People have between 100,000 and 150,000 hairs on their head. The number of strands normally lost in a day varies but on average is 100.[8] In order to maintain a normal volume, hair must be replaced at the same rate at which it is lost. The first signs of hair thinning that people will often notice are more hairs than usual left in the hairbrush after brushing or in the basin after shampooing. Styling can also reveal areas of thinning, such as a wider parting or a thinning crown.[citation needed]
I took your quiz. Sadly, the answers I gave were as of my early 20s, when my hairline started receding and had that ‘M shape’. I receded to Norwood 3, but mysteriously, the receding stopped there. The only explanation I can think of is that I gave up junk food and started eating more fresh fruit and veggies and started regular running and hiking. I lost a lot of weight and felt great. Until my early 50s, when suddenly my hair began to rapidly recede and I developed a bald spot in back. I panicked, thinking that I might have a serious medical condition, since I had not changed my good living habits. My doctor reassured me that I was still very healthy. Next stop: hair restoration specialist. He informed me that I had male pattern baldness and would eventually go completely bald on top. To my surprise and delight, my wife was thrilled that I was going bald and begged me to just let nature take its course. She confessed to me that she had always secretly wished that I would someday go bald and was delighted that her wish was finally coming true. Reluctantly, I agreed to just let myself go bald. Two things amaze me: First, how fast I went bald (less than two years to go completely bald on top). It was as if I was making up for lost time. Secondly, the sudden change in my attitude. Whereas I was panicked my wife would hate it, now thanks largely to her encouragement, I couldn’t go bald fast enough. It was a huge turn of for my wife and me. She still loves to sneak up behind me while I’m relaxing watching TV news or sports and kiss me on top of my bald head. I haven’t just adjusted to being bald. I really love being bald and wouldn’t ever try to regrow my hair. Not at my age. I’m in my 70s and it is quite normal for someone my age to be bald. The information you email to me I will pass on to my two sons, who, like me, face the likelyhood that they will eventually go bald. They are in their mid 30s and their hairlines are beginning to recede a little at their temples. I chose to go bald. They don’t have to. Oh, a third thing amazes me: that there are women out there who prefer bald men to men with a full head of hair. Thank God I am married to one of those women.
Although it’s generally only prescribed as a last resort for menopausal symptoms, hormone replacement therapy is a common and very effective hair loss treatment for some women — as long as they are menopausal or post-menopausal and are not at higher risk for adverse effects from HRT. It's most often prescribed for women who have androgenetic alopecia, also called pattern baldness. Hormone replacement therapy has a number of benefits for both general health and symptom management, but also a number of side effects — which range from unpleasant to dangerous.
Hi David, I understand where you are coming from. Losing hair at a young age is not a nice experience. Luckily, there is a lot more you could be doing besides the shampoo. Honestly I don’t know how much this will help in the long term. To get you started, you’ll probably have to adjust a few things in your diet and lifestyle to stop further loss/ regrow lost areas. A simple thing to get started would be to use a dermaroller (or even better a dermastamp) along the hairline. Remember though, pattern baldness starts from the inside out. It’s basically a sign that your body is out of balance. So try to sort that out as well.

Each hair develops from a follicle — a narrow pocket in the skin — and goes through three phases of growth. Anagen (A), the active growth phase, lasts two to seven years. Catagen (), the transition phase, lasts about two weeks. During this phase, the hair shaft moves upward toward the skin's surface, and the dermal papilla (the structure that nourishes cells that give rise to hair) begins to separate from the follicle. Telogen (C), the resting phase, lasts around three months and culminates in the shedding of the hair shaft.
Hot flashes, fatigue, weight gain, low libido and mood swings are all symptoms commonly associated with menopause. As if these aren’t all enough to deal with, research links menopause to female hair loss. According to Lovera Wolf Miller, M.D., member of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS), noticeable hair thinning (androgenetic alopecia) occurs in about half of all women by age 50, although it may begin any time after puberty. "Alopecia is actually as common in women as it is in men, but it's less apparent because it rarely causes balding," Dr. Miller says.

If you are losing patches of hair in an apparently random manner you may have alopecia, a condition where a person (male or female) loses patches of hair from parts of their body. In extreme cases this may affect all of the hair on the body. Alopecia is thought to have hereditary and autoimmune factors (where the body mistakenly attacks itself). It is not the same as male pattern baldness.
Hair grows in three different cycles: anagen, catagen, and telogen. About 90% of the hair on the head is in the anagen, or growth phase, which lasts anywhere from two to eight years. The catagen, or transition phase, typically lasts 2-3 weeks, during which the hair follicle shrinks. During the telogen cycle, which lasts around two to four months, the hair rests.
Another sneaky culprit of hair loss is alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that confuses the hair for an attack on the immune system. According to Marc Glashofer, MD, a dermatologist in New York City, if your hair loss is occurring in round circles on your scalp, then you most likely are a victim of alopecia. Alopecia can be treated with steroids and even over-the-counter products like Rogaine.
A key aspect of hair loss with age is the aging of the hair follicle.[43] Ordinarily, hair follicle renewal is maintained by the stem cells associated with each follicle. Aging of the hair follicle appears to be primed by a sustained cellular response to the DNA damage that accumulates in renewing stem cells during aging.[44] This damage response involves the proteolysis of type XVII collagen by neutrophil elastase in response to the DNA damage in the hair follicle stem cells. Proteolysis of collagen leads to elimination of the damaged cells and then to terminal hair follicle miniaturization.
Some hair loss is associated with stress although male pattern baldness is a genetic condition found in many men. If you find your hair is falling out in clumps or at unpredictable times, it is most likely to be the symptom of something else. This could be stress related but is unlikely to be caused by sexual frustration. The best thing to do is to see your GP for a check up.
In men, male pattern baldness usually begins with thinning hair in specific areas. Typically these are around the crown, along the top of the head and/or a receding hairline. Men’s hair loss may involve one, two or all three of these patterns, and they may join up to form larger bald patches. A measuring tool known as The Norwood Scale provides a guide to “how far gone” a man’s hairloss is.
One-fifth of men will experience significant hair loss by age of 20(!), and that percentage grows proportional to age. Bauman says that significant loss increases steadily with age: 30 percent will experience it in their 30s, 40 percent in 40s, and so on. “This math proves true for men into their 90s,” he says. “If you go unchecked but have maintained most of your hair by middle age, then your sensitivity to DHT is probably on the low side, meaning you have a slower rate of male pattern hair loss going on.”
Research suggests that hair loss during menopause is caused by your female hormones declining, which in turn triggers the increased production of androgens (or male hormones). Androgens are the most common cause of hair loss in women, just like they are in men. Androgens can reduce the ability of your hair follicles, causing them to producer weaker hair until they eventually produce none at all. We call this type of hair loss androgentic alopecia or “female pattern baldness”. 

Stress: It’s no secret that stress can cause hair loss and an increase in the stress hormone cortisol may make you more likely to suffer from conditions like telogen effluvium, which causes more hairs than normal to fall out, or trichotillomania, a psychological condition in which a person pulls out their hair, like as a nervous (or stress-induced) habit.


It's important that you keep a lookout for these signs so that you'll be able to spot hair loss before you lose most of your hair. The good news is that there are a number of treatment plans available that can stop and, in some cases, even reverse hair loss. Creating a regimen filled with healthy foods, biotin supplements, and clinically-tested medicines like minoxidil and finasteride could be your best bet for stopping hair loss.
Ahh this is so helpful and it makes a lot of sense! Thank you so much for this! I’ll definitely take all this on board! Honestly since my hair started thinning a few months ago I’ve been so panicked and confused as to why it was happening. I’m quite vain and I’ve always loved my hair so I’ve been really worried about keeping my curly locks! My friend actually recommended getting a wig made. Apparently you can have small pieces and extensions to cover up certain thinning parts of your hair without losing all your hair (and I’m definitely leaning towards this option). I read about a company called Optima Hair (they’re located near where I live), has anyone else used them? They look good but I don’t know much about it if I’m honest so I’d appreciate any advice or recommendations people could give me! x
Though it used to be popular to prescribe hormone replacement therapy (HRT) to treat this fundamental imbalance, persistent links to blood clots and stroke have caused most healthcare professionals to rethink this drastic option. Many agree that the most effective approach is to combine a few changes in lifestyle with alternative treatment options.

Hi David, I understand where you are coming from. Losing hair at a young age is not a nice experience. Luckily, there is a lot more you could be doing besides the shampoo. Honestly I don’t know how much this will help in the long term. To get you started, you’ll probably have to adjust a few things in your diet and lifestyle to stop further loss/ regrow lost areas. A simple thing to get started would be to use a dermaroller (or even better a dermastamp) along the hairline. Remember though, pattern baldness starts from the inside out. It’s basically a sign that your body is out of balance. So try to sort that out as well.
For those who don’t plan on counting their hair every day, there are ways to know when hair is thinning or being lost at a higher rate. Roberts tells WebMD that women will see a difference. When waking up in the morning, there may be an usually large amount on your pillow. When you comb your hair (especially without tugging, which can pull the hair out), more than normal will be left in the comb.
Chronic Telogen Effluvium, also known as Diffuse Hair Loss, is similar to temporary Telogen Effluvium in its causes, the main difference being that hair loss can be prolonged. The reason for this is that the underlying cause of the hair loss has not been dealt with. In order to treat Chronic TE effectively it is important not only to treat the condition with an optimum course of treatment, but also to look at the medical issues causing the problem.
Reducing caffeine and alcohol consumption, exercising regularly, and practicing stress reduction techniques such as yoga or meditation can also help promote regenerative hair growth. Taking care to not pull or twist hair in destructive ways and avoiding other physical traumas such as harsh processing techniques or excessive heat in styling will also help to protect hair.
One especially effective supplement has emerged in the last few years, and Fusco calls it “a real game changer.” It’s a multivitamin blend called Nutrafol for Men. (Fusco is not paid to endorse it.) She says they many of her patients have “seen regrowth, thicker hair and a healthier scalp after using it. It’s packed with botanical ingredients that help multiple causes of poor hair health, including hair loss from inflammation, stress, hormone imbalance, genetics, and environmental toxins.”
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
Hair follicles function in phases. The growth phase, called the anagen phase, is when your follicles are producing new keratin cells. After the anagen phase, a short transition phase, called the catagen phase, takes place. In this phase, the new cell becomes attached to the existing hair shaft. Then, in the last phase, called the telogen phase, the follicle rests. If a follicle prematurely enters the telogen phase (without entering or completing the catagen phase), the hair will fall out. It is normal to lose between 50 and 100 hairs per day. However, losing more or noticing patches of thinning hair may be the reason for concern. The medical term for hair loss is alopecia and there are several different types of alopecia that affect men. Some of these types include:
Bunch of weakasses in the comment section, I literally started rocking a near bald look at around 16. All of a sudden girls talked to me more at school and got more looks for some reason. All you need is the confidence to rock a bald head, I’m 21 now and can tell my hairline is receiding but it doesn’t effect me at all, I like being bald, I look better that way, y’all need to grow some cojones
There are also autoimmune disorders--alopecia areata is considered an autoimmune disorder--that can cause the hair to fall out in round smooth patches. Some men, women and children lose their hair this way or lose all their hair over their entire body. This is a devastating condition that can often go into remission and the hair will grow back as suddenly as it disappeared. This is particularly difficult for young women and I interviews some women who told me they contemplated suicide.

your situation is very common and I assume you have had a thorough investigation ruling out any medical condition for your hair thinning. Minoxidil may restore some vellus hair but unlikely to result in significant terminal hair. As long as it is not getting worse, then a hair transplant procedure may be the answer for you to restore the feminine shape to your hairline 


Ever since I was around 13, I've had bad dandruff and a dry scalp, and thus, have created bad habits of scratching my scalp a lot. Recently, I've stopped, as I don't want to lose any more hair, I use Head and Shoulders, and a tar based shampoo, I also put coconut oil on my scalp now. I would like to know if dandruff, dry scalp, and itching can cause balding, and if so, is it temporary, the... READ MORE

I'm 21 yr old boy suffering from hairloss..... since 18 i was suffering from excessive hairfall.Even my family are bald(but they suffored after 45 yrs) nearly 100-200 hair will fall daily, i am using minoxidil 10% from 1.5yrs but results was not good. i have tried all vitamine,biotine medicine for years but still condition is not good. while comb also 5 to 10 hair will fall off. Sir pls help... READ MORE

When women have female pattern hair loss, the pattern of the shedding is completely different. While it is still located around the top of the head, it affects the vertex more diffusely, as opposed to being confined to defined areas. While thinning can certainly be significant, the chances of it forming noticeable bald areas are much less likely than with men. Instead, hair tends to look less voluminous than it once did, and the severity of the loss is recorded on something called the Ludwig Scale, which can be seen here.
My hair started thinning out . I saw my grandpa and my dad and thought, that won’t be me. It was pretty stressful and scary in my early 20’s but I found a ton of research with the help of this website I found. I wasn’t sure if Rogine was a good choice for me, then I saw the side effects and decided it definitely wasn’t. I hope you find some good advice with the website I did, Fullheadhelp.com, only $5, check it out. 

A key aspect of hair loss with age is the aging of the hair follicle.[43] Ordinarily, hair follicle renewal is maintained by the stem cells associated with each follicle. Aging of the hair follicle appears to be primed by a sustained cellular response to the DNA damage that accumulates in renewing stem cells during aging.[44] This damage response involves the proteolysis of type XVII collagen by neutrophil elastase in response to the DNA damage in the hair follicle stem cells. Proteolysis of collagen leads to elimination of the damaged cells and then to terminal hair follicle miniaturization.
I have struggled with my hair for a long time now. I am quickly approaching my 40s and I have bad hair quality. Recently, I have also noticed that my hair has stopped growing as it used to. A few years ago I went to the salon on a monthly basis. Now, it takes me almost two months before I even need to cut my hair! I am desperate and I really need help right now. Hair is one of the most important parts of a woman and I don’t want to give up on this one. I went to the doctors but they didn’t found anything wrong with me. The exams I took showed that I am healthy and there’s no reason for this to even happen to me. Please, I really need hair advice urgently!!!!!!!!!!!!
When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”
I'm a 19-year-old male. Six months ago, I noticed that my hair was falling out much quicker than it ever had before. I have always had pretty thin hair, but now it is thinner than ever, and my hairline has been receding very quickly. I have a feeling that i could have a case of telogen effluvium, considering the fact that I have been extremely stressed the last year and a half. When I pull a... READ MORE
Hair growth and loss is a complex chemical process, affected by enzymes and hormones. AGA begins in puberty, when male sex hormones known as androgens shorten the anagen, or growth, phase of hair follicles. When this phase is shortened, hair dies sooner than usual and sheds. In a woman, hereditary hair loss is slightly more complex. In men’s AGA, an enzyme known as 5-a reductase combines with testosterone to produce dihydrotestosterone, or DHT—a hormone responsible for the shrinking and disappearance of hair follicles. Women have about half as much 5-a reductase as men do, which means their hair loss tends to be diffuse, rather than concentrated at the hairline.
The basic approach is to stimulate hair growth at the root by giving your body the support it needs. Many women find that a nutrient-rich diet, high-quality nutritional supplements and a little stress relief can do wonders. If you find your hair loss is connected to a thyroid, hormonal, or stress imbalance, a specific herbal combination product will help to rebalance your body naturally.
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