Beyond Hormones, Contributing Factors -- When it comes to menopausal hair loss, lower female hormones might be the most common culprit, but other contributing factors may need to be considered as well. These risk factors include genetic predisposition, unusual levels of stress, other hormonal imbalances -- like thyroid, for example -- nutritional or iron deficiencies, crash diets, as well as illness, medications and your surgical history. A detailed medical history and diagnostic tests are obtained as an important part of a medical hair-loss evaluation to identify risk factors.
One-fifth of men will experience significant hair loss by age of 20(!), and that percentage grows proportional to age. Bauman says that significant loss increases steadily with age: 30 percent will experience it in their 30s, 40 percent in 40s, and so on. “This math proves true for men into their 90s,” he says. “If you go unchecked but have maintained most of your hair by middle age, then your sensitivity to DHT is probably on the low side, meaning you have a slower rate of male pattern hair loss going on.”
The notion that only middle-aged men experience baldness isn’t only false, it’s damaging. It causes 20-year-old men to feel self-conscious about their hair loss, meaning that most of them refuse to confront the reality that their hair is thinning. Accepting this reality is the first step towards preventing hair loss from accelerating and getting worse.
Some things are harder to let go of than others. However, wisdom helps us nurture deeper feelings of self-esteem and a positive spirit. If you find that you are experiencing sudden hair loss, be sure to see your physician. In the meantime, get creative with a new fun style that can make your hair loss less noticeable.  It is not exactly “modern medicine”, but today we have access to hair extensions, clip-ons, scalp camouflages,  and oodles of accessories that can add the appearance of length and fullness without anyone knowing.
Some things are harder to let go of than others. However, wisdom helps us nurture deeper feelings of self-esteem and a positive spirit. If you find that you are experiencing sudden hair loss, be sure to see your physician. In the meantime, get creative with a new fun style that can make your hair loss less noticeable.  It is not exactly “modern medicine”, but today we have access to hair extensions, clip-ons, scalp camouflages,  and oodles of accessories that can add the appearance of length and fullness without anyone knowing.
Women also have more of an enzyme called aromotase, which stimulates the hormone production of estrone and estradiol; both of these hormones act against hair follicle-shrinking DHT. In most women, aromotase production is significant at the front of the hairline—meaning loss here is less common in women, but not impossible. Sometimes, conditions such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, infertility and menstrual irregularities may interfere with estrone and estradiol production so that loss at the hairline occurs.
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I've just had my second baby and the hair loss is always in the back of my mind. The shedding has started again and the areas that lost more hair before are still much thinner. People often think that hair loss is something you can put a cream on and you'll be cured but a lot of the time that's not the case. Sometimes, you just have to face that it's never going to grow back and deal with that.
I too have spent 25 year researching what causes balding. I have found other reasons that cause balding that I believe to be true. The common link for all humans balding on the vertex of the head is the mandible is in a class 2 skeletal position. This causes the condyle to occlude the superficial temporal artery where it passes between the base of the skull and the condyle. In a normal healthy temporalmandibular joint, there is sufficient clearance for the superficial temporal artery. The skeletal class 2 position places the teeth, the mandible, the Ramos and the condyle in a retrognathic position. In conclusion, the dislocated class 2 skeletal jaw is functioning outside the glenoid fossa in a distalized position, towards the back of your head occluding on the superficial temporal artery. This causes the only connection the vertex follicle pad has to the body to be cut off ending the growth cycle of the hair follicle pad of the vertex.
Treatment of pattern hair loss may simply involve accepting the condition.[3] Interventions that can be tried include the medications minoxidil (or finasteride) and hair transplant surgery.[4][5] Alopecia areata may be treated by steroid injections in the affected area, but these need to be frequently repeated to be effective.[3] Hair loss is a common problem.[3] Pattern hair loss by age 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females.[3] About 2% of people develop alopecia areata at some point in time.[3]
I sat down, switched on my iPad and started to talk, explaining to people what I had personally been going through, what Alopecia was, showing them my hidden bald patches, and then sang a song as music had helped me through the toughest of times. I posted it on Facebook before really thinking. I had never been a public person, but for some reason, there was no doubt in my mind that my act of self-help had to be done in a very public way. We are all different, and this was my way of dealing with it.
I too have spent 25 year researching what causes balding. I have found other reasons that cause balding that I believe to be true. The common link for all humans balding on the vertex of the head is the mandible is in a class 2 skeletal position. This causes the condyle to occlude the superficial temporal artery where it passes between the base of the skull and the condyle. In a normal healthy temporalmandibular joint, there is sufficient clearance for the superficial temporal artery. The skeletal class 2 position places the teeth, the mandible, the Ramos and the condyle in a retrognathic position. In conclusion, the dislocated class 2 skeletal jaw is functioning outside the glenoid fossa in a distalized position, towards the back of your head occluding on the superficial temporal artery. This causes the only connection the vertex follicle pad has to the body to be cut off ending the growth cycle of the hair follicle pad of the vertex.
There are also other visual cues that women can look for over time. Although men’s hair tends to recede from the forehead or the crown of the head, women tend to notice thinning on the top third to one half of the scalp. Sometimes their frontal line stays intact, says Nicole Rogers, MD, of Old Metairie Dermatology in Metairie, La. Women may see a part that is gradually becoming wider or see more of their scalp than normal when their hair is pulled back.
Calling all gym fanatics—if you’re spending more time in the gym than you’re spending at home, it may be time to reevaluate your regimen. According to a study in the Annals of Dermatology, the more strenuous a participant’s workout routine was, the more likely they were to experience hair loss later in life. If you’re pumping iron more than a few hours a day, it’s going to affect your hairline. So, if you’d like to keep your hair, cutting a few hours of gym time every week may be the trick.
When undergoing this therapy, the doctor will extract blood from you in the same way as if you were getting a blood test. Your blood is then placed in a centrifuge which separates out the red blood cells from the plasma -which contains the platelets. Once the plasma is extracted and concentrated, a small needle is used to inject it into the treatment area. Pain and potential side effects are minimal, and you can go back to your daily routine afterwards with no restrictions on driving or activities.
For women going through menopause, the cause of hair loss is almost always related to hormonal changes. However, there are many other factors that can contribute to hair loss during menopause. These include extremely high levels of stress, illness, or a lack of certain nutrients. Diagnostic blood tests that can help rule out other causes of hair loss include thyroid tests, and/or a complete blood count.
If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)
There’s no single cause. Triggers range from medical conditions -- as many as 30 -- to stress and lifestyle factors, like what you eat. Your genes play a role, too. Sometimes doctors can’t find a specific reason. As a starting point, hair loss experts suggest you get tested for thyroid problems and hormone imbalances. Hair often grows back once the cause is addressed.
Daily hair counts are normally done when the pull test is negative. It is done by counting the number of hairs lost. The hair from the first morning combing or during washing should be counted. The hair is collected in a clear plastic bag for 14 days. The strands are recorded. If the hair count is >100/day, it is considered abnormal except after shampooing, where hair counts will be up to 250 and be normal.[citation needed]
You know, in this day and age, we can be really brutal with our hair, all these sprays, and heating tools, and hair dryers, and hair straighteners, so just watch what you're actually doing with your hair because if it's starting to get a little thinner and a little more brittle, then using a lot of these harsh treatments can speed up the deterioration process.  
There's a chance you're genetically predisposed to hair thinning, which means you may see a progressive, gradual reduction in hair volume. "In these instances, certain hair follicles are sensitive to male hormones – and this sensitivity causes follicles to gradually shrink and produce slightly finer and shorter hairs with each passing hair growth cycle." Explains Anabel.
Also new is the HairMax Laser Comb. It's a red light therapy hairbrush-like device that increases circulation and the biological march that makes hair. It's only approved in men (though some women are using it) and in my experience, is not as good as minoxidil. But in one study, 45% of users reported improvement after eight weeks, and 90% saw improvement after 16 weeks.
There are also autoimmune disorders--alopecia areata is considered an autoimmune disorder--that can cause the hair to fall out in round smooth patches. Some men, women and children lose their hair this way or lose all their hair over their entire body. This is a devastating condition that can often go into remission and the hair will grow back as suddenly as it disappeared. This is particularly difficult for young women and I interviews some women who told me they contemplated suicide.
Hey everyone, now I know “I am not my hair” (we all know how India sang it, lol), but I sure don’t want to lose it!  Some of us have issues with areas of thinning hair – I am no exception to that!  I have had thinner hair in my temple area for as long as I can remember having hair.  In my case, it’s hereditary (says the family dermatologist), however, I am sure that my lack of knowledge concerning the treatment and management of my hair over the years has contributed to this minor setback.  Many of us who have experienced hair loss in the temple area have reached this point due to a number of activities.  Thus the following list comes into play:
Take some time to read through our guide to female hair loss, which should give you an indication of what might be causing your problem and what you can do. You can contact The Belgravia Centre any time to arrange a free one-on-one consultation with a hair loss specialist. The good news is that most women’s hair loss conditions are treatable and can be prevented or reversed. Jump to more information on hair loss treatments for women. Please note that results may vary and are not guaranteed.

What to do: Like anemia, simple supplementation should help the problem. So can dietary changes. Find natural vitamin B in fish, meat, starchy vegetables, and non-citrus fruits. As always, eating a balanced diet plentiful in fruits and vegetables as well as lean protein and “good” fats such as avocado and nuts will be good for your hair and your overall health.


When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”
Beginning at perimenopause in their 40s, women may see the effects of menopause on hair, including thinning hair, dull, graying and hair loss. Experts previously thought hair loss due to menopause was caused by low estrogen levels. But new research shows that hair loss in older women is likely due to lower levels of both estrogen and progesterone, causing hair follicles to thin and hair to fall out.
A substantially blemished face, back and limbs could point to cystic acne. The most severe form of the condition, cystic acne, arises from the same hormonal imbalances that cause hair loss and is associated with dihydrotestosterone production.[9] Seborrheic dermatitis, a condition in which an excessive amount of sebum is produced and builds up on the scalp (looking like an adult cradle cap), is also a symptom of hormonal imbalances, as is an excessively oily or dry scalp. Both can cause hair thinning.
While warm water opens a hair's cuticle to allow shampoo and conditioner to do their job, cold water helps to close the cuticle and seal in moisture from the conditioner — which helps your hair look shiny and healthy. So, by all means, take a warm shower, but at the end, rinse with cold water. If you really don't like cold showers, stylists recommend pouring one cup apple cider vinegar mixed with two cups water over hair after washing and conditioning. Vinegar is a gentle exfoliator that removes product build-up and dandruff from the scalp.
Great article and helpful information. When I was a younger age I didn’t worry about having hair loss, but I knew already that thinning hair can affect men and women of any age. Hair loss can happen for all sorts of reasons, for example, it can be related to diet, exercise, illness, stress, disease, or hereditary causes, like you mentioned in this post. Toppik is a hair building fiber treatment that may overcome it. Thanks a lot. .
Topical chemical treatments are used by many to help stimulate regrowth, although some believe that blood flow and circulation to old or weak hair follicles can be stimulated with only the fingertips and some common vitamin-rich items. Popular remedies for encouraging new hair follicle growth include combining a rich carrier oil like jojoba, coconut or olive oil with agents like vitamin-dense or mineral-dense aloe vera gel, potato juice, cinnamon, neem leaves or certain essential oils.
Hair transplant are a well-liked way to reinstate hair these days as the effects are totally natural-looking plus involve hair return using hair from the patient’s own head. Hair transplant can be performing on both men plus women moreover are only not possible if Alopecia Totalis has previously occurred (total hair loss throughout the death of the hair follicles).
Sudden weight loss is a form of physical trauma that can result in thinning hair. This could happen even if the weight loss is ultimately good for you. It’s possible that the weight loss itself is stressing your body or that not eating right can result in vitamin or mineral deficiencies. Loss of hair along with noticeable weight loss may also be a sign of an eating disorder such as anorexia or bulimia.
According to psychologist Dr. Ana Fonseca, “For women, self-esteem and self-concept are the reflex of social influence, which can act as a source of conflict and misfit, with repercussions on body image and health. The relationship with the hair often includes anxiety about its general condition, if it’s thinning and falling out, or going gray. Hair is valued in connection with beauty and femininity, sexuality and attractiveness, so when losing it, people are affected negatively in their self-esteem and self-image. Hair loss threatens our vanity, how much we value ourselves and is usually seen as unattractive and often associated with being unwell or aging. It is recognized that there are also emotional factors associated with hair loss so it can mean psychological discomfort.”
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) restores post-menopausal oestrogen levels to average pre-menopausal levels. This reduces your risk of osteoporosis and alleviates menopausal symptoms, including hair thinning and/or loss. However, it is very important that you weigh the risks with the benefits. Studies have shown that HRT increases your chance of breast cancer, heart problems, mood swings, uterine cancer and endometriosis.
Be consistent. Dr. Robert Bernstein, a respected hair restoration surgeon suggests staying on Propecia and minoxidil for 12 months because hair growth may take a long time to become visible. Bernstein also notes that although Propecia and minoxidil were only proven to regrow hair on the top of the scalp, they "definitely can" work for the temple region so long as there is still hair remaining in that area.
Finasteride (Propecia) is a medicine taken in tablet form that partially blocks the effects of the male hormones (an 'anti-androgen'). Propecia has been shown to halt further hair loss and promote re-growth of scalp hair in approximately 80 per cent of patients after three to six months. The treatment benefits also stop when you stop taking the medication. Only available on prescription and is available on some NHS primary care trust lists for certain conditions.
Needless to say, that relationship didn't last long, as I began to lose my sense of trust and self-confidence that he could find me attractive in this condition. I didn't dare ask my friends for a second opinion, because I didn't want them to scrutinize my scalp. After another frustrating physical (with no answers), I consulted my dermatologist. Instead of dismissing my concerns as mere vanity, he immediately wrote up requests for endocrine blood tests, which prompted my general practitioner to finally cave and grant me a specialist referral.
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Guys are indeed losing hair earlier than their fathers. Four trichologists who spoke to the Times of India say while it’s normal to lose 50 to 100 hairs a day, more than that could indicate a health issue. Consider that the body typically sheds hair in response to extreme mental or physical stress, with hair loss that shows up several months after the event.
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.

For women going through menopause, the cause of hair loss is almost always related to hormonal changes. However, there are many other factors that can contribute to hair loss during menopause. These include extremely high levels of stress, illness, or a lack of certain nutrients. Diagnostic blood tests that can help rule out other causes of hair loss include thyroid tests, and/or a complete blood count.


When your hormones are out of step, your hair truly suffers. In a study in the International Journal of Women’s Dermatology, researchers found that birth control can cause a relative increase in androgen levels that then causes a corresponding increase in DHT production, which researchers believe shrinks the hair follicle. If you want to be on birth control but have a predisposition for genetic hair loss in your family, researchers suggest steering clear of birth controls that release higher amounts of estrogen and progestin like progestin implants, hormone injections, skin patches, and vaginal rings.
When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!” 

If follicles receive the necessary stimulus and nutrients from the body, it can stabilize hair loss during menopause and strengthen existing hair growth. This is why it’s important to nourish thinning hair follicles with the right nutrients, including marine extracts, vitamins (including B vitamins such as Biotin and Niacin) and minerals (such as Zinc), to promote hair growth during menopause. A good diet, as well as a nourishing shampoo and conditioner that is gentle on dry, aging hair, are top tips for how to treat menopause-related hair loss.
About the coffee… mmmh, I’m not totally sure to be honest. Having never drunk coffee myself I haven’t researched and experimented on its effects, but yes something that is highly acidic is not going to help. Perhaps replacing it with green tea and filtered or bottled water would be a better alternative, or another tea that is high in antioxidants such as cold brewed hibiscus (which has more antioxidants than any other tea.)
If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)
There's a chance you're genetically predisposed to hair thinning, which means you may see a progressive, gradual reduction in hair volume. "In these instances, certain hair follicles are sensitive to male hormones – and this sensitivity causes follicles to gradually shrink and produce slightly finer and shorter hairs with each passing hair growth cycle." Explains Anabel.
I have been loosing hair for 3 years now. It started at the temples, but actually it falls from anywhere in the scalp. I notice that my hair is pretty thin and weak. I’ve changed my diet in the last month and a half, but it keeps falling almost the same. I have a pretty stressful life, but I’m not sure if that’s the only reason (because on non stressful periods of time, the falling is almost the same). The thing is that I notice that my scalp is almost always itchy, a lot of the hairs that falls, falls with a grease yellow or white bulb at the end. I have to wash my hair almost every day I read that it could be Telogen effluvium, but it has been falling for so long that I don’t think that it’s the reason… It is starting to be noticeable the lack of density, specially in the front. I should be more active as well, but even if I do exercise, I keep feeling that my hair is thin and breaks and falls easily… I would really like to regrow what I’ve lost, but my main focus right now is to stop the hair from falling. Do you think I could have some sort of skin condition that is making this happen? (I have visited 2 dermatologist but both said it was AGA without almost looking at my scalp). Or is this also possible in typical Male pattern baldness?
Also my energy levels are high. I remember that at the beginning i did heavy cardio and interval training which helped me lose weight fast but i did not realize how biotin played a part in my weight loss until AFTER i stopped working out. I continue to take biotin every day and now that I am no longer on my diet i eat whatever i want and i don’t gain weight. It appears the biotin may be keeping my metabolism to the level it was at during my training. So i highly recommend it to you.
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