department because of their lack of hair (Gisele Bundchen and Rosie Huntington-Whitely to name a few of their romances, and possibly two of the most beautiful women of earth.) However, losing hair at a younger age is clearly traumatic for some people, so this website is for them 🙂
Women also have more of an enzyme called aromotase, which stimulates the hormone production of estrone and estradiol; both of these hormones act against hair follicle-shrinking DHT. In most women, aromotase production is significant at the front of the hairline—meaning loss here is less common in women, but not impossible. Sometimes, conditions such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, infertility and menstrual irregularities may interfere with estrone and estradiol production so that loss at the hairline occurs.
Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like - if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size - with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.
Minoxidil — the generic name for the topical over-the-counter treatment many people know as Rogaine — has been shown to provide some regrowth of hair or prevent further hair loss. Rogaine now comes in a 5 percent foam for women, which is to be applied once a day, and must be used indefinitely (read: for the rest of your earthly life); if you stop using it, hair loss will recur. Some studies have shown that about 20 percent of women experience moderate regrowth of hair and about 40 percent experience some regrowth of hair after four months of use; results are best for women who start the treatment as soon as they start to experience hair loss. (So, you know, go back in time — and while you’re at it, ditch that boyfriend a lot sooner, and wear sunscreen daily... you know the rest.)

It’s simple, really: the more you mess with your hair, the more damage you cause to your follicles. This truth was laid out in Dove Men+Care’s Hair Fall Study, which found that the over-styling and use of heated tools were incredibly damaging to hair. As it turns out, the solution to this problem is equally simple: don’t overdo it. At the most, you should only need to use heat on your hair once a week. To make your style last longer, it may be time to invest in a can of dry shampoo. And for more hair care tips, This is the Healthiest Way to Straighten Your Hair.


The VS model discussed her ongoing struggle with the disorder via Instagram saying, 'Mine started when I was around 15yo! It started with me pulling on my eyelashes and almost quick after it went to me pulling in my eyebrow hair! I no longer pull on my eyelashes and have been pulling on my eyebrows ever since! The episodes are worse under a lot of stress or when I'm not doing anything like watching tv or reading a book!'
Hi Prithak, I wouldn’t focus too much on the number of hairs lost each day. Look at your hairline and hair thickness and see if it decreasing over time. At your age there is a lot you can do to keep your hair. For starters, I would recommend alkalising your body and removing foods that could cause you allergic reactions, leading to inflammation. Also make sure you don’t use any chemical shampoos or hot water on your hair. That’s a simple way to get started and protect your hair.
Start by getting good sleep, consistently. Cut back on smoking and drinking, both of which compromise the hair’s fiber production. Bauman says to avoid certain medications, like antihypertensives (which prevent high blood pressure complications), hormone treatments (such as thyroid or testosterone hormone replacement), statin drugs, mood modulators (like antidepressants and anti-anxiety agents), all of which that can hinder the hair’s growth and strength. And, as mentioned, avoid supplements like creatine, which will increase DHT production and thus accelerate loss.
About half of all women find their hair thinning by age 50. Although some websites promote estrogen as a way to prevent hair loss, the hormone’s effects on hair growth are not well known, and long-term hormone therapy is linked to serious health risks, “so unless you need to take it for other reasons, it’s not something I would recommend,” said Dr. Paradi Mirmirani, the regional director for hair disorders at Kaiser Permanente-Northern California.
Terrible diet may not be the reason of what is strictly defined as “balding”. Though, lack of essential nutrients for example proteins, vitamins, keratin, plus minerals can guide to harsh hair fall which could report to baldness. Fair meals make sure good furnish of nutrients to hair follicles. Furthermore, healthy food suppresses hormones for example DHT. Dihydrotestosterone otherwise DHT is a hormone which plays a main role in causing hairlessness in men.
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
In my youth, stylists would always tell me, "Wow, you've got a lot of hair." So much so that I took my lush mane for granted—perming, straightening, and bleaching my way through my teens. But everything changed during my sophomore year of college, as I found myself pulling more and more tangles out of my brush and strands from the shower drain. The compliments stopped and the worry began. I jealously examined the girl next to me on the subway. Why couldn't I see through to the roots on her scalp, too?
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