Dietary supplements are not typically recommended.[30] There is only one small trial of saw palmetto which shows tentative benefit in those with mild to moderate androgenetic alopecia.[30] There is no evidence for biotin.[30] Evidence for most other produces is also insufficient.[37] There was no good evidence for gingko, aloe vera, ginseng, bergamot, hibiscus, or sorphora as of 2011.[37]
Hi Chase – We’re glad you enjoyed this blog post! Most of our products are cosmetic solutions to hair loss, but if you are looking for more natural remedies, our Hair Nutrition 2-in-1 Capsules contain biotin and keratin, and help strengthen, nourish, and repair the hair shaft. You can read more about the product here: http://www.toppik.com/shop/hair-nutrition-2-in-1-capsules.
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Chronic Telogen Effluvium, also known as Diffuse Hair Loss, is similar to temporary Telogen Effluvium in its causes, the main difference being that hair loss can be prolonged. The reason for this is that the underlying cause of the hair loss has not been dealt with. In order to treat Chronic TE effectively it is important not only to treat the condition with an optimum course of treatment, but also to look at the medical issues causing the problem.
Adjusting to permanent hair loss is challenging for most women. Menopausal hair loss can be upsetting and cause anxiety, but is not usually a sign of an underlying medical disorder, unless accompanied by other symptoms. Improving general and nutritional health may help slow loss. There are cosmetic options for improving the appearance of hair and medical treatments which, when used long term can improve hair growth. If you have other symptoms as well as your hair loss, seek the advice of your doctor.
There are also other visual cues that women can look for over time. Although men’s hair tends to recede from the forehead or the crown of the head, women tend to notice thinning on the top third to one half of the scalp. Sometimes their frontal line stays intact, says Nicole Rogers, MD, of Old Metairie Dermatology in Metairie, La. Women may see a part that is gradually becoming wider or see more of their scalp than normal when their hair is pulled back.

Hi David, I understand where you are coming from. Losing hair at a young age is not a nice experience. Luckily, there is a lot more you could be doing besides the shampoo. Honestly I don’t know how much this will help in the long term. To get you started, you’ll probably have to adjust a few things in your diet and lifestyle to stop further loss/ regrow lost areas. A simple thing to get started would be to use a dermaroller (or even better a dermastamp) along the hairline. Remember though, pattern baldness starts from the inside out. It’s basically a sign that your body is out of balance. So try to sort that out as well.


Similar to hitting the gym too often, restricting your diet in unhealthy ways can have severe consequences for your luscious locks. If you’re majorly restricting your daily calorie intake, this will slow down your metabolism and your bodily functions, including the growing cycle of your hair. Aside from that, your hair will be thirsty for those essential nutrients that it is no longer receiving. If you really must diet, start taking biotin supplements to maintain hair growth.
Hair Loss can be caused by both emotional and physical stresses such as a serious illness. It is possible that stress induces hormonal changes that are responsible for the hair loss. Genes play a vital role in hair loss , there are usually other reasons as well, including, hormonal imbalances, an under-active thyroid gland, nutritional deficiencies and insufficient blood circulation in the scalp. Hair loss is a mammoth problem that many people are suffering from.
The blame can't be blamed solely on your hair care habits, either—if there's baldness anywhere in your family tree, you're at risk. Unlike male-pattern baldness, though, where patches of hair fall out over time, female hair loss means a reduction in hair volume, making transplantation extremely difficult. "The total number of hairs doesn't always decrease, but the diameter of each strand shrinks," says Kingsley. And too-thin hairs won't grow past a certain length—which explains the baby fuzz around my hairline.
After struggling with her own severe menopause symptoms and doing years of research, Ellen resolved to share what she learned from experts and her own trial and error. Her goal was to replace the confusion, embarrassment, and symptoms millions of women go through–before, during, and after menopause–with the medically sound solutions she discovered. Her passion to become a “sister” and confidant to all women fueled Ellen’s first book, Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness. As a result of the overwhelming response from her burgeoning audiences and followers’ requests for empowering information they could trust, Ellen’s weekly blog, Menopause MondaysTM, was born.

If you find yourself snacking at night before bed, it may be because you're bored or anxious — not truly hungry — and eating makes you feel better. Try eating a healthy dinner a bit later in the evening. If your stomach is truly growling before bed, try a protein-based snack like a hard-boiled egg or a slice of cheese. A few spoonfuls of yogurt or some fruit is another good option. 
Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time.
Hypotrichosis is a condition of abnormal hair patterns, predominantly loss or reduction. It occurs, most frequently, by the growth of vellus hair in areas of the body that normally produce terminal hair. Typically, the individual's hair growth is normal after birth, but shortly thereafter the hair is shed and replaced with sparse, abnormal hair growth. The new hair is typically fine, short and brittle, and may lack pigmentation. Baldness may be present by the time the subject is 25 years old.[7]
Men often first notice hair loss on the temple area or on the hair line. Many refer to this as a "receding hair line." While this is not necessarily the beginning of progressive male pattern baldness, it can be distressing. It can also be very confusing sorting through hundreds of hair loss products and misinformation on the topic. Although it can be moderately challenging to regrow temple hair, it can be done and there is an additional permanent option if you are unsuccessful.
Loose anagen syndrome, which most commonly presents in young children, occurs when hair that is not firmly rooted in the follicle can be pulled out easily. Most of the time, hair falls out after it has reached an arbitrary maximum length. Children with loose anagen syndrome often cannot grow hair beyond a relatively short length. The condition more commonly affects girls with blond or brown hair.
Research suggests that hair loss during menopause is caused by your female hormones declining, which in turn triggers the increased production of androgens (or male hormones). Androgens are the most common cause of hair loss in women, just like they are in men. Androgens can reduce the ability of your hair follicles, causing them to producer weaker hair until they eventually produce none at all. We call this type of hair loss androgentic alopecia or “female pattern baldness”.
Hair loss induced by cancer chemotherapy has been reported to cause changes in self-concept and body image. Body image does not return to the previous state after regrowth of hair for a majority of patients. In such cases, patients have difficulties expressing their feelings (alexithymia) and may be more prone to avoiding family conflicts. Family therapy can help families to cope with these psychological problems if they arise.[12]
True. Hair loss can be hereditary. Hereditary hair loss is called androgenetic alopecia, or for males, male pattern baldness, and for females, female pattern baldness. Androgenetic alopecia occurs when a hair follicle sheds, and the hair that replaces it is thinner and finer than what was there previously. The hair follicles continue to shrink and eventually hair stops growing altogether. However, contrary to popular belief, hereditary hair loss is not only inherited from the maternal side – it can be passed down from either the mother’s or father’s genes – but is more likely to occur if both parents have this issue.
Anti-androgens. Androgens include testosterone and other "male" hormones, which can accelerate hair loss in women. Some women who don't respond to minoxidil may benefit from the addition of the anti-androgen drug spironolactone (Aldactone) for treatment of androgenic alopecia. This is especially true for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) because they tend to make excess androgens. Doctors will usually prescribe spironolactone together with an oral contraceptive for women of reproductive age. (A woman taking one of these drugs should not become pregnant because they can cause genital abnormalities in a male fetus.) Possible side effects include weight gain, loss of libido, depression, and fatigue.
Thank you, Ellen, for this great post; it is nice to know there are others who are experiencing the same (irritating!) things. I’ve had to deal with hair issues since my 20’s after having my thyroid removed, it is NOT fun having chunks of hair come out in the shower! My thyroid (I replace with desiccated pig thyroid – much better for me than synthetic) levels are fine, but I will look into my iron levels.
“There has been a lot of buzz about cloning hair follicles and then injecting them into the areas where someone is losing hair,” Fusco says. “I believe this is the next step and am very excited about it." She is also optimistic about a new technology that injects growth factors into the scalp and follicles in order to stimulate hair growth, as well as a low-level light therapy that uses laser therapy.
In men, finasteride (originally marketed as Proscar) is approved for hair loss associated with androgens. In one study, 62% of women also taking oral contraceptives containing the synthetic progestin drospirenone reported improvement. So it may be effective for female hair loss in the setting of increased androgen. But studies are limited and it is harmful to the male fetus so should not be used by women thinking about becoming pregnant or who are pregnant.
Reacting strongly to menopause hair loss can be seen as vanity – but it most definitely is not. Menopause hair loss can lead to depression, anxiety and low self esteem, but don’t worry you are not alone! If you can take the time to think about what you eat and whether you are getting enough vitamins and minerals into your diet along with a few housekeeping rules, you can help to alleviate this symptom.
your situation is very common and I assume you have had a thorough investigation ruling out any medical condition for your hair thinning. Minoxidil may restore some vellus hair but unlikely to result in significant terminal hair. As long as it is not getting worse, then a hair transplant procedure may be the answer for you to restore the feminine shape to your hairline 
Trichotillomania, classified as an “impulse control disorder,” causes people to compulsively pull their hair out. “It’s sort of like a tic, the person is constantly playing and pulling their hair,” says Dr. Glashofer says. Unfortunately, this constant playing and pulling can actually strip your head of its natural protection: hair. Trichotillomania often begins before the age of 17 and is four times as common in women as in men.
When your hair thins at an early age it can lead to anxiety, self-esteem issues, and lowered satisfaction when it come to your personal appearance. Initially, many guys try to overcome this by wearing a baseball cap or looking for over-the-counter hair thickening shampoos. Some brave souls will accept their genetic fate and go completely bald – but that look doesn’t always work for everyone.
Alopecia areata is an autoimmune disorder also known as "spot baldness" that can result in hair loss ranging from just one location (Alopecia areata monolocularis) to every hair on the entire body (Alopecia areata universalis). Although thought to be caused by hair follicles becoming dormant, what triggers alopecia areata is not known. In most cases the condition corrects itself, but it can also spread to the entire scalp (alopecia totalis) or to the entire body (alopecia universalis).
Tightly pulling back your hair in ponytails, cornrows or braids can lead to traction alopecia, characterized by hair breakage along the hairline and temples. Women athletes who often wear their hair pulled back are particularly at risk. A change in hairstyle usually helps; however, hair loss may be permanent if the tight styling techniques have been used too long.
There's a chance you're genetically predisposed to hair thinning, which means you may see a progressive, gradual reduction in hair volume. "In these instances, certain hair follicles are sensitive to male hormones – and this sensitivity causes follicles to gradually shrink and produce slightly finer and shorter hairs with each passing hair growth cycle." Explains Anabel.
An unhealthy scalp environment can play a significant role in hair thinning by contributing to miniaturization or causing damage.[citation needed] Air and water pollutants[citation needed], environmental toxins,[citation needed] conventional styling products and excessive amounts of sebum have the potential to build up on the scalp.[citation needed]. This debris can block hair follicles and cause their deterioration and consequent miniaturization of hair.[citation needed]. It can also physically restrict hair growth or damage the hair cuticle[citation needed], leading to hair that is weakened and easily broken off before its natural lifecycle has ended.[citation needed]
“That sounds totally exhausting and really expensive. Forty dollars for one month of shark pills? And what about those poor sharks? Blow-dry my hair to create volume — but don’t blow dry my hair ‘cause I’ll damage it? Use Rogaine every day for the rest of my life — what if I live to be 100? Do you how much that’s gonna cost me? Go on the pill? I feel like I just went off the pill! This is like a part-time job! Only I’m gonna need a part-time job to pay for it all! Forget it! You know what I’m doing? I’m getting a summer hat! I saw a really cute one when I was at the mall, but it was like $50, and I thought, that’s crazy, I’m not spending fifty bucks on a stupid straw hat! Now that seems like a total bargain to me! I’m just going to wear hats all the time! Wool hats in winter, straw hats in summer. It’ll be an investment I’ll make every couple years. Done! Thank you, Kelly, you have made me realize I don’t need to solve this problem, I just need to keep covering it up.”
In either sex, hair loss from androgenetic alopecia occurs because of a genetically determined shortening of anagen, a hair's growing phase, and a lengthening of the time between the shedding of a hair and the start of a new anagen phase. (See "Life cycle of a hair.") That means it takes longer for hair to start growing back after it is shed in the course of the normal growth cycle. The hair follicle itself also changes, shrinking and producing a shorter, thinner hair shaft — a process called "follicular miniaturization." As a result, thicker, pigmented, longer-lived "terminal" hairs are replaced by shorter, thinner, non-pigmented hairs called "vellus."
Turns out I may be on to something. Research shows that if scalp massages are done with essential oils, including lavender, cedarwood, thyme, and rosemary (the latter being especially effective), they do indeed stimulate hair growth. Of course, the nice thing is, we don’t need to embarrass ourselves by making crazy requests to fancy hair salons (although, if the salon is fancy enough, of course, no request will be seen as crazy); we can give scalp massages to ourselves. And if your sleeping partner doesn’t care, or if you sleep by yourself, then for an additional benefit, you can do what I sometimes do, which is rub rosemary oil with coconut oil into my scalp before bed, and then sleep with it in my hair/head all night.
Hair loss induced by cancer chemotherapy has been reported to cause changes in self-concept and body image. Body image does not return to the previous state after regrowth of hair for a majority of patients. In such cases, patients have difficulties expressing their feelings (alexithymia) and may be more prone to avoiding family conflicts. Family therapy can help families to cope with these psychological problems if they arise.[12]
Im a 20 year old male and since i was 18 ive always noticed ive had a slightly receded hairline starting to form. I figured it as normal and a "mature" hairline. However about a month ago one day I woke up, and literally clumps of my hair are falling out now and it is scaring me. I used to loose around 5-10 hairs a day... now im losing about 100 on normal days and 150 on days i wash my hair.... READ MORE
Sleep helps all our bodily functions and alow the body to build, repair and restore order. Have a calming bed-time routine such as a lavender bath, avoid stress and technology before bed and try to sleep in a darkened room if possible. Healthy sleep will help to rebalance hormones and nourish the adrenal glands which are the glands that produce stres hormones like cortisol.
Daily hair counts are normally done when the pull test is negative. It is done by counting the number of hairs lost. The hair from the first morning combing or during washing should be counted. The hair is collected in a clear plastic bag for 14 days. The strands are recorded. If the hair count is >100/day, it is considered abnormal except after shampooing, where hair counts will be up to 250 and be normal.[citation needed]
Hi Prithak, I wouldn’t focus too much on the number of hairs lost each day. Look at your hairline and hair thickness and see if it decreasing over time. At your age there is a lot you can do to keep your hair. For starters, I would recommend alkalising your body and removing foods that could cause you allergic reactions, leading to inflammation. Also make sure you don’t use any chemical shampoos or hot water on your hair. That’s a simple way to get started and protect your hair.
Younger men and women experiencing hair loss is not a good sign if one experiences such unwanted emotions will creep in and further damage will be incurred so deal matters well talk a hair doctor. Have a proper consultation and don’t make matters worst by self-medicating yourself. Getting treatment does not mean you’re weak but a good way to deal with the problem.
In men, finasteride (originally marketed as Proscar) is approved for hair loss associated with androgens. In one study, 62% of women also taking oral contraceptives containing the synthetic progestin drospirenone reported improvement. So it may be effective for female hair loss in the setting of increased androgen. But studies are limited and it is harmful to the male fetus so should not be used by women thinking about becoming pregnant or who are pregnant.
As for me, thanks to two years of regular treatment, I've finally reached the phase where regrowth is thicker every day. But the process has been arduous and pricey: Rogaine requires diligent use and $30 a month for the rest of my life. And some of my hormone-regulating prescriptions that I credit most for my good results—like Avodart, that cost upwards of $200 a month—are not covered because if you take them while pregnant, they can harm the fetus's development. But I continue with my regimen because, for me, the risk is worth the remedy—I'm not planning on pregnancy for a long, long time anyway. I also figure it'll be a lot easier to find a potential father with a full head of hair.

Harmful lifestyle plus sure kinds of medications otherwise diseases can lead to hormonal imbalance in men. This inequity might trigger extreme secretion of DHT hormone. Consequently hair begins to fall off in droves. Superior testosterone is linked to hair loss. If you have genetic hair loss, what you inherit is hair follicles which enclose a senior sensitivity to DHT that is a hormone collected of single kind of testosterone.


The association among food plus hair is simple. Hair is completed up of a protein call keratin. Therefore, it’s vital that you comprise enough protein in your diet. A low-protein diet orders your body to keep the accessible protein for extra purpose, like upgrading cells, therefore stingy hair of it. Green tea is valuable as it blocks out Dihydrotestosterone (DHT), the hormone which causes hair loss.
Hi David, I understand where you are coming from. Losing hair at a young age is not a nice experience. Luckily, there is a lot more you could be doing besides the shampoo. Honestly I don’t know how much this will help in the long term. To get you started, you’ll probably have to adjust a few things in your diet and lifestyle to stop further loss/ regrow lost areas. A simple thing to get started would be to use a dermaroller (or even better a dermastamp) along the hairline. Remember though, pattern baldness starts from the inside out. It’s basically a sign that your body is out of balance. So try to sort that out as well.
Daily hair counts are normally done when the pull test is negative. It is done by counting the number of hairs lost. The hair from the first morning combing or during washing should be counted. The hair is collected in a clear plastic bag for 14 days. The strands are recorded. If the hair count is >100/day, it is considered abnormal except after shampooing, where hair counts will be up to 250 and be normal.[citation needed]
Androgens are male hormones, which are found in women as well as men, but to a lesser degree. Menopause causes androgen levels to increase, which can in turn trigger thinning of the hair on your scalp and can also cause extra facial and body hair. Androgens do not necessarily decrease your number of scalp hairs, but reduce their diameter and length. The result is a loss of volume or ‘body’. Your hair may not be falling out more, or failing to grow back - but the replacement hairs are weaker and finer.
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