2) I’m 32 and my hairline has receded from the temples on back, which started when I was 15. Since then my hair has thinned out a bit on top. The hairless at 15 started abruptly… Strands upon strands fell over over a period of a few months… Which was mortifying to me! However, since then my hair loss has slowed dramatically… Since I have these small peach fuzz like hairs on my temples, and although it’s been 17 years since the hair size shrunk drastically…. Do you think it’s possible to revive these hairs into thicker, terminal hairs?
Extreme hair loss should be discussed with your healthcare practitioner. But in the case of mild to moderate thinning hair, which is usually a result of thyroid imbalance, hormonal imbalance, nutritional deficiencies, or elevated stress hormones, most women can get relief naturally — without having to resort to a new hair cut or experiment with hair thickening creams!
Reducing your stress should be your number one priority as it sounds like this could have been the original trigger. If you feel like your scalp is greasy then this could be to do with your diet. Take account of what you eat and try to remove fried foods or any foods containing vegetable oils. Processed foods in general should be avoided ideally. Seeing a doctor to find out what kind of hair loss yours is, is a good first step. Then you’ll be able to find the right treatment for it.
well, where as i remember i have thin hairs naturally but i wasn’t really sure if i am getting bald or anything. I was using sunsilk and then for some reasons i tried another shampoo and i found my hairs falling too bad. its been almost two weeks and i have no idea why my hairs are falling so much i ain’t using that shampoo any ore and is there any hair oil which will help….
FPHL is very common and increases with age and varies across ethnic groups. Although it can happen at any age, the condition occurs most commonly following the menopause. This does not mean that hormones alone are to blame, although oestrogen may have a protective role, helping to keep hair in the ‘growing phase’. Age itself is a factor and whilst women can take care of their hair cosmetically, it is one aspect of the ageing process we cannot always control. Genetics are important too and you may notice a family link with both male and female hair loss. Occasionally times of acute stress on the body will influence hair growth, eg illness, emotional stresses and crash dieting. Some medications may have an influence too.
Hormonal imbalance. Hair loss during menopause and perimenopause is common due to declining estrogen levels. As estrogen levels fall, the resulting imbalance between estrogen and testosterone can cause thinning hair on certain areas of the head that are sensitive to androgens, commonly referred to as male pattern baldness. The same imbalance can also contribute to unwanted hair growth on the chin and face.
Chris Deoudes has been a fitness writer since 2006, with articles published at Bodybuilding.com and Avant Labs. He is certified as a personal trainer by the American Council on Exercise and as a performance sport nutrition specialist by the International Sports Sciences Association. He has a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice and business management from the University of Florida. 
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