Fashionista: What causes female hair to thin? Candace Hoffmann: There can be a number of reasons women lose hair. Female pattern hair loss (androgenetic alopecia) is the most common. How do you know if this might be the reason for your hair loss? Look around at your family. If you have parents, relatives with thinning hair or who are frankly bald --male or female--there is a good chance you could have the propensity as well. That being said, for women, it’s not so cut and dry. Men can easily discern such a connection, women can have multiple reasons for hair loss--sometimes, it's temporary hair loss (telogen effluvium). Here are some common reasons for hair loss in women that are not genetic:
Thank you, Ellen, for this great post; it is nice to know there are others who are experiencing the same (irritating!) things. I’ve had to deal with hair issues since my 20’s after having my thyroid removed, it is NOT fun having chunks of hair come out in the shower! My thyroid (I replace with desiccated pig thyroid – much better for me than synthetic) levels are fine, but I will look into my iron levels.

Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia areata (mild – medium level) usually shows in unusual hair loss areas, e.g., eyebrows, backside of the head or above the ears, areas the male pattern baldness usually does not affect. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and hair either thins out or falls out. Female-pattern hair loss occurs at the frontal and parietal.

Some hair loss is associated with stress although male pattern baldness is a genetic condition found in many men. If you find your hair is falling out in clumps or at unpredictable times, it is most likely to be the symptom of something else. This could be stress related but is unlikely to be caused by sexual frustration. The best thing to do is to see your GP for a check up.


I noticed I was going bald, I panicked and turned the internet upside down in search of a solution and tried lots of products and weird things but none worked. a friend who used to tease me about the hair (in a bid to tease me further) bought a product from Africa during his travels and he mockingly gave me as a present.I tried it and the result is unbelievable. infact he had to call his contacts in Africa to get in touch with the manufacturers. I know how frustrating and confidence-sapping being bald is that’s why I took this painstaking mission to reveal to any who wants to try it. you can contact the manufacturers on (abiomoigho@gmail.com)I hope this message helps.
For those who don’t plan on counting their hair every day, there are ways to know when hair is thinning or being lost at a higher rate. Roberts tells WebMD that women will see a difference. When waking up in the morning, there may be an usually large amount on your pillow. When you comb your hair (especially without tugging, which can pull the hair out), more than normal will be left in the comb.
Women expect hot flashes and mood swings to occur during "the change," but many women are unaware and unprepared for the fact that they may also find themselves facing hair loss and thinning during this time as well. After menopause, about 40 percent of women experience hair thinning, which is almost the same rate as men. But if this is true, why don't we see bald women on the street? Unlike male pattern hair loss, hereditary hair loss in women is usually a lot subtler and it can be easy to miss the early warning signs. Women tend to experience thinning over a wide area of scalp, and for many, the first signs and symptoms may come in the form of a smaller ponytail, a wider part line or excessive shedding during brushing and showering. 

"It's a good thing you came in when you did," she told me on my first visit. "It gets more complicated, and possibly dangerous, the older you get, especially if you want to have a baby." Apparently, hair loss during pregnancy is a big red flag. "One out of 50 women is diagnosed with hypothyroidism while pregnant. It's still the most common cause of mental retardation in children," says Liao. And the idea that thinning hair is simply a symptom of menopause is a myth: The average age for women dealing with thinning hair is 25 to 35.
Symptoms of gradual hair loss are sometimes hard to notice until nearly half the hair is gone. The most obvious signs are a thinning of the temples and hairline recession. Otherwise, the hair loss can be more widespread and balanced. This steady shedding is called “invisible baldness”, since the hair becomes gradually less dense until suddenly it is perceptible to the naked eye. “In general, hair loss is a chronic, progressive condition that gets worse over time without treatment,” Bauman says.
My age is 20 ... I have excessive hairloss for over an year... 2 years ago I had full head of hair... But now I notice that I'm going bald..!!! My father is also bald.. My uncles are bald too.... I know my hairfall is for family reason... I don't want to become bald.. What can I do??? Which type of treatment should I take ???? Plzz help... READ MORE
Topical chemical treatments are used by many to help stimulate regrowth, although some believe that blood flow and circulation to old or weak hair follicles can be stimulated with only the fingertips and some common vitamin-rich items. Popular remedies for encouraging new hair follicle growth include combining a rich carrier oil like jojoba, coconut or olive oil with agents like vitamin-dense or mineral-dense aloe vera gel, potato juice, cinnamon, neem leaves or certain essential oils.
So you can look at balancing hormones by things like Menopause Support, have plenty of fermented soya foods in your diet. Look at things that maybe Black Cohosh as well, if they're appropriate. You could start to eat fermented soya foods, and these are foods that are eaten on a regular basis in the Far East, so it would be things like tempeh, and miso, and maybe some kinds of fermented tofu as well.  

I went to a lot of these sites trying to read about what was happening, and if I would go completely bald or if my hair would grow back. I never seemed to get any answers and it made me even more anxious about my life in general… worrying that I would be bald. I can assure you that if you commit to becoming a healthier person all around your hair will most likely stop falling out and go back to its original state. The most important thing is to STOP STRESSING, allow yourself and your body to heal and your hair will follow.
Yes, the frontal hair loss is more as compared to other sides, but I can notice thin hair on sides and back too. Now, I can see my scalp easily when I comb, this shows that hair is thinning and falling from other sides too, I would say it’s androgenetic alopecia because I am losing hair from temples and the hair line is also receding. My scalp feels itchy from nearly 5 years and my hair fall problem started nearly 18 months ago…
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