Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.
Hair loss is something that happens to the majority of men at some point in time. Despite the fact that most of us have a slim chance of keeping the same head of hair throughout our lives, we still cling to the idea that hair loss won’t happen to us. Unfortunately, this denial makes it more difficult to stop male pattern baldness from claiming most of our hair.
“Right now, the only FDA approved medication, for hair loss is topical Minoxidil, which comes as a 2% solution for twice-daily use in women. The FDA did approve 5% Rogaine Foam for once-daily use in women, but it is not being sold in stores yet.Women may also use various low-level light therapy devices such as the HairMax Lasercomb, which has FDA clearance to treat hair loss,” according to Dr. Rogers.

Symptoms of gradual hair loss are sometimes hard to notice until nearly half the hair is gone. The most obvious signs are a thinning of the temples and hairline recession. Otherwise, the hair loss can be more widespread and balanced. This steady shedding is called “invisible baldness”, since the hair becomes gradually less dense until suddenly it is perceptible to the naked eye. “In general, hair loss is a chronic, progressive condition that gets worse over time without treatment,” Bauman says.
A few years back, your hair was so thick that we could barely see your scalp. But these days, parting your hair leaves a noticeable gap that everyone can see. This is because you’ve lost some of the hair in your crown area, effectively losing some of your hair’s volume. The problem is that you never really know how much thinning is going to happen. For some men, it could just be a little bit of shedding. For others, their hair could continue thinning until there are large bald patches.
The relationship between food and hair is simple. Hair is made up of a protein called keratin. So, it's essential that you include sufficient protein in your diet. A low-protein diet forces your body to save the available protein for other purposes, like rebuilding cells, thus depriving hair of it. Dr Shah says spinach, almonds, walnuts, paneer, tofu and milk are hair-happy foods. Green tea is effective because it blocks out Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone that causes hair loss.
Another sneaky culprit of hair loss is alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that confuses the hair for an attack on the immune system. According to Marc Glashofer, MD, a dermatologist in New York City, if your hair loss is occurring in round circles on your scalp, then you most likely are a victim of alopecia. Alopecia can be treated with steroids and even over-the-counter products like Rogaine.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
The psychology of hair thinning is a complex issue. Hair is considered an essential part of overall identity: especially for women, for whom it often represents femininity and attractiveness. Men typically associate a full head of hair with youth and vigor. Although they may be aware of pattern baldness in their family, many are uncomfortable talking about the issue. Hair thinning is therefore a sensitive issue for both sexes. For sufferers, it can represent a loss of control and feelings of isolation. People experiencing hair thinning often find themselves in a situation where their physical appearance is at odds with their own self-image and commonly worry that they appear older than they are or less attractive to others. Psychological problems due to baldness, if present, are typically most severe at the onset of symptoms.[11]

Although it’s generally only prescribed as a last resort for menopausal symptoms, hormone replacement therapy is a common and very effective hair loss treatment for some women — as long as they are menopausal or post-menopausal and are not at higher risk for adverse effects from HRT. It's most often prescribed for women who have androgenetic alopecia, also called pattern baldness. Hormone replacement therapy has a number of benefits for both general health and symptom management, but also a number of side effects — which range from unpleasant to dangerous.


Hair transplant are a well-liked way to reinstate hair these days as the effects are totally natural-looking plus involve hair return using hair from the patient’s own head. Hair transplant can be performing on both men plus women moreover are only not possible if Alopecia Totalis has previously occurred (total hair loss throughout the death of the hair follicles).
She leaned in closer. “You’re writing about perimenopause, right?” I nodded. I couldn’t imagine what she was going to say. She had found some weird, counterintuitive cure for hot flashes that included the wearing of heavy woolen headgear? She had (God forbid) some terrible disease? “I think I’m going bald,” she whispered, “and I think it has to do with hormones.”

In addition to behavioral changes, Bauman says you can slow hair loss by taking routine nutritional supplements. He recommends a professional-grade Biotin, called Viviscal Professional or Nutrafol Men. “Nutrafol targets several possible triggers for hair loss and hair thinning, including inflammation, the effects of cortisol (stress hormones), free radical damage, and more.”   He also suggests using grooming products that contain caffeine (like Davines’ Energizing lineup), saw palmetto (Serenoa Repens) such as MiN New York daily shampoo, and green tea extracts (ECGC) like Paul Mitchell’s scalp care assortment. “These can help strengthen the follicles and help prevent shedding,” he says.


It’s simple, really: the more you mess with your hair, the more damage you cause to your follicles. This truth was laid out in Dove Men+Care’s Hair Fall Study, which found that the over-styling and use of heated tools were incredibly damaging to hair. As it turns out, the solution to this problem is equally simple: don’t overdo it. At the most, you should only need to use heat on your hair once a week. To make your style last longer, it may be time to invest in a can of dry shampoo. And for more hair care tips, This is the Healthiest Way to Straighten Your Hair.
In other words, no one’s truly safe from the condition. But even in the face of these seemingly insurmountable odds, not all hope is lost for your precious locks. To show your hair some TLC (and prevent further thinning), look out for these surprising culprits—and combat them accordingly. And if you need a quick way to mask any thinning hair, just check out the 15 Best Haircuts for Looking Instantly Younger.
Great article and helpful information. When I was a younger age I didn’t worry about having hair loss, but I knew already that thinning hair can affect men and women of any age. Hair loss can happen for all sorts of reasons, for example, it can be related to diet, exercise, illness, stress, disease, or hereditary causes, like you mentioned in this post. Toppik is a hair building fiber treatment that may overcome it. Thanks a lot. .
Common Mistakes to Avoid -- When it comes to hair loss, missing the early signs is one of the first mistakes many women make. A staggering 50 percent loss can occur before it's noticeable to the human eye. The other common mistake women (and men, for that matter) make when trying to treat their hair loss is not giving enough time for therapy to work and not tracking their results properly. Just like hair loss, initial changes in hair regrowth take time and can be subtle before they are noticeable to the naked eye.
There are two types of identification tests for female pattern baldness: the Ludwig Scale and the Savin Scale. Both track the progress of diffused thinning, which typically begins on the crown of the head behind the hairline, and becomes gradually more pronounced. For male pattern baldness, the Hamilton–Norwood scale tracks the progress of a receding hairline and/or a thinning crown, through to a horseshoe-shaped ring of hair around the head and on to total baldness.
I explained to Emily that The Iowa Writers’ Workshop wasn’t really in the business of handing out medical degrees, but that since my hair was also thinning, and since I was curious, and since I supposed we weren’t the only two women on the planet who wanted some answers, I’d do some research. This is what I came up with for how to handle hair loss during perimenopause.
Genetics is the most common reason for baldness, yes, but, according to this study in PLOS Genetics, it’s a more complicated process than we initially thought, and involves more than 280 genes. From this genetic map, researchers were able to determine which participants were in danger of losing their hair, and from those in the danger zone, about 20 percent could blame their mothers for such a predicament—not their father. Though, it is important to note that men and women lose their hair in very different ways. For men, the hair slowly begins receding at the temples, before eventually forming an M-shaped hairline, while women may notice a gradual widening of the scalp and thinning texture of their hair. 

This is a hereditary condition that affects about 30 million American women, according to the America Academy of Dermatology, and is the most common kind of hair loss Rogers sees in her practice. She tells WebMD that it happens to about 50% of women. Although it mostly occurs in the late 50s or 60s, it can happen at any time, even during teenage years, Rogers says.
There are many potential causes of hair loss in women , including medical conditions, medications, and physical or emotional stress. If you notice unusual hair loss of any kind, it's important to see your primary care provider or a dermatologist, to determine the cause and appropriate treatment. You may also want to ask your clinician for a referral to a therapist or support group to address emotional difficulties. Hair loss in women can be frustrating, but recent years have seen an increase in resources for coping with the problem.

There are also autoimmune disorders--alopecia areata is considered an autoimmune disorder--that can cause the hair to fall out in round smooth patches. Some men, women and children lose their hair this way or lose all their hair over their entire body. This is a devastating condition that can often go into remission and the hair will grow back as suddenly as it disappeared. This is particularly difficult for young women and I interviews some women who told me they contemplated suicide.

Hormones are often not the only things to blame when it comes to female hair loss. Several factors can be at play. If female hair loss runs in your family, you may be more likely to experience hair loss during menopause. Other hormonal imbalances, nutritional or iron deficiencies, medication, illness, conditions (like thyroid disease and anemia), diets, and surgeries can also contribute to hair loss.

A new medication can bring about a whole host of changes to your body—while also affecting the rate at which hair grows on your entire body. Certain medications can lead to two types of hair loss: telogen effluvium and anagen effluvium. Telogen effluvium can begin to take effect within the first two to four months after taking a new medication. If you notice more hair loss than usual, notify your doctor immediately to save your most prized possession from further damage. The second type of hair loss, anagen effluvium, is most common in cancer patients receiving regular doses of chemotherapy. This type of hair loss prevents your matrix cells from producing new hair altogether, meaning that you may lose hair on other parts of your body as well. And for more ways to make the most of your mane, check out these 15 Top Hair Tips from Top Hollywood Stylists.
This is what I have been waiting for, I cannot and will not vote conservative again and Liebour is totally out of the question. If Nigel is true to his word, and I dont doubt him, then I will have a place for my vote, as will many others. We voted out and the arrogant political elite have taken our vote and trampled on it, they never did want to leave the corrupt EU and have done everything in their power to make sure we dont, with little or no regard for democracy.
Once considered a mark of a middle age crisis among men, hair loss and thinning hair is fairly common among women as well. Some 30 million women in the U.S. have hereditary hair loss (compared with 50 million men). Daily tasks such as brushing and washing your hair can turn from relaxing to puzzling when excess shedding around the hairline occurs. Being an unlucky victim of either genetics or improper hair styling can cause a receding hairline.
Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.
If you’re beginning to notice more of your hair clogging up the drain, it may be time to do a thorough assessment of the products you’re using on a daily or weekly basis. For starters, as previously mentioned, it might be a good idea to replace your standard shampoo with one that is strictly clarifying. While you’re in the shower, right after you’ve rinsed the conditioner out of your hair, stimulate hair growth by giving your scalp a quick 30-second massage. Finally, forego the stigma of Rogaine to reap the scientifically-proven benefits that are an easy addition to your morning routine.
Hi Dave, thanks for your comment. Yes losing your hair, especially at a young age can be extremely traumatic. Luckily, there is a lot you can do to stop any further loss and even regrow lost hair. I suggest taking the quiz and signing up for emails where I show you the steps that really work to reverse hair loss. There are two parts to this process. T
For those who don’t plan on counting their hair every day, there are ways to know when hair is thinning or being lost at a higher rate. Roberts tells WebMD that women will see a difference. When waking up in the morning, there may be an usually large amount on your pillow. When you comb your hair (especially without tugging, which can pull the hair out), more than normal will be left in the comb.
I took your quiz. Sadly, the answers I gave were as of my early 20s, when my hairline started receding and had that ‘M shape’. I receded to Norwood 3, but mysteriously, the receding stopped there. The only explanation I can think of is that I gave up junk food and started eating more fresh fruit and veggies and started regular running and hiking. I lost a lot of weight and felt great. Until my early 50s, when suddenly my hair began to rapidly recede and I developed a bald spot in back. I panicked, thinking that I might have a serious medical condition, since I had not changed my good living habits. My doctor reassured me that I was still very healthy. Next stop: hair restoration specialist. He informed me that I had male pattern baldness and would eventually go completely bald on top. To my surprise and delight, my wife was thrilled that I was going bald and begged me to just let nature take its course. She confessed to me that she had always secretly wished that I would someday go bald and was delighted that her wish was finally coming true. Reluctantly, I agreed to just let myself go bald. Two things amaze me: First, how fast I went bald (less than two years to go completely bald on top). It was as if I was making up for lost time. Secondly, the sudden change in my attitude. Whereas I was panicked my wife would hate it, now thanks largely to her encouragement, I couldn’t go bald fast enough. It was a huge turn of for my wife and me. She still loves to sneak up behind me while I’m relaxing watching TV news or sports and kiss me on top of my bald head. I haven’t just adjusted to being bald. I really love being bald and wouldn’t ever try to regrow my hair. Not at my age. I’m in my 70s and it is quite normal for someone my age to be bald. The information you email to me I will pass on to my two sons, who, like me, face the likelyhood that they will eventually go bald. They are in their mid 30s and their hairlines are beginning to recede a little at their temples. I chose to go bald. They don’t have to. Oh, a third thing amazes me: that there are women out there who prefer bald men to men with a full head of hair. Thank God I am married to one of those women.
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