Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
Just as pregnancy hormone changes can cause hair loss, so can switching or going off birth-control pills. This can also cause telogen effluvium, and it may be more likely if you have a family history of hair loss. The change in the hormonal balance that occurs at menopause may also have the same result. “The androgen (male hormone) receptors on the scalp becoming activated,” explains Mark Hammonds, MD, a dermatologist with Scott & White Clinic in Round Rock, Texas. “The hair follicles will miniaturize and then you start to lose more hair.”
my mother is abit bald in the center but she 56 and she said she got lots of hair when she was my age, my dad hair is fine and so are my brother. So genetic is unsure. Thirdly, i dont have stress, i got no gf, no one to support,…..i dont give a shit what other say or think. Stress is tick. I dont smoke, drink, or use birth control. i dont have disease or illness, i never been to the doctor.
While it's normal to lose between 50 and 100 strands of hair a day, serious hair loss — medically termed alopecia — is a sign that something is wrong with our body, says trichologist Dr Apoorva Shah. "As a reaction to an incident of extreme mental or physical stress, the body typically sheds hair after a gap of three months. For instance, if you are down with food poisoning, the mal-absorption of nutrients during this period can lead to hair loss in the next few months. So, it's important to jog your memory to pinpoint the cause."
While women accept that menopause is a natural and unavoidable stage of womanhood, coming to grips with its effects, especially with female hair loss due to menopause, can be very difficult. Often, hair loss is one of the first and more depressing symptoms of menopause that a woman notices and it can have a profound effect on her sense of femininity, sexuality and self-confidence.
It seems more than a little unfair, doesn’t it? You’d think the one thing we could count on was that hair loss or male or female pattern balding was an older person’s game. No way would hair loss occur as early as the mid 20s, right? Well, unfortunately for some of us, we may start seeing hair loss as early as our late teens and 20s, making for a very distressing discovery so soon after finishing school. Approximately 25 percent of men begin balding by age 30 and there are a great many theories as to why hair loss in mid 20s might happen.
Mine has definitely thinned, but I am absolutely not willing to take drugs for it, or for any of the relatively minor issues that I’ve experienced. Although I do know men who have had great experience with hair drugs. Still, I don’t like putting more stuff into my body if I don’t have to. I’d like better hair, but my self-image doesn’t depend on it.
If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)
THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

I went to a lot of these sites trying to read about what was happening, and if I would go completely bald or if my hair would grow back. I never seemed to get any answers and it made me even more anxious about my life in general… worrying that I would be bald. I can assure you that if you commit to becoming a healthier person all around your hair will most likely stop falling out and go back to its original state. The most important thing is to STOP STRESSING, allow yourself and your body to heal and your hair will follow.


Ever since I was around 13, I've had bad dandruff and a dry scalp, and thus, have created bad habits of scratching my scalp a lot. Recently, I've stopped, as I don't want to lose any more hair, I use Head and Shoulders, and a tar based shampoo, I also put coconut oil on my scalp now. I would like to know if dandruff, dry scalp, and itching can cause balding, and if so, is it temporary, the... READ MORE
Unfortunately for men, there’s a four in seven chance of receiving the baldness gene which means hair loss could occur for you really at anytime during adulthood. Many of our clients have recognised that their fathers or their mothers if the balding is on the female side, started at a certain point in their lives and that the time-scales are similar or identical.
Ever feel like pulling your hair out?  Menopause can do that to you.  Hot flashes, weight gain, crankiness—but wait—there’s more!  Just when the mind reels from those menopausal symptoms, one day you notice your hair is not quite as thick and shiny as it used to be.  In fact, there are some tiny patches where you can actually see scalp!  What is going on?

Be consistent. Dr. Robert Bernstein, a respected hair restoration surgeon suggests staying on Propecia and minoxidil for 12 months because hair growth may take a long time to become visible. Bernstein also notes that although Propecia and minoxidil were only proven to regrow hair on the top of the scalp, they "definitely can" work for the temple region so long as there is still hair remaining in that area.
Known as alopecia, hair loss occurs when hair follicles, or pores, either die or become slow in their ability to produce and push a protein called keratin through the follicle and, eventually, outside the skin. This often occurs naturally with age, although certain factors such as genetics, thyroid or hormonal conditions, side effects of medications, or other illnesses can affect hair cell production and growth. This often begins to appear as overall thinning or patchiness of the hair, or a recession of the hairline, usually starting at or around the temples.

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Another method is to wear a hat or a hairpiece—a wig or toupee. The wig is a layer of artificial or natural hair made to resemble a typical hair style. In most cases the hair is artificial. Wigs vary widely in quality and cost. In the United States, the best wigs—those that look like real hair—cost up to tens of thousands of dollars. Organizations also collect individuals' donations of their own natural hair to be made into wigs for young cancer patients who have lost their hair due to chemotherapy or other cancer treatment in addition to any type of hair loss.

The pluck test is conducted by pulling hair out "by the roots". The root of the plucked hair is examined under a microscope to determine the phase of growth, and is used to diagnose a defect of telogen, anagen, or systemic disease. Telogen hairs have tiny bulbs without sheaths at their roots. Telogen effluvium shows an increased percentage of hairs upon examination. Anagen hairs have sheaths attached to their roots. Anagen effluvium shows a decrease in telogen-phase hairs and an increased number of broken hairs.


I’m 23 years old and since I was 20 I realized I have a mild form of diffuse thinning hair (which by now, 3 years later has become a little bit worse). Ever since then I’ve been using Minoxidil being an on and off user due to the side effects I get, mostly dark circles under my eyes and bad facial skin. At the moment I m struggling finding the right dose, but the problem is that when I’m getting very good results I m also getting noticeable side effects and when I’m getting just small hair regrowth results I m also getting no side effects. The problem is that I’ve been looking for the past weeks for a solution to get good results and no side effects. I have finally found your website.
If suffering from hair loss in their mid 20s, most people tend to opt for non-invasive hair loss prevention treatments, usually in the form of a lotion or tablet. Other options may include hair transplant, especially if it’s likely that the hair loss in mid 20s will be permanent, that is to say the hair loss is progressive and unrelenting. Hair transplants are a popular way to restore hair these days since the effects are completely natural-looking and involve hair restoration using hair from the patient’s own head. Hair transplant can be performed on both men and women and is only impossible if Alopecia Totalis has already occurred (complete hair loss through the death of the hair follicles).
True. Hair loss can be hereditary. Hereditary hair loss is called androgenetic alopecia, or for males, male pattern baldness, and for females, female pattern baldness. Androgenetic alopecia occurs when a hair follicle sheds, and the hair that replaces it is thinner and finer than what was there previously. The hair follicles continue to shrink and eventually hair stops growing altogether. However, contrary to popular belief, hereditary hair loss is not only inherited from the maternal side – it can be passed down from either the mother’s or father’s genes – but is more likely to occur if both parents have this issue.
When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”
If you're going through or about to enter the menopause, changes in your body may also have an effect on your hair. "Hair loss becomes more prevalent leading up to and after the menopause" reveals Anabel. That being said, "it's important to realise that our hair ages, and as we get older, hair naturally gets finer. It's a totally normal part of the ageing process."

my mother is abit bald in the center but she 56 and she said she got lots of hair when she was my age, my dad hair is fine and so are my brother. So genetic is unsure. Thirdly, i dont have stress, i got no gf, no one to support,…..i dont give a shit what other say or think. Stress is tick. I dont smoke, drink, or use birth control. i dont have disease or illness, i never been to the doctor.
The notion that only middle-aged men experience baldness isn’t only false, it’s damaging. It causes 20-year-old men to feel self-conscious about their hair loss, meaning that most of them refuse to confront the reality that their hair is thinning. Accepting this reality is the first step towards preventing hair loss from accelerating and getting worse.

Alternative approaches involve little to no risk and can be an extremely effective means of treating hair loss. This level of approach includes several different therapies. Herbal remedies are the most prominent, though in addition women may turn to such techniques scalp massage in order to help stimulate hair follicles and regenerate hair growth. These can be valid and effective options, though most women find that herbal remedies are the easiest alternative treatment to follow, as the others require a greater time and monetary commitment. In addition, herbal remedies are the only viable option to treat the hormonal imbalance directly at its source.
There’s no single cause. Triggers range from medical conditions -- as many as 30 -- to stress and lifestyle factors, like what you eat. Your genes play a role, too. Sometimes doctors can’t find a specific reason. As a starting point, hair loss experts suggest you get tested for thyroid problems and hormone imbalances. Hair often grows back once the cause is addressed.
Menopause is a natural biological process that all women experience at some point in their lives. During this time, the body goes through numerous physical changes as it adjusts to fluctuating hormone levels. Many women have unpleasant symptoms during menopause, including hot flashes, mood swings, and insomnia. Hair loss is another common occurrence.
Trichotillomania, classified as an “impulse control disorder,” causes people to compulsively pull their hair out. “It’s sort of like a tic, the person is constantly playing and pulling their hair,” says Dr. Glashofer says. Unfortunately, this constant playing and pulling can actually strip your head of its natural protection: hair. Trichotillomania often begins before the age of 17 and is four times as common in women as in men.
In my youth, stylists would always tell me, "Wow, you've got a lot of hair." So much so that I took my lush mane for granted—perming, straightening, and bleaching my way through my teens. But everything changed during my sophomore year of college, as I found myself pulling more and more tangles out of my brush and strands from the shower drain. The compliments stopped and the worry began. I jealously examined the girl next to me on the subway. Why couldn't I see through to the roots on her scalp, too?
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