In other words, no one’s truly safe from the condition. But even in the face of these seemingly insurmountable odds, not all hope is lost for your precious locks. To show your hair some TLC (and prevent further thinning), look out for these surprising culprits—and combat them accordingly. And if you need a quick way to mask any thinning hair, just check out the 15 Best Haircuts for Looking Instantly Younger.
Viviscal has Biotin in it — and calcium. And vitamin C. It also contains shark cartilage, oyster extract, and a “marine complex” — which is apparently the secret elixir that gives the ingredient its power. The U.S. National Library of Medicine published an article with a double-blind placebo controlled study that showed the efficacy of this product; “significantly more” women who took Viviscal than the placebo noticed hair growth after 90 days, and even more after 180 days. Now it’s true that the funding for the study was provided by the makers of Viviscal, but double-blind is double-blind. Furthermore, in an entirely separate article, Beauty Editor writer Katrina Persad tried Viviscal for 6 months and documented her results in a quite convincing photo essay and article that showed fairly dramatic results — and Viviscal (as far as I know) did not pay her for her trouble. (Though she does seem to have gotten the product for free, which is quite a perk; the tablets cost about $40 a month.)
Hi Gabriel, the hair rinse tonic is a daily thing, it won’t clean the hair, it just provides ingredients to stimulate growth. We don’t want to clean the hair too much. So if you use the shampoo once or twice per week then there’s no real need to use the tonic on the same day. I would certainly stop using Alpecin C1, the SLS in it will damage your scalp.
Common Mistakes to Avoid -- When it comes to hair loss, missing the early signs is one of the first mistakes many women make. A staggering 50 percent loss can occur before it's noticeable to the human eye. The other common mistake women (and men, for that matter) make when trying to treat their hair loss is not giving enough time for therapy to work and not tracking their results properly. Just like hair loss, initial changes in hair regrowth take time and can be subtle before they are noticeable to the naked eye.
my mother is abit bald in the center but she 56 and she said she got lots of hair when she was my age, my dad hair is fine and so are my brother. So genetic is unsure. Thirdly, i dont have stress, i got no gf, no one to support,…..i dont give a shit what other say or think. Stress is tick. I dont smoke, drink, or use birth control. i dont have disease or illness, i never been to the doctor.
Take some time to read through our guide to female hair loss, which should give you an indication of what might be causing your problem and what you can do. You can contact The Belgravia Centre any time to arrange a free one-on-one consultation with a hair loss specialist. The good news is that most women’s hair loss conditions are treatable and can be prevented or reversed. Jump to more information on hair loss treatments for women. Please note that results may vary and are not guaranteed.

Hair loss can start as soon as puberty ends, depending on your hereditary sensitivity to DHT. That phrasing is key: Bauman stresses that it is not DHT production that causes hair loss, it's the inherited sensitivity to DHT that causes the loss. Those with high sensitivity will be the first to experience a weakening in their follicles. This results in thinning around the crown and hairline, and lighter pigment in the hair. Behaviors that increase DHT production will magnify the loss depending on sensitivity. These behaviors include smoking, creatine supplements, resistance and weight training exercise, stress, and taking anabolic steroids or testosterone hormone replacement.
Women also have more of an enzyme called aromotase, which stimulates the hormone production of estrone and estradiol; both of these hormones act against hair follicle-shrinking DHT. In most women, aromotase production is significant at the front of the hairline—meaning loss here is less common in women, but not impossible. Sometimes, conditions such as hirsutism, ovarian abnormalities, infertility and menstrual irregularities may interfere with estrone and estradiol production so that loss at the hairline occurs.

Fusco says that if your family has a history of androgenetic alopecia or thinning hair, you should make an appointment with your dermatologist and discuss the best prevention or treatment methods. Some of them will require routine check ins. Additionally, “maintain a healthy diet and proper hair and scalp hygiene to keep the existing hair healthy,” she says. (Try a hair-strengthening shampoo like Brickell for Men’s. Starting a supplement like Nutrafol for Men, plus annual visits to the dermatologist will be most beneficial in slowing or delaying the onset of alopecia.
I explained to Emily that The Iowa Writers’ Workshop wasn’t really in the business of handing out medical degrees, but that since my hair was also thinning, and since I was curious, and since I supposed we weren’t the only two women on the planet who wanted some answers, I’d do some research. This is what I came up with for how to handle hair loss during perimenopause.
Lack of sleep can push your body into a state of distress, which can actually halt hair growth. So, get some zzz’s and your hair will gladly thank you. According to Wellness Magazine, one out of every six Americans feel sleep-deprived. If your minimal sleep time is leaving you feeling exhausted, you can be sure that your hair follicles are feeling the same way.
Hormones are often not the only things to blame when it comes to female hair loss. Several factors can be at play. If female hair loss runs in your family, you may be more likely to experience hair loss during menopause. Other hormonal imbalances, nutritional or iron deficiencies, medication, illness, conditions (like thyroid disease and anemia), diets, and surgeries can also contribute to hair loss.

Iron supplements. Iron deficiency could be a cause of hair loss in some women . Your doctor may test your blood iron level, particularly if you're a vegetarian, have a history of anemia, or have heavy menstrual bleeding. If you do have iron deficiency, you will need to take a supplement and it may stop your hair loss. However, if your iron level is normal, taking extra iron will only cause side effects, such as stomach upset and constipation.
Minoxidil is the only medically-proven hair loss treatment suitable for women that has been shown to regrow hair and stop female pattern hair loss. Whilst it is licensed by the MHRA and approved by its US counterpart, the FDA for the treatment of genetic hair loss in both men and women, minoxidil is also known to be effective for other hair loss conditions.
Research suggests that hair loss during menopause is caused by your female hormones declining, which in turn triggers the increased production of androgens (or male hormones). Androgens are the most common cause of hair loss in women, just like they are in men. Androgens can reduce the ability of your hair follicles, causing them to producer weaker hair until they eventually produce none at all. We call this type of hair loss androgentic alopecia or “female pattern baldness”.
In men, finasteride (originally marketed as Proscar) is approved for hair loss associated with androgens. In one study, 62% of women also taking oral contraceptives containing the synthetic progestin drospirenone reported improvement. So it may be effective for female hair loss in the setting of increased androgen. But studies are limited and it is harmful to the male fetus so should not be used by women thinking about becoming pregnant or who are pregnant. 

Hot flashes, fatigue, weight gain, low libido and mood swings are all symptoms commonly associated with menopause. As if these aren’t all enough to deal with, research links menopause to female hair loss. According to Lovera Wolf Miller, M.D., member of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS), noticeable hair thinning (androgenetic alopecia) occurs in about half of all women by age 50, although it may begin any time after puberty. "Alopecia is actually as common in women as it is in men, but it's less apparent because it rarely causes balding," Dr. Miller says.
The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.

Trich is under-researched in the UK, with the NHS pretty pushed for resources to try and treat it. I was referred to CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) when I was 10, which just made me more anxious and depressed. Trying to identify Trich-triggers is incredibly difficult; they can be emotional, physical, situational and differ vastly between individuals. For me, currently it's mostly when I come up against confusing stuff in my PhD research; anxiety and stress also induce it.


The patch got larger and I went to the doctor again, who informed me that because I have a family history of auto immune disease (my mother has rheumatoid arthritis) this may have affected my hair loss. Once again, there was nothing to be done except take care of myself and wait for it to grow back. Again, I was so self-conscious of it being seen by other people. It's still growing back now and I have to straighten the curl down.
Bunch of weakasses in the comment section, I literally started rocking a near bald look at around 16. All of a sudden girls talked to me more at school and got more looks for some reason. All you need is the confidence to rock a bald head, I’m 21 now and can tell my hairline is receiding but it doesn’t effect me at all, I like being bald, I look better that way, y’all need to grow some cojones
Menopause is a natural biological process that all women experience at some point in their lives. During this time, the body goes through numerous physical changes as it adjusts to fluctuating hormone levels. Many women have unpleasant symptoms during menopause, including hot flashes, mood swings, and insomnia. Hair loss is another common occurrence.
Is this a bigger issue for the current generation? (I'm 27, and it feels like so many of my friends suffer from this.) Is it a nutritional thing? That’s an excellent question and I don’t know the answer. 30 million women suffer from hair loss. That’s 1 in 4 before age 50 and 2 in 4 after age 50. We might be more hyper aware of hair loss at an earlier age now just as we are more hyper aware of a need for a facelift at earlier ages. Thing that we used to take for granted, we do not. Genetic hair loss will manifest itself in the 20s, if not sooner. The good news is that there are more things available to help than before. Will they work for everyone, no. However, topical minoxidil (Rogaine) is good for helping maintain what you have. So at the first sign of thinning hair, it’s not bad to use even if the hair loss is temporary.
Some women notice that their hair becomes thinner or patchy at menopause. For most women it's not as dramatic as male hair loss but it can be a very sensitive subject that can badly knock your confidence. The pattern in women tends of gradual thinning - maybe a more obvious scalp or a wider parting. Thinning can be seen on the top of the scalp as well as at the sides. Some women notice hair on their pillow, in the shower or it may come out in clumps while brushing.
Stress can affect every aspect of your health in sneaky ways, and the thinning of your precious locks is but one. In this study published in the American Journal of Pathology, researchers found that stress can actually cause your hair cycle to be pushed into a common type of hair loss called telogen effluvium. At the peak of your stress, you can actually shock the hair cycle, repeatedly pushing it into the shedding phase. However, this type of hair loss doesn’t have to be permanent. Engaging in activities or practices that release these feelings of tension and worry can bring your hair back to a healthy routine—one that doesn’t clog your drain. To cool down and relax for good, bone up on these 32 Secrets of a Stress-Proof Life.
A hair growth cycle consists of three phases. During the anagen phase, hair grows actively. This phase may last for years. During the catagen phase, hair stops growing and separates from its follicle, which is the structure beneath the skin that holds the hair in place. The catagen phase lasts about 10 days. During the telogen phase, the follicle rests for two or three months, and then the hair falls out. The next anagen phase begins as a new hair grows in the same follicle. Most people lose 50 to 100 hairs per day as part of this natural cycle.
One of the most common yet least talked about symptoms of menopause, hair loss can be devastating for the millions of women who suffer from it. Americans spend upwards of a billion dollars per year on hair loss treatments. According to the American Hair Loss Society, 99% of these treatments are unfortunately ineffective. Most women do not want to sit back and let their hair fall out slowly without taking action. Luckily, there are alternative solutions that are safe and effective for the multitudes of women experiencing hair loss.
According to psychologist Dr. Ana Fonseca, “For women, self-esteem and self-concept are the reflex of social influence, which can act as a source of conflict and misfit, with repercussions on body image and health. The relationship with the hair often includes anxiety about its general condition, if it’s thinning and falling out, or going gray. Hair is valued in connection with beauty and femininity, sexuality and attractiveness, so when losing it, people are affected negatively in their self-esteem and self-image. Hair loss threatens our vanity, how much we value ourselves and is usually seen as unattractive and often associated with being unwell or aging. It is recognized that there are also emotional factors associated with hair loss so it can mean psychological discomfort.”
Trichotillomania, classified as an “impulse control disorder,” causes people to compulsively pull their hair out. “It’s sort of like a tic, the person is constantly playing and pulling their hair,” says Dr. Glashofer says. Unfortunately, this constant playing and pulling can actually strip your head of its natural protection: hair. Trichotillomania often begins before the age of 17 and is four times as common in women as in men.
*all photos are models and not actual patients.If you are interested in a prescription product, Hims will assist in setting up a visit for you with an independent physician who will evaluate whether or not you are an appropriate candidate for the prescription product and if appropriate, may write you a prescription for the product which you can fill at the pharmacy of your choice.
Eating a balanced, low-fat diet is your best defense against hair loss. Make sure you include an adequate amount of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables in every meal. It’s also important to incorporate mono-saturated oils, such as olive oil and sesame oil, into your diet. Drinking green tea and taking vitamin B6 and folic acid supplements may help restore hair growth as well. Essential fatty acids also play a crucial role in maintaining hair health. These fatty acids can be found in the following foods:

These three levels of approaches are not mutually exclusive. A woman may use different approaches at different times or any combination of them depending on the duration and severity of symptoms. Today, more and more women find that dealing with menopause symptoms is best accomplished via a combination of healthy lifestyle and alternative treatments.


Before you venture into the confusing world of Internet hair loss advice, you should first pay a visit to a hair loss specialist. The doctor will sit down with you and discuss your family and medical history, then take a look at your hair loss and make a recommendation. The doctor might recommend one of the following treatment options for young males who are experiencing hair loss:
Hypothyroidism (an under-active thyroid) and the side effects of its related medications can cause hair loss, typically frontal, which is particularly associated with thinning of the outer third of the eyebrows (also seen with syphilis). Hyperthyroidism (an over-active thyroid) can also cause hair loss, which is parietal rather than frontal.[23][unreliable medical source?]
Tightly pulling back your hair in ponytails, cornrows or braids can lead to traction alopecia, characterized by hair breakage along the hairline and temples. Women athletes who often wear their hair pulled back are particularly at risk. A change in hairstyle usually helps; however, hair loss may be permanent if the tight styling techniques have been used too long. 

7.Iron Deficiency in women, the number-one cause of iron deficiency is too-heavy periods, says Jacques Moritz, M.D., director of gynecology at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Roosevelt in New York City. “They lose too much blood, replace about half of it, and then lose too much again the following month,” he says. “It’s like filling up a car with a small hold in the tank.” Your period should only fill two to three tablespoons each month. Try the tampon test: If you have to change your tampon more frequently than every two hours, talk to your gyno.


When you think of hair loss, men usually come to mind. You don’t see a lot of women walking around with receding hairlines or shaved heads as a result of hair loss. However, nearly 40% of women experience some form of hair loss by age 60. This hair loss is usually triggered by every woman’s favorite period of life: menopause. Since it’s a lot less socially acceptable for women to show signs of hair loss, balding can be emotionally devastating for many women.
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When women have female pattern hair loss, the pattern of the shedding is completely different. While it is still located around the top of the head, it affects the vertex more diffusely, as opposed to being confined to defined areas. While thinning can certainly be significant, the chances of it forming noticeable bald areas are much less likely than with men. Instead, hair tends to look less voluminous than it once did, and the severity of the loss is recorded on something called the Ludwig Scale, which can be seen here.
Hello Alex, I see no reason that those supplements would have made things worse. The only issue might be if the fish oil was oxidised before you consumed it, which can be common with some of the supplements (did you keep it in your fridge.) Anyway, even then I don’t think that could be the reason. Another possible answer is that the older (unhealthy) hairs are being replaced by healthier hairs, hence shedding. However, this probably isn’t the reason either. Your hair loss development is probably just continuing like normal with little affect from the supplements. Seeing a doctor might be a good idea as things will continue to get worse most likely. Please take a look at our Hair Equilibrium program and Grogenix product range. That’s probably how you’ll have most success getting your hair back.
If you're going through or about to enter the menopause, changes in your body may also have an effect on your hair. "Hair loss becomes more prevalent leading up to and after the menopause" reveals Anabel. That being said, "it's important to realise that our hair ages, and as we get older, hair naturally gets finer. It's a totally normal part of the ageing process."
Great article and helpful information. When I was a younger age I didn’t worry about having hair loss, but I knew already that thinning hair can affect men and women of any age. Hair loss can happen for all sorts of reasons, for example, it can be related to diet, exercise, illness, stress, disease, or hereditary causes, like you mentioned in this post. Toppik is a hair building fiber treatment that may overcome it. Thanks a lot. .
Yes, the frontal hair loss is more as compared to other sides, but I can notice thin hair on sides and back too. Now, I can see my scalp easily when I comb, this shows that hair is thinning and falling from other sides too, I would say it’s androgenetic alopecia because I am losing hair from temples and the hair line is also receding. My scalp feels itchy from nearly 5 years and my hair fall problem started nearly 18 months ago…
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