It’s simple, really: the more you mess with your hair, the more damage you cause to your follicles. This truth was laid out in Dove Men+Care’s Hair Fall Study, which found that the over-styling and use of heated tools were incredibly damaging to hair. As it turns out, the solution to this problem is equally simple: don’t overdo it. At the most, you should only need to use heat on your hair once a week. To make your style last longer, it may be time to invest in a can of dry shampoo. And for more hair care tips, This is the Healthiest Way to Straighten Your Hair.

Minoxidil (Rogaine, generic versions). This drug was initially introduced as a treatment for high blood pressure, but people who took it noticed that they were growing hair in places where they had lost it. Research studies confirmed that minoxidil applied directly to the scalp could stimulate hair growth. As a result of the studies, the FDA originally approved over-the-counter 2% minoxidil to treat hair loss in women. Since then a 5% solution has also become available when a stronger solution is need for a woman's hair loss.
The directions say patients will see an improvement in hair growth in six weeks, but Dr. Mirmirani suggested trying it for six months before deciding whether it works or not. About a third of patients who use it see significant improvements, another third find it prevents hair loss from getting worse, and the remainder don’t see any effect, she said. 

Another sneaky culprit of hair loss is alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that confuses the hair for an attack on the immune system. According to Marc Glashofer, MD, a dermatologist in New York City, if your hair loss is occurring in round circles on your scalp, then you most likely are a victim of alopecia. Alopecia can be treated with steroids and even over-the-counter products like Rogaine.
Fair enough, I understand it. And I agree, some women love bald men. Guys like Jason Statham and Kelly Slater are heroes of mine and certainly don’t suffer in the romance department because of their lack of hair (Gisele Bundchen and Rosie Huntington-Whitely to name a few of their romances, and possibly two of the most beautiful women of earth.) However, losing hair at a younger age is clearly traumatic for some people, so this website is for them 🙂
Symptoms of hair loss include hair loss in patches usually in circular patterns, dandruff, skin lesions, and scarring. Alopecia areata (mild – medium level) usually shows in unusual hair loss areas, e.g., eyebrows, backside of the head or above the ears, areas the male pattern baldness usually does not affect. In male-pattern hair loss, loss and thinning begin at the temples and the crown and hair either thins out or falls out. Female-pattern hair loss occurs at the frontal and parietal.

(I.e. Hair Thinning Around Hairline and Crown) Hello, I am a 23yr old male. I have noticed my hair has thinned considerably at the crown, temples, and hairline. I have noticed shedding in the shower; a few hairs at a time when I shampoo. I wish to stop or correct this before it gets worse. I have no known allergies. My father is partly bald and his father was almost completely bald. My... READ MORE


When you think of hair loss, men usually come to mind. You don’t see a lot of women walking around with receding hairlines or shaved heads as a result of hair loss. However, nearly 40% of women experience some form of hair loss by age 60. This hair loss is usually triggered by every woman’s favorite period of life: menopause. Since it’s a lot less socially acceptable for women to show signs of hair loss, balding can be emotionally devastating for many women. 

Complete Belgravia's online consultation if you are unable to visit one of our London clinics. The questionnaire should take no more than 10 minutes to complete and will provide our hair loss specialists with all the information required to recommend an effective course of home-use treatment. For those who live in or around London, we always recommend a clinical consultation.
Before you start hormone replacement therapy, it's important to talk to your doctor about the possible risks and negative effects versus the benefits of HRT. If you're already at an increased risk for health conditions like heart disease, cancer, and blood clots, HRT may not be the best hair loss treatment for you. If you are prescribed HRT, it important to take the lowest doses that are effective, and to only take the drugs for the shortest amount of time needed to control symptoms.
Nutrition can play a part. If you're not eating a well-balanced diet or are severely dieting or anorexic, it will affect your hair. However, if it is nutritional, it will be a temporary hair loss. Return to a well-balanced diet and hair should return in 4 – 6 months. Supplements must be used with caution and women must understand that vitamins in excess, even those purported to help grow hair, can be detrimental and have an adverse affect. In this day and age, people are rarely deficient in the hair loss vitamins folic acid and biotin. There would be other symptoms beyond hair loss. A B-vitamin rich supplement can help grow hair, but it might not make more hair. I advise using any supplement with caution and eating vitamin-rich foods instead. And ALWAYS tell your physician the vitamins, herbs, and medications (over the counter and prescription) you are using.
Thanks for sharing this..actually i am suffering from this problem last 3 years. After reading your blog I get a solution to rescue from hair fall. I will definitely try it…Parijatak Ayurveda provides plans for a wide range of ailments, thus spreading the magic of this traditional mode of treatment to each one. Parijatak also provides treatment for Tips for hair loss. nowadays hair loss related problem gets more increased, so we have to care about that.
Localized or diffuse hair loss may also occur in cicatricial alopecia (lupus erythematosus, lichen plano pilaris, folliculitis decalvans, central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, postmenopausal frontal fibrosing alopecia, etc.). Tumours and skin outgrowths also induce localized baldness (sebaceous nevus, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma).
If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)
If you want shinier locks, use conditioner every time you wash. Bonus: Conditioner cuts down on friction and breakage when you brush your hair later. And did you know that you can use conditioner to wash your hair, sans shampoo? Since shampoo can be very harsh, it's a nice alternative once in awhile. Our experts in the Good Housekeeping Research Institute Beauty Labtried it and found that while conditioner may not do the deep cleaning most shampoos will, it will still leave your hair feeling and looking nice
My hair started thinning out . I saw my grandpa and my dad and thought, that won’t be me. It was pretty stressful and scary in my early 20’s but I found a ton of research with the help of this website I found. I wasn’t sure if Rogine was a good choice for me, then I saw the side effects and decided it definitely wasn’t. I hope you find some good advice with the website I did, Fullheadhelp.com, only $5, check it out.
Bunch of weakasses in the comment section, I literally started rocking a near bald look at around 16. All of a sudden girls talked to me more at school and got more looks for some reason. All you need is the confidence to rock a bald head, I’m 21 now and can tell my hairline is receiding but it doesn’t effect me at all, I like being bald, I look better that way, y’all need to grow some cojones
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Androgenic Alopecia: This affects both men and women, but is more common in men. This is also referred to as “male pattern baldness” and can affect men as early as their late teenage years or early twenties. Typically, this type of alopecia will produce a gradually receding hairline, which eventually results in loss or thinning of most of the hair on the scalp. This is the most common type of alopecia that causes early hair loss.

I am 33 yrs old and just recently in the last 3 months I’ve noticed progressive hair loss near my crown and parts and my hair gets really oily like one day after I shower in my crown area. there is male pattern baldness in my family on my Dad’s side but none of the females on his side are affected. I have had a lot of emotional stress lately. I am worried that I have female pattern hair loss and it will be progressive. Can this be reversed esp at this young age if I make sure I’m nutritionally well and control my stress?
One especially effective supplement has emerged in the last few years, and Fusco calls it “a real game changer.” It’s a multivitamin blend called Nutrafol for Men. (Fusco is not paid to endorse it.) She says they many of her patients have “seen regrowth, thicker hair and a healthier scalp after using it. It’s packed with botanical ingredients that help multiple causes of poor hair health, including hair loss from inflammation, stress, hormone imbalance, genetics, and environmental toxins.”
I took your quiz. Sadly, the answers I gave were as of my early 20s, when my hairline started receding and had that ‘M shape’. I receded to Norwood 3, but mysteriously, the receding stopped there. The only explanation I can think of is that I gave up junk food and started eating more fresh fruit and veggies and started regular running and hiking. I lost a lot of weight and felt great. Until my early 50s, when suddenly my hair began to rapidly recede and I developed a bald spot in back. I panicked, thinking that I might have a serious medical condition, since I had not changed my good living habits. My doctor reassured me that I was still very healthy. Next stop: hair restoration specialist. He informed me that I had male pattern baldness and would eventually go completely bald on top. To my surprise and delight, my wife was thrilled that I was going bald and begged me to just let nature take its course. She confessed to me that she had always secretly wished that I would someday go bald and was delighted that her wish was finally coming true. Reluctantly, I agreed to just let myself go bald. Two things amaze me: First, how fast I went bald (less than two years to go completely bald on top). It was as if I was making up for lost time. Secondly, the sudden change in my attitude. Whereas I was panicked my wife would hate it, now thanks largely to her encouragement, I couldn’t go bald fast enough. It was a huge turn of for my wife and me. She still loves to sneak up behind me while I’m relaxing watching TV news or sports and kiss me on top of my bald head. I haven’t just adjusted to being bald. I really love being bald and wouldn’t ever try to regrow my hair. Not at my age. I’m in my 70s and it is quite normal for someone my age to be bald. The information you email to me I will pass on to my two sons, who, like me, face the likelyhood that they will eventually go bald. They are in their mid 30s and their hairlines are beginning to recede a little at their temples. I chose to go bald. They don’t have to. Oh, a third thing amazes me: that there are women out there who prefer bald men to men with a full head of hair. Thank God I am married to one of those women.
Losing hair at such an early age is disastrous. 20 years old is a very young age for hair loss! The reasons, like you mentioned, might be hereditary, improper diet, not washing properly, etc. I’ve found that remedies like applying coconut oil, almond oil, and onion oil do help fight hair loss, along with Minixodil products, like Toppik Hair Regrowth Treatment.

Although it’s generally only prescribed as a last resort for menopausal symptoms, hormone replacement therapy is a common and very effective hair loss treatment for some women — as long as they are menopausal or post-menopausal and are not at higher risk for adverse effects from HRT. It's most often prescribed for women who have androgenetic alopecia, also called pattern baldness. Hormone replacement therapy has a number of benefits for both general health and symptom management, but also a number of side effects — which range from unpleasant to dangerous.
Every guy is at risk of losing his hair, some more quickly than others. It sucks. The follicle itself shrivels up and is rendered incapable of regrowing anything. This type of hair loss is called androgenetic alopecia, often referred to as male pattern baldness. (That's the permanent kind, not the temporary thing that happens sometimes due to stress.) This plays out in two ways: the thinning of each hair and the overall loss of density. But, in certain cases of alopecia, these losses are not truly “permanent.” At least, not right away. Sometimes, it can be slowed down or delayed.
Phytoestrogenic herbs, such as ginseng or black cohosh, contain estrogenic components produced by plants. These herbs, at first, do treat the underlying hormonal imbalance by introducing these plant-based estrogens into the body. However, as a result of adding outside hormones, a woman's body may become less capable of producing estrogen on its own. This causes a further decrease of the body's own hormone levels.
Androgens are male hormones, which are found in women as well as men, but to a lesser degree. Menopause causes androgen levels to increase, which can in turn trigger thinning of the hair on your scalp and can also cause extra facial and body hair. Androgens do not necessarily decrease your number of scalp hairs, but reduce their diameter and length. The result is a loss of volume or ‘body’. Your hair may not be falling out more, or failing to grow back - but the replacement hairs are weaker and finer.
Research is looking into connections between hair loss and other health issues. While there has been speculation about a connection between early-onset male pattern hair loss and heart disease, a review of articles from 1954 to 1999 found no conclusive connection between baldness and coronary artery disease. The dermatologists who conducted the review suggested further study was needed.[41]
Hormonal imbalance. Hair loss during menopause and perimenopause is common due to declining estrogen levels. As estrogen levels fall, the resulting imbalance between estrogen and testosterone can cause thinning hair on certain areas of the head that are sensitive to androgens, commonly referred to as male pattern baldness. The same imbalance can also contribute to unwanted hair growth on the chin and face.

Lack of sleep can push your body into a state of distress, which can actually halt hair growth. So, get some zzz’s and your hair will gladly thank you. According to Wellness Magazine, one out of every six Americans feel sleep-deprived. If your minimal sleep time is leaving you feeling exhausted, you can be sure that your hair follicles are feeling the same way.


Hair transplantation is usually carried out under local anaesthetic. A surgeon will move healthy hair from the back and sides of the head to areas of thinning. The procedure can take between four and eight hours, and additional sessions can be carried out to make hair even thicker. Transplanted hair falls out within a few weeks, but regrows permanently within months. Hair transplants, takes tiny plugs of skin, each which contains a few hairs, and implants the plugs into bald sections. The plugs are generally taken from the back or sides of the scalp. Several transplant sessions may be necessary.[33]
Research suggests that hair loss during menopause is caused by your female hormones declining, which in turn triggers the increased production of androgens (or male hormones). Androgens are the most common cause of hair loss in women, just like they are in men. Androgens can reduce the ability of your hair follicles, causing them to producer weaker hair until they eventually produce none at all. We call this type of hair loss androgentic alopecia or “female pattern baldness”.
Treatment of pattern hair loss may simply involve accepting the condition.[3] Interventions that can be tried include the medications minoxidil (or finasteride) and hair transplant surgery.[4][5] Alopecia areata may be treated by steroid injections in the affected area, but these need to be frequently repeated to be effective.[3] Hair loss is a common problem.[3] Pattern hair loss by age 50 affects about half of males and a quarter of females.[3] About 2% of people develop alopecia areata at some point in time.[3]

Nutrition can play a part. If you're not eating a well-balanced diet or are severely dieting or anorexic, it will affect your hair. However, if it is nutritional, it will be a temporary hair loss. Return to a well-balanced diet and hair should return in 4 – 6 months. Supplements must be used with caution and women must understand that vitamins in excess, even those purported to help grow hair, can be detrimental and have an adverse affect. In this day and age, people are rarely deficient in the hair loss vitamins folic acid and biotin. There would be other symptoms beyond hair loss. A B-vitamin rich supplement can help grow hair, but it might not make more hair. I advise using any supplement with caution and eating vitamin-rich foods instead. And ALWAYS tell your physician the vitamins, herbs, and medications (over the counter and prescription) you are using.
I personally love short hair on women, I cut my own hair very short a couple of times. But it's hard to shake off that feeling that somehow you've failed as a woman, because you don't have luscious flowing locks. The amount of times I've had guys ask me if I was a lesbian when I had short hair just illustrates the fact that we live in a world where people judge even your sexuality by what your hair looks like!
According to a study published in the International Journal of Aesthetic And Anti-Ageing Medicine, there’s a reason why pregnant women have the most glorious locks. The natural hair cyclegoes like this: every hair on your head grows for a total of 6 years, then goes through a rest phase that lasts for two to three months. However, during pregnancy, most of your hairs are in the resting phase, making your hair appear strong and healthy. So, many women experience postpartum hair loss as a result of this phase coming to an end. Unfortunately, there is no way to combat this form of hair loss, though it eventually subsides after a few months.
Side effects and concerns: Minoxidil is safe, but it can have unpleasant side effects even apart from the alcohol-related skin irritation. Sometimes the new hair differs in color and texture from surrounding hair. Another risk is hypertrichosis — excessive hair growth in the wrong places, such as the cheeks or forehead. (This problem is more likely with the stronger 5% solution.)
Follicles grow in cycles (growing – resting – falling out). Therefore, not all follicles grow at the same time and they have periods of rest. During the rest period the hair may remain in the follicle for some time or it may fall out. This cycle repeats itself for the whole of your life. It takes 8-12 weeks for a hair to grow from the base of the follicle to the surface of the skin. This means that if you remove a hair, you may have to wait 8-12 weeks for it to grow again. Hairs you see growing a few days later in the same area are from different follicles.
Beginning at perimenopause in their 40s, women may see the effects of menopause on hair, including thinning hair, dull, graying and hair loss. Experts previously thought hair loss due to menopause was caused by low estrogen levels. But new research shows that hair loss in older women is likely due to lower levels of both estrogen and progesterone, causing hair follicles to thin and hair to fall out.

Congenital triangular alopecia – It is a triangular, or oval in some cases, shaped patch of hair loss in the temple area of the scalp that occurs mostly in young children. The affected area mainly contains vellus hair follicles or no hair follicles at all, but it does not expand. Its causes are unknown, and although it is a permanent condition, it does not have any other effect on the affected individuals.[24]


If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)

I have been loosing hair for 3 years now. It started at the temples, but actually it falls from anywhere in the scalp. I notice that my hair is pretty thin and weak. I’ve changed my diet in the last month and a half, but it keeps falling almost the same. I have a pretty stressful life, but I’m not sure if that’s the only reason (because on non stressful periods of time, the falling is almost the same). The thing is that I notice that my scalp is almost always itchy, a lot of the hairs that falls, falls with a grease yellow or white bulb at the end. I have to wash my hair almost every day I read that it could be Telogen effluvium, but it has been falling for so long that I don’t think that it’s the reason… It is starting to be noticeable the lack of density, specially in the front. I should be more active as well, but even if I do exercise, I keep feeling that my hair is thin and breaks and falls easily… I would really like to regrow what I’ve lost, but my main focus right now is to stop the hair from falling. Do you think I could have some sort of skin condition that is making this happen? (I have visited 2 dermatologist but both said it was AGA without almost looking at my scalp). Or is this also possible in typical Male pattern baldness?
If you find yourself snacking at night before bed, it may be because you're bored or anxious — not truly hungry — and eating makes you feel better. Try eating a healthy dinner a bit later in the evening. If your stomach is truly growling before bed, try a protein-based snack like a hard-boiled egg or a slice of cheese. A few spoonfuls of yogurt or some fruit is another good option.  

When women have female pattern hair loss, the pattern of the shedding is completely different. While it is still located around the top of the head, it affects the vertex more diffusely, as opposed to being confined to defined areas. While thinning can certainly be significant, the chances of it forming noticeable bald areas are much less likely than with men. Instead, hair tends to look less voluminous than it once did, and the severity of the loss is recorded on something called the Ludwig Scale, which can be seen here.
×