Guys are indeed losing hair earlier than their fathers. Four trichologists who spoke to the Times of India say while it’s normal to lose 50 to 100 hairs a day, more than that could indicate a health issue. Consider that the body typically sheds hair in response to extreme mental or physical stress, with hair loss that shows up several months after the event.
In other words, no one’s truly safe from the condition. But even in the face of these seemingly insurmountable odds, not all hope is lost for your precious locks. To show your hair some TLC (and prevent further thinning), look out for these surprising culprits—and combat them accordingly. And if you need a quick way to mask any thinning hair, just check out the 15 Best Haircuts for Looking Instantly Younger.
Hi Will. I have a question regarding on my hair loss problem. Currently, I’m still on my 19 but I already have that M-shaped on my hairline which is really absurd and devastating for me. I met a doctor one month ago and he prescribed me with ketoconazole shampoo. The result is quite impressive as my hair didn’t feel itchy anymore. The thing is, the hair on my hairline is still not growing as much as the other parts of my head but the fine hair didn’t fall out. Is it going to be like that or is there anything that I should consider to make it grow back?
A medical event or condition, such as a thyroid imbalance, childbirth, surgery, or a fever, typically triggers this type of hair loss. Telogen effluvium may also occur as a result of a vitamin or mineral deficiency—iron deficiency is a common cause of hair loss in women—or the use of certain medications, such as isotretinoin, prescribed for acne, or warfarin, a blood thinner. Starting or stopping oral contraceptives (birth control pills) may also cause this type of hair loss.
Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time.

A hair follicle needs energy to grow. Coenzyme Q10, found in whole grains, fish and meat, boosts the scalp’s ability to produce energy, especially in a cell’s mitochondria or energy factory. Stress causes oxidation, harming Coenzyme Q10 among other anti-oxidants, thereby accelerating hair fall. High stress has become the most common cause of numerous problems. Trichologists and hair experts agree that stress triggers problems such as alopecia areata, telogen effluvium and trichotillomania that lead to balding. The silver lining is that balding caused due to stress can be reduced by adopting stress management techniques.
For women going through menopause, the cause of hair loss is almost always related to hormonal changes. However, there are many other factors that can contribute to hair loss during menopause. These include extremely high levels of stress, illness, or a lack of certain nutrients. Diagnostic blood tests that can help rule out other causes of hair loss include thyroid tests, and/or a complete blood count.

About one-third of women experience hair loss (alopecia) at some time in their lives; among postmenopausal women, as many as two-thirds suffer hair thinning or bald spots. Hair loss in women often has a greater impact than hair loss does on men w, because it's less socially acceptable for them. Alopecia can severely affect a woman's emotional well-being and quality of life.
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Losing hair at such an early age is disastrous. 20 years old is a very young age for hair loss! The reasons, like you mentioned, might be hereditary, improper diet, not washing properly, etc. I’ve found that remedies like applying coconut oil, almond oil, and onion oil do help fight hair loss, along with Minixodil products, like Toppik Hair Regrowth Treatment.
Chris Deoudes has been a fitness writer since 2006, with articles published at Bodybuilding.com and Avant Labs. He is certified as a personal trainer by the American Council on Exercise and as a performance sport nutrition specialist by the International Sports Sciences Association. He has a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice and business management from the University of Florida.

Tightly pulling back your hair in ponytails, cornrows or braids can lead to traction alopecia, characterized by hair breakage along the hairline and temples. Women athletes who often wear their hair pulled back are particularly at risk. A change in hairstyle usually helps; however, hair loss may be permanent if the tight styling techniques have been used too long.

One-fifth of men will experience significant hair loss by age of 20(!), and that percentage grows proportional to age. Bauman says that significant loss increases steadily with age: 30 percent will experience it in their 30s, 40 percent in 40s, and so on. “This math proves true for men into their 90s,” he says. “If you go unchecked but have maintained most of your hair by middle age, then your sensitivity to DHT is probably on the low side, meaning you have a slower rate of male pattern hair loss going on.”
However, both men and women are able to use the MHRA licensed and FDA-approved minoxidil – a dose-dependent drug which is applied topically to the scalp where needed to promote hair growth. Various formulations of high strength minoxidil are available for men and women and can form part of a targeted treatment course aimed at stopping shedding and encouraging regrowth.
Vigorous styling and hair treatments over the years can cause your hair to fall out. Examples of extreme styling include tight braids, hair weaves or corn rows as well as chemical relaxers to straighten your hair, hot-oil treatments or any kind of harsh chemical or high heat. Because these practices can actually affect the hair root, your hair might not grow back.
I posted some pictures because I am not sure if I am loosing my hair. I have recently noticed some thining in the front and back but I am not sure if I am really loosing my hair or if it recently has just been looking different. I also notice when I stroke my hand through it a lot of strands are easy to pull out. What can I do? Progaine? Rogaine? I am 22. Thanks! READ MORE
If there’s any one thing we’ve all suffer from time to time, it’s a bad hair day. But, for a large percentage of the population, these bad hair days are nothing compared to steadily losing your hair every day. According to the American Hair Loss Association, around two-thirds of men will begin to lose their hair by age 35. But even more surprising is this: of the 85 percent of the population that will eventually suffer hair loss by 50, women make up about half.
The VS model discussed her ongoing struggle with the disorder via Instagram saying, 'Mine started when I was around 15yo! It started with me pulling on my eyelashes and almost quick after it went to me pulling in my eyebrow hair! I no longer pull on my eyelashes and have been pulling on my eyebrows ever since! The episodes are worse under a lot of stress or when I'm not doing anything like watching tv or reading a book!'
Similar to hitting the gym too often, restricting your diet in unhealthy ways can have severe consequences for your luscious locks. If you’re majorly restricting your daily calorie intake, this will slow down your metabolism and your bodily functions, including the growing cycle of your hair. Aside from that, your hair will be thirsty for those essential nutrients that it is no longer receiving. If you really must diet, start taking biotin supplements to maintain hair growth.
Fusco says that there’s something called miniaturization happening at the follicular level when a hair falls out. “Miniaturization refers to the slow shrinking of the hair follicle and the diminution of the hair within, until eventually the follicle no longer exists,” she says. “The remaining tiny hair falls out and nothing grows back.” She says that this is often genetic and caused by a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is a byproduct of testosterone. DHT clings to the follicle and then slowly shrinks it. This most commonly happens at the temples, the crown, and the front of the head. (This is also why you don’t see guys losing their hair around the sides and back.)
There's a chance you're genetically predisposed to hair thinning, which means you may see a progressive, gradual reduction in hair volume. "In these instances, certain hair follicles are sensitive to male hormones – and this sensitivity causes follicles to gradually shrink and produce slightly finer and shorter hairs with each passing hair growth cycle." Explains Anabel.
Loose anagen syndrome, which most commonly presents in young children, occurs when hair that is not firmly rooted in the follicle can be pulled out easily. Most of the time, hair falls out after it has reached an arbitrary maximum length. Children with loose anagen syndrome often cannot grow hair beyond a relatively short length. The condition more commonly affects girls with blond or brown hair.
Nutrition can play a part. If you're not eating a well-balanced diet or are severely dieting or anorexic, it will affect your hair. However, if it is nutritional, it will be a temporary hair loss. Return to a well-balanced diet and hair should return in 4 – 6 months. Supplements must be used with caution and women must understand that vitamins in excess, even those purported to help grow hair, can be detrimental and have an adverse affect. In this day and age, people are rarely deficient in the hair loss vitamins folic acid and biotin. There would be other symptoms beyond hair loss. A B-vitamin rich supplement can help grow hair, but it might not make more hair. I advise using any supplement with caution and eating vitamin-rich foods instead. And ALWAYS tell your physician the vitamins, herbs, and medications (over the counter and prescription) you are using.
I'm a 19-year-old male. Six months ago, I noticed that my hair was falling out much quicker than it ever had before. I have always had pretty thin hair, but now it is thinner than ever, and my hairline has been receding very quickly. I have a feeling that i could have a case of telogen effluvium, considering the fact that I have been extremely stressed the last year and a half. When I pull a... READ MORE
I’m 23 years old and since I was 20 I realized I have a mild form of diffuse thinning hair (which by now, 3 years later has become a little bit worse). Ever since then I’ve been using Minoxidil being an on and off user due to the side effects I get, mostly dark circles under my eyes and bad facial skin. At the moment I m struggling finding the right dose, but the problem is that when I’m getting very good results I m also getting noticeable side effects and when I’m getting just small hair regrowth results I m also getting no side effects. The problem is that I’ve been looking for the past weeks for a solution to get good results and no side effects. I have finally found your website.
Chris Deoudes has been a fitness writer since 2006, with articles published at Bodybuilding.com and Avant Labs. He is certified as a personal trainer by the American Council on Exercise and as a performance sport nutrition specialist by the International Sports Sciences Association. He has a Bachelor of Arts in criminal justice and business management from the University of Florida.
The views expressed in this article intend to highlight alternative studies and induce conversation. They are the views of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of hims, and are for informational purposes only, even if and to the extent that this article features the advice of physicians and medical practitioners. This article is not, nor is it intended to be, a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment, and should never be relied upon for specific medical advice.
Fusco suggest other herbal botanical products if you don’t want to take finasteride. Ones that are considered active for hair growth include ginseng, pumpkin seed, zinc, vitamin B6, horse tail extract, rosemary, and chamomile. (Some as supplements, some topical.) “It has been suggested that one of these ingredients or a combination of them may activate follicle growth and improve the health of the scalp and hair,” she says.

Another of the key clues is a feeling that the hair is not as thick as usual – for instance when putting the hair into a ponytail, it may seem less dense. Although this may make it difficult for any obvious changes to be observed, many women intuitively know when something is different – and this would be a good time to see a hair loss expert to ascertain exactly what is going on.
Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
The day I started to lose my eyebrows was the day I lost all hope. I hit rock bottom. I couldn't get up in the mornings or show my face in public. It wasn't that I was crying every day, because I honestly didn't have the energy or even care enough to do that. I just felt totally flat. I couldn't see a way out of the big black hole and I'm not sure at that moment in time if I really cared enough about myself to even try. Alopecia is not only a physical condition but it massively affects your mental state as well. Depression is another thing people rarely speak about, but it's finally getting the media attention it so greatly deserves.
Is this a bigger issue for the current generation? (I'm 27, and it feels like so many of my friends suffer from this.) Is it a nutritional thing? That’s an excellent question and I don’t know the answer. 30 million women suffer from hair loss. That’s 1 in 4 before age 50 and 2 in 4 after age 50. We might be more hyper aware of hair loss at an earlier age now just as we are more hyper aware of a need for a facelift at earlier ages. Thing that we used to take for granted, we do not. Genetic hair loss will manifest itself in the 20s, if not sooner. The good news is that there are more things available to help than before. Will they work for everyone, no. However, topical minoxidil (Rogaine) is good for helping maintain what you have. So at the first sign of thinning hair, it’s not bad to use even if the hair loss is temporary.

If suffering from hair loss in their mid 20s, most people tend to opt for non-invasive hair loss prevention treatments, usually in the form of a lotion or tablet. Other options may include hair transplant, especially if it’s likely that the hair loss in mid 20s will be permanent, that is to say the hair loss is progressive and unrelenting. Hair transplants are a popular way to restore hair these days since the effects are completely natural-looking and involve hair restoration using hair from the patient’s own head. Hair transplant can be performed on both men and women and is only impossible if Alopecia Totalis has already occurred (complete hair loss through the death of the hair follicles).


Minoxidil (Rogaine, generic versions). This drug was initially introduced as a treatment for high blood pressure, but people who took it noticed that they were growing hair in places where they had lost it. Research studies confirmed that minoxidil applied directly to the scalp could stimulate hair growth. As a result of the studies, the FDA originally approved over-the-counter 2% minoxidil to treat hair loss in women. Since then a 5% solution has also become available when a stronger solution is need for a woman's hair loss.
Reacting strongly to menopause hair loss can be seen as vanity – but it most definitely is not. Menopause hair loss can lead to depression, anxiety and low self esteem, but don’t worry you are not alone! If you can take the time to think about what you eat and whether you are getting enough vitamins and minerals into your diet along with a few housekeeping rules, you can help to alleviate this symptom.
In other words, no one’s truly safe from the condition. But even in the face of these seemingly insurmountable odds, not all hope is lost for your precious locks. To show your hair some TLC (and prevent further thinning), look out for these surprising culprits—and combat them accordingly. And if you need a quick way to mask any thinning hair, just check out the 15 Best Haircuts for Looking Instantly Younger.

The main type of hair loss in women is the same as it is men. It's called androgenetic alopecia, or female (or male) pattern hair loss. In men, hair loss usually begins above the temples, and the receding hairline eventually forms a characteristic "M" shape; hair at the top of the head also thins, often progressing to baldness. In women, androgenetic alopecia begins with gradual thinning at the part line, followed by increasing diffuse hair loss radiating from the top of the head. A woman's hairline rarely recedes, and women rarely become bald.
Here's what I gleaned from my blood tests and research into hair loss at-large. Many various symptoms can causes hair shedding—as any cursory WebMD search can tell you, from stress to chemotherapy–but 90 percent of hair loss is genetic and needs to be treated with medication. It can also be a sign of a thyroid disorder, says endocrinologist, Dr. Emilia Liao, who diagnosed me with mild hypothyroidism.

Hair loss induced by cancer chemotherapy has been reported to cause changes in self-concept and body image. Body image does not return to the previous state after regrowth of hair for a majority of patients. In such cases, patients have difficulties expressing their feelings (alexithymia) and may be more prone to avoiding family conflicts. Family therapy can help families to cope with these psychological problems if they arise.[12]
Another method is to wear a hat or a hairpiece—a wig or toupee. The wig is a layer of artificial or natural hair made to resemble a typical hair style. In most cases the hair is artificial. Wigs vary widely in quality and cost. In the United States, the best wigs—those that look like real hair—cost up to tens of thousands of dollars. Organizations also collect individuals' donations of their own natural hair to be made into wigs for young cancer patients who have lost their hair due to chemotherapy or other cancer treatment in addition to any type of hair loss.

Going bald was one of the best things that ever happen to me. I thoroughly enjoyed finding hundreds of hairs on my pillow every morning and wads of hair clogging the shower drain. My wife loves it as much as I do and she loves kissing me on top of my smooth head. What a turn on! For me, male pattern baldness is a normal, natural inherited trait and not a disease in need of a cure. I have been bald for almost 20 years and I love it more than ever. Perhaps it’s because I lost hair later in life and married a woman who adores bald men like me.
Before you start hormone replacement therapy, it's important to talk to your doctor about the possible risks and negative effects versus the benefits of HRT. If you're already at an increased risk for health conditions like heart disease, cancer, and blood clots, HRT may not be the best hair loss treatment for you. If you are prescribed HRT, it important to take the lowest doses that are effective, and to only take the drugs for the shortest amount of time needed to control symptoms.
Reducing caffeine and alcohol consumption, exercising regularly, and practicing stress reduction techniques such as yoga or meditation can also help promote regenerative hair growth. Taking care to not pull or twist hair in destructive ways and avoiding other physical traumas such as harsh processing techniques or excessive heat in styling will also help to protect hair.

Hair loss often follows childbirth in the postpartum period without causing baldness. In this situation, the hair is actually thicker during pregnancy owing to increased circulating oestrogens. Approximately three months after giving birth (typically between 2 and 5 months), oestrogen levels drop and hair loss occurs, often particularly noticeably around the hairline and temple area. Hair typically grows back normally and treatment is not indicated.[21][22]A similar situation occurs in women taking the fertility-stimulating drug clomiphene.

The usual cause for hair loss in women at midlife is due to shifting and reducing hormone levels at menopause. Falling oestrogen and progesterone levels - the biggest hormone changes at menopause - can cause some women to notice that their hair becomes weaker and thinner and grows more slowly. The other hormone shift at midlife can be a dominance of androgens especially testosterone which can cause hair follicles to shrink but can also result in the appearance of unwanted hair - espcially on the face. It's a tricky business this menopause rebalance! Another form of hairloss experienced is loss of eyebrows which is also caused by hormones but the culprit here is usually thryoid.
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