I am 33 yrs old and just recently in the last 3 months I’ve noticed progressive hair loss near my crown and parts and my hair gets really oily like one day after I shower in my crown area. there is male pattern baldness in my family on my Dad’s side but none of the females on his side are affected. I have had a lot of emotional stress lately. I am worried that I have female pattern hair loss and it will be progressive. Can this be reversed esp at this young age if I make sure I’m nutritionally well and control my stress?
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder also known as "spot baldness" that can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis). Although thought to be caused by hair follicles becoming dormant, what triggers alopecia areata is not known. In most cases the condition corrects itself, but it can also spread to the entire scalp (alopecia totalis) or to the entire body (alopecia universalis).
When your hair thins at an early age it can lead to anxiety, self-esteem issues, and lowered satisfaction when it come to your personal appearance. Initially, many guys try to overcome this by wearing a baseball cap or looking for over-the-counter hair thickening shampoos. Some brave souls will accept their genetic fate and go completely bald – but that look doesn’t always work for everyone.

Just as pregnancy hormone changes can cause hair loss, so can switching or going off birth-control pills. This can also cause telogen effluvium, and it may be more likely if you have a family history of hair loss. The change in the hormonal balance that occurs at menopause may also have the same result. “The androgen (male hormone) receptors on the scalp becoming activated,” explains Mark Hammonds, MD, a dermatologist with Scott & White Clinic in Round Rock, Texas. “The hair follicles will miniaturize and then you start to lose more hair.”

Thick, healthy hair is a sign of youth, good health, and beauty. It can be devastating to watch your hair fall out, not just because you might feel like you’re losing your younger self, but also because you may worry that something even more serious is going on with your body. As women, we understand that thinning hair or outright hair loss is more than just a cosmetic concern. Besides being so important to self-esteem, your hair is a reflection of your overall health picture — especially your thyroid health.


The Belgravia Centre is an organisation specialising in hair growth and hair loss prevention with two clinics and in-house pharmacies in Central London, UK. If you are worried about hair loss you can arrange a free consultation with a hair loss expert or complete our Online Consultation Form from anywhere in the world. View our Hair Loss Success Stories, which includes the world’s largest gallery of hair growth comparison photos and demonstrates the levels of success that so many of Belgravia’s patients achieve. You can also phone 020 7730 6666 any time to arrange a free consultation.


These three levels of approaches are not mutually exclusive. A woman may use different approaches at different times or any combination of them depending on the duration and severity of symptoms. Today, more and more women find that dealing with menopause symptoms is best accomplished via a combination of healthy lifestyle and alternative treatments.
If you’re beginning to notice more of your hair clogging up the drain, it may be time to do a thorough assessment of the products you’re using on a daily or weekly basis. For starters, as previously mentioned, it might be a good idea to replace your standard shampoo with one that is strictly clarifying. While you’re in the shower, right after you’ve rinsed the conditioner out of your hair, stimulate hair growth by giving your scalp a quick 30-second massage. Finally, forego the stigma of Rogaine to reap the scientifically-proven benefits that are an easy addition to your morning routine.

Fusco says that there’s something called miniaturization happening at the follicular level when a hair falls out. “Miniaturization refers to the slow shrinking of the hair follicle and the diminution of the hair within, until eventually the follicle no longer exists,” she says. “The remaining tiny hair falls out and nothing grows back.” She says that this is often genetic and caused by a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is a byproduct of testosterone. DHT clings to the follicle and then slowly shrinks it. This most commonly happens at the temples, the crown, and the front of the head. (This is also why you don’t see guys losing their hair around the sides and back.)
Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like - if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size - with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.

I personally love short hair on women, I cut my own hair very short a couple of times. But it's hard to shake off that feeling that somehow you've failed as a woman, because you don't have luscious flowing locks. The amount of times I've had guys ask me if I was a lesbian when I had short hair just illustrates the fact that we live in a world where people judge even your sexuality by what your hair looks like!

A key aspect of hair loss with age is the aging of the hair follicle.[43] Ordinarily, hair follicle renewal is maintained by the stem cells associated with each follicle. Aging of the hair follicle appears to be primed by a sustained cellular response to the DNA damage that accumulates in renewing stem cells during aging.[44] This damage response involves the proteolysis of type XVII collagen by neutrophil elastase in response to the DNA damage in the hair follicle stem cells. Proteolysis of collagen leads to elimination of the damaged cells and then to terminal hair follicle miniaturization.

Like anything else, genes from mom can play a role. But she’s only half the pie. You can also inherit these genes from your father, says Dr. Alan J. Bauman, Hair Restoration Physician and founder of Bauman Medical. “Hair-loss genes can be inherited from either your mother's or father's side of the family, or a combination of the two,” he says. He adds that there are roughly 200 different genes that regulate your hair growth, so the combination of these genes—from both parents—can be unique and won’t always pattern itself from one sibling to the next.
Another way to stimulate new follicle hair growth may be to work from within. If you're looking for a systemic solution to improve the health and happiness of your hair follicles and the skin around them, adding certain vitamin- and mineral-rich foods to your diet is a great place to start. Vitamins and minerals can keep keratin levels healthy, as do proteins, fatty acids and omega-3s. Look to nuts, avocados, biotin-rich whole grains, citrus, orange vegetables such as carrots and leafy greens like spinach to keep your locks looking full and healthy.
Yes, we’re all for the quick wash and rinse routine in the shower, but how much damage is this brevity doing to your hair? As it turns out, quite a bit. Aside from the leftover product residue, there are some of us who produce more Sebum, which naturally lubricates our skin. It’s what makes your shiny and greasy after a few days without a shampoo. If you’re a healthy adult experiencing hair loss, you can probably blame this occurrence on clogged hair follicles. The solution? Start using a clarifying shampoo two to three times a week. Be sure that the shampoo does not contain any conditioner, as this is the stuff that created the problem in the first place. And for more great hair care tips, check out the one haircut that will shave 10 years off your age. 

Adjusting to permanent hair loss is challenging for most women. Menopausal hair loss can be upsetting and cause anxiety, but is not usually a sign of an underlying medical disorder, unless accompanied by other symptoms. Improving general and nutritional health may help slow loss. There are cosmetic options for improving the appearance of hair and medical treatments which, when used long term can improve hair growth. If you have other symptoms as well as your hair loss, seek the advice of your doctor.

I have struggled with my hair for a long time now. I am quickly approaching my 40s and I have bad hair quality. Recently, I have also noticed that my hair has stopped growing as it used to. A few years ago I went to the salon on a monthly basis. Now, it takes me almost two months before I even need to cut my hair! I am desperate and I really need help right now. Hair is one of the most important parts of a woman and I don’t want to give up on this one. I went to the doctors but they didn’t found anything wrong with me. The exams I took showed that I am healthy and there’s no reason for this to even happen to me. Please, I really need hair advice urgently!!!!!!!!!!!!
A substantially blemished face, back and limbs could point to cystic acne. The most severe form of the condition, cystic acne, arises from the same hormonal imbalances that cause hair loss and is associated with dihydrotestosterone production.[9] Seborrheic dermatitis, a condition in which an excessive amount of sebum is produced and builds up on the scalp (looking like an adult cradle cap), is also a symptom of hormonal imbalances, as is an excessively oily or dry scalp. Both can cause hair thinning.
Hair Loss Can Have Psychological Effects -- While hair loss is often falsely thought of as merely a cosmetic problem, studies have proven that hair loss can have wide-ranging psychological effects on women, including loss of confidence and self-esteem and in some cases, depression, anxiety, social withdrawal and more. Whether your hair loss is the result of natural hormonal changes and/or other underlying causes, in most cases hair loss is a treatable condition and not something you have to live with or hide. Preventing further hair loss and improving hair growth can restore a feeling of vitality, youth and confidence for women.
While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
If you have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), your hormones are always out of whack. Your body makes more male hormones, or androgen, than it should. This can cause extra hair to sprout on your face and body while the hair on your head thins out. PCOS can also lead to ovulation problems, acne, and weight gain. But sometimes thinning hair is the only obvious sign.
The important distinction between male pattern baldness and female pattern hair loss is that, whilst men may develop absolute baldness – when the damaged follicles can no longer function so hair growth stops, and the skin takes on a smooth, shiny appearance – this is rare in women. Women’s hair loss may become advanced, but true baldness – as men experience it – is highly unlikely.
Hair loss can start as soon as puberty ends, depending on your hereditary sensitivity to DHT. That phrasing is key: Bauman stresses that it is not DHT production that causes hair loss, it's the inherited sensitivity to DHT that causes the loss. Those with high sensitivity will be the first to experience a weakening in their follicles. This results in thinning around the crown and hairline, and lighter pigment in the hair. Behaviors that increase DHT production will magnify the loss depending on sensitivity. These behaviors include smoking, creatine supplements, resistance and weight training exercise, stress, and taking anabolic steroids or testosterone hormone replacement.
Less common causes of hair loss without inflammation or scarring include the pulling out of hair, certain medications including chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, hypothyroidism, and malnutrition including iron deficiency.[2][3] Causes of hair loss that occurs with scarring or inflammation include fungal infection, lupus erythematosus, radiation therapy, and sarcoidosis.[2][3] Diagnosis of hair loss is partly based on the areas affected.[3] 

Topical estrogen and progesterone creams and oral medications are generally the forms prescribed for post-menopausal women with androgenetic alopecia. But HRT will rarely, if ever, be prescribed for treatment of hair loss alone.] If you have other bothersome symptoms which might warrant HRT, in addition to hair loss, you'll first need to undergo a thorough gynecologic and physical exam, and will likely have blood tests done to measure hormone levels before these drugs are prescribed.
There are two types of identification tests for female pattern baldness: the Ludwig Scale and the Savin Scale. Both track the progress of diffused thinning, which typically begins on the crown of the head behind the hairline, and becomes gradually more pronounced. For male pattern baldness, the Hamilton–Norwood scale tracks the progress of a receding hairline and/or a thinning crown, through to a horseshoe-shaped ring of hair around the head and on to total baldness.
You need to try the hair bungee. At least this is the conclusion I’ve come to in the last few months as this tiny piece of elastic has slowly made its way into my consciousness. A few months ago, a hair bungee arrived in my monthly Birchbox sample box. It looks exactly like a little bungee cord, complete with two metal hooks on the ends. I played with it briefly, but my hair is layered and not really long enough for a ponytail, so I passed it to a friend who looked at it in confusion and thanked me. I’m sure it’s floating around somewhere in the bottom of her handbag right now. Then during NYFW I went to a panel sponsored by Pantene featuring the Cushnie et Ochs designers Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs discussing the intersection of beauty and fashion with celebrity hair guru Danilo (you know you’re a guru when you can go by one name). Anyway, he used 60+ hair bungees on the models for the Fall 2011 Cushnie et Ochs show.
While warm water opens a hair's cuticle to allow shampoo and conditioner to do their job, cold water helps to close the cuticle and seal in moisture from the conditioner — which helps your hair look shiny and healthy. So, by all means, take a warm shower, but at the end, rinse with cold water. If you really don't like cold showers, stylists recommend pouring one cup apple cider vinegar mixed with two cups water over hair after washing and conditioning. Vinegar is a gentle exfoliator that removes product build-up and dandruff from the scalp.
Also new is the HairMax Laser Comb. It's a red light therapy hairbrush-like device that increases circulation and the biological march that makes hair. It's only approved in men (though some women are using it) and in my experience, is not as good as minoxidil. But in one study, 45% of users reported improvement after eight weeks, and 90% saw improvement after 16 weeks.
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
Sleep helps all our bodily functions and alow the body to build, repair and restore order. Have a calming bed-time routine such as a lavender bath, avoid stress and technology before bed and try to sleep in a darkened room if possible. Healthy sleep will help to rebalance hormones and nourish the adrenal glands which are the glands that produce stres hormones like cortisol.
Your body needs to be hydrated in order to function properly. Load up on H2O all day long and pass on juices, sodas, and other flavored drinks that contain more sugar than your body needs. The amount of water needed varies from person to person and depends on various factors, including overall health and exercise intensity. As a general rule, however, you should aim to have eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day.
I've never worn a wig, the remaining hair I do have is thick and really curly so it tends to hide things for me. I feel if it significantly progressed and I couldn't control it any more, then I almost definitely would. The high quality ones are very expensive though, which is a barrier for a lot of sufferers. I'm considering shaving my hair at the moment; but I know it'd be impossible for me not to pull the re-growth entirely.
I personally love short hair on women, I cut my own hair very short a couple of times. But it's hard to shake off that feeling that somehow you've failed as a woman, because you don't have luscious flowing locks. The amount of times I've had guys ask me if I was a lesbian when I had short hair just illustrates the fact that we live in a world where people judge even your sexuality by what your hair looks like!

I read in many health and fitness websites that excessive masturbation results in hair loss, because of the release of dht hormones after one masturbates, so is that true. For that matter i've even experienced hair fall because of masturbation. Earlier my hair used to be so strong. Now if i just move my palms around my hair i can find it in my palms. Please suggest some remedies to get my... READ MORE

Psst...here's a little secret. I have very curly hair. Yet after 10 years of straightening treatments, blowouts, etc., no one seems to believe me. Of course, that's my own fault. I gave up on my curls. But you don't have to. It's never been easier to keep curly hair bouncy and frizz-free. I quizzed four fashion insiders—three with naturally curly hair, one with a (super cute) perm—on why they love their curly hair, and how they style it.
Women also have more of an enzyme called aromotase, which stimulates the hormone production of estrone and estradiol; both of these hormones act against hair follicle-shrinking DHT. In most women, aromotase production is significant at the front of the hairline—meaning loss here is less common in women, but not impossible. Sometimes, conditions such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, infertility and menstrual irregularities may interfere with estrone and estradiol production so that loss at the hairline occurs.
Beginning at perimenopause in their 40s, women may see the effects of menopause on hair, including thinning hair, dull, graying and hair loss. Experts previously thought hair loss due to menopause was caused by low estrogen levels. But new research shows that hair loss in older women is likely due to lower levels of both estrogen and progesterone, causing hair follicles to thin and hair to fall out. 

2) I’m 32 and my hairline has receded from the temples on back, which started when I was 15. Since then my hair has thinned out a bit on top. The hairless at 15 started abruptly… Strands upon strands fell over over a period of a few months… Which was mortifying to me! However, since then my hair loss has slowed dramatically… Since I have these small peach fuzz like hairs on my temples, and although it’s been 17 years since the hair size shrunk drastically…. Do you think it’s possible to revive these hairs into thicker, terminal hairs?
When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”

Hair loss is a pretty tricky topic and most experts and doctors are never really able to pinpoint the cause. However, if you are looking to reduce your chance of hair loss or slow hair loss that is already progressing, you should consider the factors listed above. Your doctor may help you determine if a hormone imbalance or other medical condition may be the cause of your premature hair loss. If so, they may suggest hormone therapy, diet changes or other medications and treatments to help manage to condition or balance your hormones, which may naturally solve your hair loss problem.
When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

Reducing your stress should be your number one priority as it sounds like this could have been the original trigger. If you feel like your scalp is greasy then this could be to do with your diet. Take account of what you eat and try to remove fried foods or any foods containing vegetable oils. Processed foods in general should be avoided ideally. Seeing a doctor to find out what kind of hair loss yours is, is a good first step. Then you’ll be able to find the right treatment for it.


About the coffee… mmmh, I’m not totally sure to be honest. Having never drunk coffee myself I haven’t researched and experimented on its effects, but yes something that is highly acidic is not going to help. Perhaps replacing it with green tea and filtered or bottled water would be a better alternative, or another tea that is high in antioxidants such as cold brewed hibiscus (which has more antioxidants than any other tea.)
And once a lustrous dark curtain, my hair had taken on an alarming transparent quality. I spent hours staring at my scalp in the mirror, parting and re-parting my hair to see which side looked fuller. I drenched my head with volumizing sprays, detoxifying tonics, and shampoos for "weakened hair." Remedies were thick on the ground—but my hair kept getting thinner. I was molting. And I was scared.
A hair follicle needs energy to grow. Coenzyme Q10, found in whole grains, fish and meat, boosts the scalp’s ability to produce energy, especially in a cell’s mitochondria or energy factory. Stress causes oxidation, harming Coenzyme Q10 among other anti-oxidants, thereby accelerating hair fall. High stress has become the most common cause of numerous problems. Trichologists and hair experts agree that stress triggers problems such as alopecia areata, telogen effluvium and trichotillomania that lead to balding. The silver lining is that balding caused due to stress can be reduced by adopting stress management techniques.
If you’re beginning to notice more of your hair clogging up the drain, it may be time to do a thorough assessment of the products you’re using on a daily or weekly basis. For starters, as previously mentioned, it might be a good idea to replace your standard shampoo with one that is strictly clarifying. While you’re in the shower, right after you’ve rinsed the conditioner out of your hair, stimulate hair growth by giving your scalp a quick 30-second massage. Finally, forego the stigma of Rogaine to reap the scientifically-proven benefits that are an easy addition to your morning routine.
Tightly pulling back your hair in ponytails, cornrows or braids can lead to traction alopecia, characterized by hair breakage along the hairline and temples. Women athletes who often wear their hair pulled back are particularly at risk. A change in hairstyle usually helps; however, hair loss may be permanent if the tight styling techniques have been used too long.
Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time.
The association among food plus hair is simple. Hair is completed up of a protein call keratin. Therefore, it’s vital that you comprise enough protein in your diet. A low-protein diet orders your body to keep the accessible protein for extra purpose, like upgrading cells, therefore stingy hair of it. Green tea is valuable as it blocks out Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone which causes hair loss.
You need to try the hair bungee. At least this is the conclusion I’ve come to in the last few months as this tiny piece of elastic has slowly made its way into my consciousness. A few months ago, a hair bungee arrived in my monthly Birchbox sample box. It looks exactly like a little bungee cord, complete with two metal hooks on the ends. I played with it briefly, but my hair is layered and not really long enough for a ponytail, so I passed it to a friend who looked at it in confusion and thanked me. I’m sure it’s floating around somewhere in the bottom of her handbag right now. Then during NYFW I went to a panel sponsored by Pantene featuring the Cushnie et Ochs designers Carly Cushnie and Michelle Ochs discussing the intersection of beauty and fashion with celebrity hair guru Danilo (you know you’re a guru when you can go by one name). Anyway, he used 60+ hair bungees on the models for the Fall 2011 Cushnie et Ochs show.
Women's hair loss is still so taboo because the socio-economic system we exist under puts unwarranted and unnecessary 'value' on physical appearance and social status, regardless of gender. Until we can liberate ourselves from this patriarchal and repressive system profiting from our insecurity, it will always be a taboo to stand out from 'the normal', which contributes to a lot of mental health problems across the board.
The relationship between food and hair is simple. Hair is made up of a protein called keratin. So, it's essential that you include sufficient protein in your diet. A low-protein diet forces your body to save the available protein for other purposes, like rebuilding cells, thus depriving hair of it. Dr Shah says spinach, almonds, walnuts, paneer, tofu and milk are hair-happy foods. Green tea is effective because it blocks out Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone that causes hair loss.
Tightly pulling back your hair in ponytails, cornrows or braids can lead to traction alopecia, characterized by hair breakage along the hairline and temples. Women athletes who often wear their hair pulled back are particularly at risk. A change in hairstyle usually helps; however, hair loss may be permanent if the tight styling techniques have been used too long.
The basic approach is to stimulate hair growth at the root by giving your body the support it needs. Many women find that a nutrient-rich diet, high-quality nutritional supplements and a little stress relief can do wonders. If you find your hair loss is connected to a thyroid, hormonal, or stress imbalance, a specific herbal combination product will help to rebalance your body naturally.
This ‘diffuse generalized hair loss’ is present in 26% of post-menopausal women over the age of 45, according to the British Association of Dermatologists’ study.  That includes hair not just on the top of your head, but also near what they term ‘androgen-sensitive sites,’ or the hair ‘down there.’ It thins out, too, even as facial hair gain takes root in most women: 40% attested to that in this particular study.  So, in essence, thick hair where you don’t want it and thinning where you want the hair to stay put and grow.
(I.e. Hair Thinning Around Hairline and Crown) Hello, I am a 23yr old male. I have noticed my hair has thinned considerably at the crown, temples, and hairline. I have noticed shedding in the shower; a few hairs at a time when I shampoo. I wish to stop or correct this before it gets worse. I have no known allergies. My father is partly bald and his father was almost completely bald. My... READ MORE
True. Hair loss can be hereditary. Hereditary hair loss is called androgenetic alopecia, or for males, male pattern baldness, and for females, female pattern baldness. Androgenetic alopecia occurs when a hair follicle sheds, and the hair that replaces it is thinner and finer than what was there previously. The hair follicles continue to shrink and eventually hair stops growing altogether. However, contrary to popular belief, hereditary hair loss is not only inherited from the maternal side – it can be passed down from either the mother’s or father’s genes – but is more likely to occur if both parents have this issue.
Take some time to read through our guide to female hair loss, which should give you an indication of what might be causing your problem and what you can do. You can contact The Belgravia Centre any time to arrange a free one-on-one consultation with a hair loss specialist. The good news is that most women’s hair loss conditions are treatable and can be prevented or reversed. Jump to more information on hair loss treatments for women. Please note that results may vary and are not guaranteed.
This just goes to show how DESPERATE the EUssr now is to keep our money and that is all they want, if they are making offers like this.The other reason is that once the UK has left the corrupt EUssr the ruling junta will have their hands full trying to stop any other serfdom's from trying to leave. In saying that the whole ponzi scheme will come crashing down vert soon.
Harmful lifestyle plus sure kinds of medications otherwise diseases can lead to hormonal imbalance in men. This inequity might trigger extreme secretion of DHT hormone. Consequently hair begins to fall off in droves. Superior testosterone is linked to hair loss. If you have genetic hair loss, what you inherit is hair follicles which enclose a senior sensitivity to DHT that is a hormone collected of single kind of testosterone.
Terrible diet may not be the reason of what is strictly defined as “balding”. Though, lack of essential nutrients for example proteins, vitamins, keratin, plus minerals can guide to harsh hair fall which could report to baldness. Fair meals make sure good furnish of nutrients to hair follicles. Furthermore, healthy food suppresses hormones for example DHT. Dihydrotestosterone otherwise DHT is a hormone which plays a main role in causing hairlessness in men.
Androgenic Alopecia: This affects both men and women, but is more common in men. This is also referred to as “male pattern baldness” and can affect men as early as their late teenage years or early twenties. Typically, this type of alopecia will produce a gradually receding hairline, which eventually results in loss or thinning of most of the hair on the scalp. This is the most common type of alopecia that causes early hair loss.
The blame can't be blamed solely on your hair care habits, either—if there's baldness anywhere in your family tree, you're at risk. Unlike male-pattern baldness, though, where patches of hair fall out over time, female hair loss means a reduction in hair volume, making transplantation extremely difficult. "The total number of hairs doesn't always decrease, but the diameter of each strand shrinks," says Kingsley. And too-thin hairs won't grow past a certain length—which explains the baby fuzz around my hairline.
As a last resort—or in extreme cases—you may want to consider a hair transplant. This process involves a surgeon removing either an entire strip of hair from your scalp, sewing the scalp closed, and then separating that strip of hair into thousands of tiny grafts, or shaving the scalp and removing only the hair follicles from the area. Both styles of hair transplant end in the follicles (or grafted hair strands) being placed inside tiny holed created in the scalp inside the balding area. New hair should grow naturally in the area. However, this process can be costly and there is always a chance that the transplant will fail and the follicles will not set and begin to produce new hairs. Your doctor will be able to discuss with you the chances of success based on your medical history and the severity of your hair loss.
Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
Just as pregnancy hormone changes can cause hair loss, so can switching or going off birth-control pills. This can also cause telogen effluvium, and it may be more likely if you have a family history of hair loss. The change in the hormonal balance that occurs at menopause may also have the same result. “The androgen (male hormone) receptors on the scalp becoming activated,” explains Mark Hammonds, MD, a dermatologist with Scott & White Clinic in Round Rock, Texas. “The hair follicles will miniaturize and then you start to lose more hair.”
Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like - if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size - with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.
Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time.
Alright everyone, try things in cycles of at least 4 weeks or so, then you will have the ability to notice what works for your hair and what does not.  Hopefully some of these tips will flow into your hair care regimen leading your thinning hair to blossom to its full potential.  For most of us this will not happen overnight (or in a week).  Don’t forget – Patience is a virtue, but it also means you have to wait!  Concentrate on doing the right things with your hair now, it will definitely pay off later!  Happy hair growing!!!
Widely trusted as a cause for losing hair in the mid 20s, is diet. We all know a bit about this as the media is full to the brim daily with articles and findings about diets, side-effects and the negative aesthetics of poor health choices. However it’s very much true; if you’re not getting enough regular nutrients into your digestive system, you’re not getting them anywhere near your hair follicles either. On the other hand, extreme dieting or general physical trauma may also be a reason for hair loss in the mid 20s, so care should always be taken to ensure a balanced diet and gradual, healthy weight loss with the support of a dietician, if needed.

Before you venture into the confusing world of Internet hair loss advice, you should first pay a visit to a hair loss specialist. The doctor will sit down with you and discuss your family and medical history, then take a look at your hair loss and make a recommendation. The doctor might recommend one of the following treatment options for young males who are experiencing hair loss:


There’s no single cause. Triggers range from medical conditions -- as many as 30 -- to stress and lifestyle factors, like what you eat. Your genes play a role, too. Sometimes doctors can’t find a specific reason. As a starting point, hair loss experts suggest you get tested for thyroid problems and hormone imbalances. Hair often grows back once the cause is addressed.

Harmful lifestyle plus sure kinds of medications otherwise diseases can lead to hormonal imbalance in men. This inequity might trigger extreme secretion of DHT hormone. Consequently hair begins to fall off in droves. Superior testosterone is linked to hair loss. If you have genetic hair loss, what you inherit is hair follicles which enclose a senior sensitivity to DHT that is a hormone collected of single kind of testosterone.


Temple hair transplantation is quite possible and in fact is one of the areas that makes the face much more youthful.  Although temple recession is generally seen in advanced stages of hair loss, thinning of the area could be seen much earlier.  Transplanting hair to the temple areas is more challenging than a other areas of scalp due to the steep angles and especial distribution of hair in the area.
I am 15 and I m shedding 30 hairs per day. My hair is good I would say, and back side is also not that bad. But hair keeps falling. WheneverI ran my head through the scalp I get 3 4 hairs. My mom doesn’t have that good hair, so does my maternal grand parents. But my father’s side have very good hair. Even my 60 y/o grandfather isn’t bald. What can I do help? Is it genetic?
Oral Medication: “In cases of androgenetic alopecia, finasteride is still the gold standard,” says Fusco. (Finasteride is the generic version of Propecia, which can be prescribed by your dermatologist and is also available via mail subscriptions.) Fusco says that even younger men can slow or delay hair loss by starting a daily finasteride prescription. “This medication works by inhibiting an enzyme that leads to hair loss,” she notes. “In clinical trials, 90 percent of the patients either gained hair or maintained their hair over a five-year period.”
Lichen planopilaris, a type of alopecia, occurs when a common skin condition, called lichen planus, affects the scalp. Lichen planopilaris may cause a dry, flaky rash to appear on the skin that causes hair on the scalp to fall out in clumps. The scalp may also become red, irritated, and covered in small white or red itchy, painful, or burning bumps.

What if I love male pattern baldness? What if I want to go bald? Since I was a little child I’ve always secretly desired to do so, but I didn’t dare openly admit it, fearing everyone would think I was crazy. My last year in college several of my classmates, all of them still in their 20s were losing hair. One classmate went male pattern bald in about one year. I felt sorry for them, but at the same time I was insanely jealous of them. I fought those feelings, but finally had to admit (to myself), that I loved male pattern baldness and I wanted to lose my hair. But I was afraid of what people would think and feared that no woman would want me. Silly me, all my balding classmates had steady girlfriends and the bald guy was engaged to one of the prettiest girls on campus. But would any girl want ME if I was bald? Then my hairline started to recede a little. I panicked, as I didn’t even have a steady girlfriend. When my hairline stopped receding, I was relieved, but at the same time, disappointed. After my wife and I were married, for decades I would check my hairline, hoping and praying for my hairline to recede and for a bald spot to develop in back. My wish finally came true in my early 50s, as I began to lose hair in front and in back. To my delight, my wife was thrilled that I was and begged me to just let myself go. I did and in less than two years I was totally hairless on top, with only the usual fringe on hair on the sides and back.

Another way to stimulate new follicle hair growth may be to work from within. If you're looking for a systemic solution to improve the health and happiness of your hair follicles and the skin around them, adding certain vitamin- and mineral-rich foods to your diet is a great place to start. Vitamins and minerals can keep keratin levels healthy, as do proteins, fatty acids and omega-3s. Look to nuts, avocados, biotin-rich whole grains, citrus, orange vegetables such as carrots and leafy greens like spinach to keep your locks looking full and healthy.

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