Hair Loss Can Have Psychological Effects -- While hair loss is often falsely thought of as merely a cosmetic problem, studies have proven that hair loss can have wide-ranging psychological effects on women, including loss of confidence and self-esteem and in some cases, depression, anxiety, social withdrawal and more. Whether your hair loss is the result of natural hormonal changes and/or other underlying causes, in most cases hair loss is a treatable condition and not something you have to live with or hide. Preventing further hair loss and improving hair growth can restore a feeling of vitality, youth and confidence for women.
In fact, most of the women I spoke with would not accept the diagnosis of genetic hair loss. They would rather have an illness. If a cure could not be found, at least there was a reason beyond their control. A woman appearing without hair because of a cancer fight is brave. What about those of us who are just losing our hair? There is no place for us, so we hide in shame.

When women have female pattern hair loss, the pattern of the shedding is completely different. While it is still located around the top of the head, it affects the vertex more diffusely, as opposed to being confined to defined areas. While thinning can certainly be significant, the chances of it forming noticeable bald areas are much less likely than with men. Instead, hair tends to look less voluminous than it once did, and the severity of the loss is recorded on something called the Ludwig Scale, which can be seen here.


Harmful lifestyle plus sure kinds of medications otherwise diseases can lead to hormonal imbalance in men. This inequity might trigger extreme secretion of DHT hormone. Consequently hair begins to fall off in droves. Superior testosterone is linked to hair loss. If you have genetic hair loss, what you inherit is hair follicles which enclose a senior sensitivity to DHT that is a hormone collected of single kind of testosterone.
Other approaches to hair thinning include using cosmetic "camouflage" sprays and powders that cover the scalp with a color close to one’s own hair color, which reduces the contrast between hair and scalp and makes the hair loss less noticeable. Surgical hair transplants are an option, but you must have enough "donor" hair to spare at the back of your scalp. A new treatment approved by the F.D.A. uses low-level laser lights on the scalp but the benefit is “modest,” Dr. Mirmirani said.
Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.
Ever feel like pulling your hair out?  Menopause can do that to you.  Hot flashes, weight gain, crankiness—but wait—there’s more!  Just when the mind reels from those menopausal symptoms, one day you notice your hair is not quite as thick and shiny as it used to be.  In fact, there are some tiny patches where you can actually see scalp!  What is going on?
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
This is probably the most common sign that your hair is starting to thin out. The receding hairline usually starts out as something small – maybe the hair around your temples gets a little bit thinner than the rest of your hair, or your forehead is a centimeter taller. At first, it’s not that big of a deal. But when you leave the receding hairline unchecked, it usually continues to grow until it creates a large M-shape pattern in the hair.
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While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
During this procedure, surgeons remove a narrow strip of scalp and divide it into hundreds of tiny grafts, each containing just a few hairs. Each graft is planted in a slit in the scalp created by a blade or needle in the area of missing hair. Hair grows naturally this way, in small clusters of one to four follicles, called follicular units. As a result, the graft looks better than the larger "plugs" associated with hair transplants of yesteryear.
Oh my receding hairline is so tied to hormones! I lost my first batch of my thick, beautiful hair when I was pregnant and the next after my hysterectomy….I am still thinning and, you are right, it does seem to worse when I am stressed. It does change how I feel about myself. Thank you for, as usual, bringing great solutions and suggestions Ellen. I will definitely check some out!
Alright everyone, try things in cycles of at least 4 weeks or so, then you will have the ability to notice what works for your hair and what does not.  Hopefully some of these tips will flow into your hair care regimen leading your thinning hair to blossom to its full potential.  For most of us this will not happen overnight (or in a week).  Don’t forget – Patience is a virtue, but it also means you have to wait!  Concentrate on doing the right things with your hair now, it will definitely pay off later!  Happy hair growing!!!
One of the most common yet least talked about symptoms of menopause, hair loss can be devastating for the millions of women who suffer from it. Americans spend upwards of a billion dollars per year on hair loss treatments. According to the American Hair Loss Society, 99% of these treatments are unfortunately ineffective. Most women do not want to sit back and let their hair fall out slowly without taking action. Luckily, there are alternative solutions that are safe and effective for the multitudes of women experiencing hair loss.

Androgenic Alopecia: This affects both men and women, but is more common in men. This is also referred to as “male pattern baldness” and can affect men as early as their late teenage years or early twenties. Typically, this type of alopecia will produce a gradually receding hairline, which eventually results in loss or thinning of most of the hair on the scalp. This is the most common type of alopecia that causes early hair loss.

Women also have more of an enzyme called aromotase, which stimulates the hormone production of estrone and estradiol; both of these hormones act against hair follicle-shrinking DHT. In most women, aromotase production is significant at the front of the hairline—meaning loss here is less common in women, but not impossible. Sometimes, conditions such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, infertility and menstrual irregularities may interfere with estrone and estradiol production so that loss at the hairline occurs.


Trichotillomania, classified as an “impulse control disorder,” causes people to compulsively pull their hair out. “It’s sort of like a tic, the person is constantly playing and pulling their hair,” says Dr. Glashofer says. Unfortunately, this constant playing and pulling can actually strip your head of its natural protection: hair. Trichotillomania often begins before the age of 17 and is four times as common in women as in men. 

2) I’m 32 and my hairline has receded from the temples on back, which started when I was 15. Since then my hair has thinned out a bit on top. The hairless at 15 started abruptly… Strands upon strands fell over over a period of a few months… Which was mortifying to me! However, since then my hair loss has slowed dramatically… Since I have these small peach fuzz like hairs on my temples, and although it’s been 17 years since the hair size shrunk drastically…. Do you think it’s possible to revive these hairs into thicker, terminal hairs?
The directions say patients will see an improvement in hair growth in six weeks, but Dr. Mirmirani suggested trying it for six months before deciding whether it works or not. About a third of patients who use it see significant improvements, another third find it prevents hair loss from getting worse, and the remainder don’t see any effect, she said.
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.
Hi David, I understand where you are coming from. Losing hair at a young age is not a nice experience. Luckily, there is a lot more you could be doing besides the shampoo. Honestly I don’t know how much this will help in the long term. To get you started, you’ll probably have to adjust a few things in your diet and lifestyle to stop further loss/ regrow lost areas. A simple thing to get started would be to use a dermaroller (or even better a dermastamp) along the hairline. Remember though, pattern baldness starts from the inside out. It’s basically a sign that your body is out of balance. So try to sort that out as well.
I have struggled with my hair for a long time now. I am quickly approaching my 40s and I have bad hair quality. Recently, I have also noticed that my hair has stopped growing as it used to. A few years ago I went to the salon on a monthly basis. Now, it takes me almost two months before I even need to cut my hair! I am desperate and I really need help right now. Hair is one of the most important parts of a woman and I don’t want to give up on this one. I went to the doctors but they didn’t found anything wrong with me. The exams I took showed that I am healthy and there’s no reason for this to even happen to me. Please, I really need hair advice urgently!!!!!!!!!!!!

Men often first notice hair loss on the temple area or on the hair line. Many refer to this as a "receding hair line." While this is not necessarily the beginning of progressive male pattern baldness, it can be distressing. It can also be very confusing sorting through hundreds of hair loss products and misinformation on the topic. Although it can be moderately challenging to regrow temple hair, it can be done and there is an additional permanent option if you are unsuccessful.

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