Stress can affect every aspect of your health in sneaky ways, and the thinning of your precious locks is but one. In this study published in the American Journal of Pathology, researchers found that stress can actually cause your hair cycle to be pushed into a common type of hair loss called telogen effluvium. At the peak of your stress, you can actually shock the hair cycle, repeatedly pushing it into the shedding phase. However, this type of hair loss doesn’t have to be permanent. Engaging in activities or practices that release these feelings of tension and worry can bring your hair back to a healthy routine—one that doesn’t clog your drain. To cool down and relax for good, bone up on these 32 Secrets of a Stress-Proof Life.
I’m glad to hear that wearing hats does not cause hair loss. I heard one of the biggest reasons for hair loss for men is from hats. I wear a hat almost everyday so I was pretty nervous. I think I will eventually be bald but I didn’t want to speed up the process. I think I would probably still wear hats even if it did cause hair loss. But it’s nice to know it doesn’t. Thanks for debunking some hair myths for me!

Some men have a genuine fear of going bald and it can cause high stress levels, low self-esteem, reduced sex drive and even depression. But if you understand the causes and accept them you are much more likely to conquer these fears. Most men feel a momentary loss of confidence when they realise they are losing hair but this is often overcome quickly. The only way to ensure you won’t suffer psychological problems is to face up to the realities of baldness and either accept it or seek treatment that works for you.
Less common causes of hair loss without inflammation or scarring include the pulling out of hair, certain medications including chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, hypothyroidism, and malnutrition including iron deficiency.[2][3] Causes of hair loss that occurs with scarring or inflammation include fungal infection, lupus erythematosus, radiation therapy, and sarcoidosis.[2][3] Diagnosis of hair loss is partly based on the areas affected.[3]
Localized or diffuse hair loss may also occur in cicatricial alopecia (lupus erythematosus, lichen plano pilaris, folliculitis decalvans, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, postmenopausal frontal fibrosing alopecia, etc.). Tumours and skin outgrowths also induce localized baldness (sebaceous nevus, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma).
your situation is very common and I assume you have had a thorough investigation ruling out any medical condition for your hair thinning. Minoxidil may restore some vellus hair but unlikely to result in significant terminal hair. As long as it is not getting worse, then a hair transplant procedure may be the answer for you to restore the feminine shape to your hairline 

Just because hair loss is a visible condition doesn’t mean that you’ll see it right away. In fact, people often don’t notice that they are experience hair loss until half of the process has occurred. It’s important to keep an eye on the following symptoms so that you can treat the condition as early as possible. The earlier you treat hair loss, the better your results will be. Here are a few common female hair loss symptoms:

Yes, the frontal hair loss is more as compared to other sides, but I can notice thin hair on sides and back too. Now, I can see my scalp easily when I comb, this shows that hair is thinning and falling from other sides too, I would say it’s androgenetic alopecia because I am losing hair from temples and the hair line is also receding. My scalp feels itchy from nearly 5 years and my hair fall problem started nearly 18 months ago…
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