Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time.
Another way to stimulate new follicle hair growth may be to work from within. If you're looking for a systemic solution to improve the health and happiness of your hair follicles and the skin around them, adding certain vitamin- and mineral-rich foods to your diet is a great place to start. Vitamins and minerals can keep keratin levels healthy, as do proteins, fatty acids and omega-3s. Look to nuts, avocados, biotin-rich whole grains, citrus, orange vegetables such as carrots and leafy greens like spinach to keep your locks looking full and healthy.
An unhealthy scalp environment can play a significant role in hair thinning by contributing to miniaturization or causing damage.[citation needed] Air and water pollutants[citation needed], environmental toxins,[citation needed] conventional styling products and excessive amounts of sebum have the potential to build up on the scalp.[citation needed]. This debris can block hair follicles and cause their deterioration and consequent miniaturization of hair.[citation needed]. It can also physically restrict hair growth or damage the hair cuticle[citation needed], leading to hair that is weakened and easily broken off before its natural lifecycle has ended.[citation needed]
If you want shinier locks, use conditioner every time you wash. Bonus: Conditioner cuts down on friction and breakage when you brush your hair later. And did you know that you can use conditioner to wash your hair, sans shampoo? Since shampoo can be very harsh, it's a nice alternative once in awhile. Our experts in the Good Housekeeping Research Institute Beauty Labtried it and found that while conditioner may not do the deep cleaning most shampoos will, it will still leave your hair feeling and looking nice
A key aspect of hair loss with age is the aging of the hair follicle.[43] Ordinarily, hair follicle renewal is maintained by the stem cells associated with each follicle. Aging of the hair follicle appears to be primed by a sustained cellular response to the DNA damage that accumulates in renewing stem cells during aging.[44] This damage response involves the proteolysis of type XVII collagen by neutrophil elastase in response to the DNA damage in the hair follicle stem cells. Proteolysis of collagen leads to elimination of the damaged cells and then to terminal hair follicle miniaturization.
Before you venture into the confusing world of Internet hair loss advice, you should first pay a visit to a hair loss specialist. The doctor will sit down with you and discuss your family and medical history, then take a look at your hair loss and make a recommendation. The doctor might recommend one of the following treatment options for young males who are experiencing hair loss:

Other approaches to hair thinning include using cosmetic "camouflage" sprays and powders that cover the scalp with a color close to one’s own hair color, which reduces the contrast between hair and scalp and makes the hair loss less noticeable. Surgical hair transplants are an option, but you must have enough "donor" hair to spare at the back of your scalp. A new treatment approved by the F.D.A. uses low-level laser lights on the scalp but the benefit is “modest,” Dr. Mirmirani said.
Some hair loss is associated with stress although male pattern baldness is a genetic condition found in many men. If you find your hair is falling out in clumps or at unpredictable times, it is most likely to be the symptom of something else. This could be stress related but is unlikely to be caused by sexual frustration. The best thing to do is to see your GP for a check up.
I’m 23 years old and since I was 20 I realized I have a mild form of diffuse thinning hair (which by now, 3 years later has become a little bit worse). Ever since then I’ve been using Minoxidil being an on and off user due to the side effects I get, mostly dark circles under my eyes and bad facial skin. At the moment I m struggling finding the right dose, but the problem is that when I’m getting very good results I m also getting noticeable side effects and when I’m getting just small hair regrowth results I m also getting no side effects. The problem is that I’ve been looking for the past weeks for a solution to get good results and no side effects. I have finally found your website.

The important distinction between male pattern baldness and female pattern hair loss is that, whilst men may develop absolute baldness – when the damaged follicles can no longer function so hair growth stops, and the skin takes on a smooth, shiny appearance – this is rare in women. Women’s hair loss may become advanced, but true baldness – as men experience it – is highly unlikely.
Good hair adds to the personality of a person and its loss deeply affects most of the people suffering from its breakage or thinning, especially those in age group 20s and 30s as you have rightly pointed out. The breakneck pace of today’s world, unhealthy eating habits, illnesses all contribute to hair fall. Thanks for the informative article though..keep up the good work.

True. Hair loss can be hereditary. Hereditary hair loss is called androgenetic alopecia, or for males, male pattern baldness, and for females, female pattern baldness. Androgenetic alopecia occurs when a hair follicle sheds, and the hair that replaces it is thinner and finer than what was there previously. The hair follicles continue to shrink and eventually hair stops growing altogether. However, contrary to popular belief, hereditary hair loss is not only inherited from the maternal side – it can be passed down from either the mother’s or father’s genes – but is more likely to occur if both parents have this issue.
Treatment of pattern hair loss may simply involve accepting the condition.[3] Interventions that can be tried include the medications minoxidil (or finasteride) and hair transplant surgery.[4][5] Alopecia areata may be treated by steroid injections in the affected area, but these need to be frequently repeated to be effective.[3] Hair loss is a common problem.[3] Pattern hair loss by age 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females.[3] About 2% of people develop alopecia areata at some point in time.[3]
There are two types of identification tests for female pattern baldness: the Ludwig Scale and the Savin Scale. Both track the progress of diffused thinning, which typically begins on the crown of the head behind the hairline, and becomes gradually more pronounced. For male pattern baldness, the Hamilton–Norwood scale tracks the progress of a receding hairline and/or a thinning crown, through to a horseshoe-shaped ring of hair around the head and on to total baldness.
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
Hi Sahil. First thing is I don’t recommend shampooing, instead simply use 4 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar once per week. Secondly, if you are serious about saving your hair then you need to get your diet sorted. Eating ‘shitty’ food will only make things worse and make it basically impossible to stop your hair loss. There is a lot of information here about hair growth diets so I recommend reading those articles.
In males over 60, androgen receptor and aromatase levels were low and comparable in scalp with and without thinning in both frontal and occipital regions. The 5a -reductase type 1 and 2 levels were only slightly higher in males with thinning hair in both frontal and occipital regions, but the differences were not significant. Histologic and hormonal findings suggest that senescent thinning is a diffuse process that is histologically similar to Androgenetic Alopecia, but hormonally different and may not be entirely androgen dependent.
Similar to hitting the gym too often, restricting your diet in unhealthy ways can have severe consequences for your luscious locks. If you’re majorly restricting your daily calorie intake, this will slow down your metabolism and your bodily functions, including the growing cycle of your hair. Aside from that, your hair will be thirsty for those essential nutrients that it is no longer receiving. If you really must diet, start taking biotin supplements to maintain hair growth.
My hair has become slightly thicker in recent years due to trying out some other medications, and I have recently started using Regaine foam for women. I've had to come to terms with the fact I will never have thick hair, but it still gets me down now and then, especially when I go through periods of stress and it thins again. I found that about 6 months after I was hospitalised whilst travelling in Africa, and after the 2015 earthquake in Nepal (I was a volunteer there at the time) my hair suddenly thinned again, which is apparently common after traumatic events.

Widely trusted as a cause for losing hair in the mid 20s, is diet. We all know a bit about this as the media is full to the brim daily with articles and findings about diets, side-effects and the negative aesthetics of poor health choices. However it’s very much true; if you’re not getting enough regular nutrients into your digestive system, you’re not getting them anywhere near your hair follicles either. On the other hand, extreme dieting or general physical trauma may also be a reason for hair loss in the mid 20s, so care should always be taken to ensure a balanced diet and gradual, healthy weight loss with the support of a dietician, if needed.
Hair loss before, during or after menopause -- as well as after childbirth -- is commonly attributed to hormonal changes. And while most physicians agree that replacing these hormones can alleviate many of the other troubling symptoms of menopause, unfortunately, hormone replacement alone does not seem to radically alter a woman's "follicular fate," and can even sometimes make matters worse.
A substantially blemished face, back and limbs could point to cystic acne. The most severe form of the condition, cystic acne, arises from the same hormonal imbalances that cause hair loss and is associated with dihydrotestosterone production.[9] Seborrheic dermatitis, a condition in which an excessive amount of sebum is produced and builds up on the scalp (looking like an adult cradle cap), is also a symptom of hormonal imbalances, as is an excessively oily or dry scalp. Both can cause hair thinning.
Oh my receding hairline is so tied to hormones! I lost my first batch of my thick, beautiful hair when I was pregnant and the next after my hysterectomy….I am still thinning and, you are right, it does seem to worse when I am stressed. It does change how I feel about myself. Thank you for, as usual, bringing great solutions and suggestions Ellen. I will definitely check some out!
Hair transplantation may help IF the woman has enough donor hair. So far the only way we do hair transplant is to take hair from one area of the scalp – usually at the back, near the nape of the neck, and move some of that hair to the thinning areas. Women however, don’t lose in the pattern as men do and have thick hair still in the back. While we may lose in a pattern--widening part--we also thin diffusely, over all our scalp. So hair transplant might not be right for everyone. Again, this is a discussion with a dermatologist and a hair transplant surgeon. But have realistic expectations of what it can and cannot accomplish. I go into this at length in my book.
It's no myth that excess stress can literally make your hair fall out. How does this happen? Well, it can raise androgen (male hormone) levels, which in turn can causes hair loss. "Stress may also trigger scalp problems, such as dandruff, disrupt eating habits and mess with the digestive system – all of which can have a negative impact on hair" says Anabel.
Hair loss affects over 60% of men before the age of 30. Some men begin to experience hair loss, commonly a result of male pattern baldness, in their late teens or early twenties. If you have recently looked in the mirror to discover you have thinning, balding patches of hair or a receding hairline, you may be suffering from male pattern baldness or another condition that’s causing your hair loss. Hair loss is not entirely understood by researchers, though, so slowing balding and regenerating hair growth can sometimes be a guessing game. There are options, though, for young men who experience mild to severe hair loss. You should start by trying to understand the cause of your baldness to help you decide which treatment (or lifestyle changes) may work for you.
Women also have more of an enzyme called aromotase, which stimulates the hormone production of estrone and estradiol; both of these hormones act against hair follicle-shrinking DHT. In most women, aromotase production is significant at the front of the hairline—meaning loss here is less common in women, but not impossible. Sometimes, conditions such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, infertility and menstrual irregularities may interfere with estrone and estradiol production so that loss at the hairline occurs.
Interestingly, although we blame this loss on androgens, if you measure a woman’s circulating level of testosterone in the blood after menopause, it is generally not elevated. So how can low androgens cause androgentic alopecia? It’s partly still a mystery, but we do have some clues. Compared to the dramatic decrease in circulating estrogen, testosterone is relatively high. After menopause, the ratio of the hormones becomes reversed.
A hair growth cycle consists of three phases. During the anagen phase, hair grows actively. This phase may last for years. During the catagen phase, hair stops growing and separates from its follicle, which is the structure beneath the skin that holds the hair in place. The catagen phase lasts about 10 days. During the telogen phase, the follicle rests for two or three months, and then the hair falls out. The next anagen phase begins as a new hair grows in the same follicle. Most people lose 50 to 100 hairs per day as part of this natural cycle.
One-fifth of men will experience significant hair loss by age of 20(!), and that percentage grows proportional to age. Bauman says that significant loss increases steadily with age: 30 percent will experience it in their 30s, 40 percent in 40s, and so on. “This math proves true for men into their 90s,” he says. “If you go unchecked but have maintained most of your hair by middle age, then your sensitivity to DHT is probably on the low side, meaning you have a slower rate of male pattern hair loss going on.”
The pluck test is conducted by pulling hair out "by the roots". The root of the plucked hair is examined under a microscope to determine the phase of growth, and is used to diagnose a defect of telogen, anagen, or systemic disease. Telogen hairs have tiny bulbs without sheaths at their roots. Telogen effluvium shows an increased percentage of hairs upon examination. Anagen hairs have sheaths attached to their roots. Anagen effluvium shows a decrease in telogen-phase hairs and an increased number of broken hairs.
The important distinction between male pattern baldness and female pattern hair loss is that, whilst men may develop absolute baldness – when the damaged follicles can no longer function so hair growth stops, and the skin takes on a smooth, shiny appearance – this is rare in women. Women’s hair loss may become advanced, but true baldness – as men experience it – is highly unlikely.
While hair loss can happen for a wide variety of reasons, the most likely culprit is something called androgenic alopecia, better known as male pattern baldness. Contrary to the locker room tall tales you’ve probably heard, your hair won’t thin because you’ve worn a baseball cap everyday for a year straight, or because you use hair gel to style your hair. Male pattern baldness is solely due to genetics and male sex hormones.
While hair loss isn’t the most common symptom of anemia caused by an iron deficiency, there are still a number of people suffering from this predicament. According to a study in the Journal of Korean Medical Science, those affected by this specific type of hair loss can experience symptoms for a number of years. Since iron plays a crucial role in producing hemoglobin, a compound that carries oxygen to cells, this can mess with your body’s ability to carry out essential processes like hair and nail growth. You can make up for this deficiency by upping your protein intake, or by taking iron supplements—though you should talk to a doctor before doing this. And for more on the essential nutrients you may need, check out these 50 Best Supplements on the Planet.
Harmful lifestyle plus sure kinds of medications otherwise diseases can lead to hormonal imbalance in men. This inequity might trigger extreme secretion of DHT hormone. Consequently hair begins to fall off in droves. Superior testosterone is linked to hair loss. If you have genetic hair loss, what you inherit is hair follicles which enclose a senior sensitivity to DHT that is a hormone collected of single kind of testosterone.
Localized or diffuse hair loss may also occur in cicatricial alopecia (lupus erythematosus, lichen plano pilaris, folliculitis decalvans, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, postmenopausal frontal fibrosing alopecia, etc.). Tumours and skin outgrowths also induce localized baldness (sebaceous nevus, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma). 

If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)
It seems more than a little unfair, doesn’t it? You’d think the one thing we could count on was that hair loss or male or female pattern balding was an older person’s game. No way would hair loss occur as early as the mid 20s, right? Well, unfortunately for some of us, we may start seeing hair loss as early as our late teens and 20s, making for a very distressing discovery so soon after finishing school. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30 and there are a great many theories as to why hair loss in mid 20s might happen.
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The data is inconclusive as to whether or not cortisone shots actually work at re-growing hair, but I do know one woman who gets them frequently and says they have really helped her. Cortisone shots are given at the scalp, and the Mayo Clinic suggests they should not be given more often than every six weeks. While I know of some women who have had luck with acupuncture for hair loss, the British Acupuncture Society states that there is no evidence that acupuncture can treat hair loss as a specific symptom; however, it might help with the underlying problem. (For example, acupuncture can help treat lupus, which can cause hair loss.)
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