I am a 22 year old female and the hair on my head is rapidly falling out. You can clearly see my scalp throughout the top. I saw my dermatologist and she recommended I use the men's rogaine solution. I am concerned that it will not work for me and that I risk loosing more hair (Which i can not afford). I am very concerned and this situation is detrimental to my self esteem. Please help. I feel... READ MORE

It’s simple, really: the more you mess with your hair, the more damage you cause to your follicles. This truth was laid out in Dove Men+Care’s Hair Fall Study, which found that the over-styling and use of heated tools were incredibly damaging to hair. As it turns out, the solution to this problem is equally simple: don’t overdo it. At the most, you should only need to use heat on your hair once a week. To make your style last longer, it may be time to invest in a can of dry shampoo. And for more hair care tips, This is the Healthiest Way to Straighten Your Hair.

Stress: It’s no secret that stress can cause hair loss and an increase in the stress hormone cortisol may make you more likely to suffer from conditions like telogen effluvium, which causes more hairs than normal to fall out, or trichotillomania, a psychological condition in which a person pulls out their hair, like as a nervous (or stress-induced) habit.


According to psychologist Dr. Ana Fonseca, “For women, self-esteem and self-concept are the reflex of social influence, which can act as a source of conflict and misfit, with repercussions on body image and health. The relationship with the hair often includes anxiety about its general condition, if it’s thinning and falling out, or going gray. Hair is valued in connection with beauty and femininity, sexuality and attractiveness, so when losing it, people are affected negatively in their self-esteem and self-image. Hair loss threatens our vanity, how much we value ourselves and is usually seen as unattractive and often associated with being unwell or aging. It is recognized that there are also emotional factors associated with hair loss so it can mean psychological discomfort.”


After struggling with her own severe menopause symptoms and doing years of research, Ellen resolved to share what she learned from experts and her own trial and error. Her goal was to replace the confusion, embarrassment, and symptoms millions of women go through–before, during, and after menopause–with the medically sound solutions she discovered. Her passion to become a “sister” and confidant to all women fueled Ellen’s first book, Shmirshky: the pursuit of hormone happiness. As a result of the overwhelming response from her burgeoning audiences and followers’ requests for empowering information they could trust, Ellen’s weekly blog, Menopause MondaysTM, was born. 

Fusco says that there’s something called miniaturization happening at the follicular level when a hair falls out. “Miniaturization refers to the slow shrinking of the hair follicle and the diminution of the hair within, until eventually the follicle no longer exists,” she says. “The remaining tiny hair falls out and nothing grows back.” She says that this is often genetic and caused by a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is a byproduct of testosterone. DHT clings to the follicle and then slowly shrinks it. This most commonly happens at the temples, the crown, and the front of the head. (This is also why you don’t see guys losing their hair around the sides and back.)

Calling all gym fanatics—if you’re spending more time in the gym than you’re spending at home, it may be time to reevaluate your regimen. According to a study in the Annals of Dermatology, the more strenuous a participant’s workout routine was, the more likely they were to experience hair loss later in life. If you’re pumping iron more than a few hours a day, it’s going to affect your hairline. So, if you’d like to keep your hair, cutting a few hours of gym time every week may be the trick.


Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) restores post-menopausal oestrogen levels to average pre-menopausal levels. This reduces your risk of osteoporosis and alleviates menopausal symptoms, including hair thinning and/or loss. However, it is very important that you weigh the risks with the benefits. Studies have shown that HRT increases your chance of breast cancer, heart problems, mood swings, uterine cancer and endometriosis.
I've just had my second baby and the hair loss is always in the back of my mind. The shedding has started again and the areas that lost more hair before are still much thinner. People often think that hair loss is something you can put a cream on and you'll be cured but a lot of the time that's not the case. Sometimes, you just have to face that it's never going to grow back and deal with that.

When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”


Known as alopecia, hair loss occurs when hair follicles, or pores, either die or become slow in their ability to produce and push a protein called keratin through the follicle and, eventually, outside the skin. This often occurs naturally with age, although certain factors such as genetics, thyroid or hormonal conditions, side effects of medications, or other illnesses can affect hair cell production and growth. This often begins to appear as overall thinning or patchiness of the hair, or a recession of the hairline, usually starting at or around the temples.
Mine has definitely thinned, but I am absolutely not willing to take drugs for it, or for any of the relatively minor issues that I’ve experienced. Although I do know men who have had great experience with hair drugs. Still, I don’t like putting more stuff into my body if I don’t have to. I’d like better hair, but my self-image doesn’t depend on it.

Hair has deep psychological and sexual meaning. Both menopause and loss of hair are often associated with loss of femininity and sexuality. These thoughts and changes can all feed into each other, and it becomes a vicious and demoralising cycle. Rest assured, though, it is very rare for a woman to go bald. And things can be done to get the best out of your hair during this stressful time. 

Trich is under-researched in the UK, with the NHS pretty pushed for resources to try and treat it. I was referred to CBT (cognitive behavioural therapy) when I was 10, which just made me more anxious and depressed. Trying to identify Trich-triggers is incredibly difficult; they can be emotional, physical, situational and differ vastly between individuals. For me, currently it's mostly when I come up against confusing stuff in my PhD research; anxiety and stress also induce it.


Hi David, I understand where you are coming from. Losing hair at a young age is not a nice experience. Luckily, there is a lot more you could be doing besides the shampoo. Honestly I don’t know how much this will help in the long term. To get you started, you’ll probably have to adjust a few things in your diet and lifestyle to stop further loss/ regrow lost areas. A simple thing to get started would be to use a dermaroller (or even better a dermastamp) along the hairline. Remember though, pattern baldness starts from the inside out. It’s basically a sign that your body is out of balance. So try to sort that out as well.
Lifestyle changes, combined with alternative medicines, are a highly effective treatment option for most women suffering from menopausal hair loss. However, for some women, the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. Before beginning to take prescription medicine or getting surgery, a woman should consult a trusted medical professional to better understand the potential benefits and risks involved.
Men often first notice hair loss on the temple area or on the hair line. Many refer to this as a "receding hair line." While this is not necessarily the beginning of progressive male pattern baldness, it can be distressing. It can also be very confusing sorting through hundreds of hair loss products and misinformation on the topic. Although it can be moderately challenging to regrow temple hair, it can be done and there is an additional permanent option if you are unsuccessful.
What sometimes surprises women is that female pattern hair loss has the same cause as male pattern baldness: an inherited sensitivity to the testosterone-byproduct dihydrotestosterone (DHT). While men’s hair loss treatment for makes use of a clinically-proven drug named finasteride 1mg to block its production, this is not a suitable option for women.
Iron supplements. Iron deficiency could be a cause of hair loss in some women . Your doctor may test your blood iron level, particularly if you're a vegetarian, have a history of anemia, or have heavy menstrual bleeding. If you do have iron deficiency, you will need to take a supplement and it may stop your hair loss. However, if your iron level is normal, taking extra iron will only cause side effects, such as stomach upset and constipation.

One of the most common yet least talked about symptoms of menopause, hair loss can be devastating for the millions of women who suffer from it. Americans spend upwards of a billion dollars per year on hair loss treatments. According to the American Hair Loss Society, 99% of these treatments are unfortunately ineffective. Most women do not want to sit back and let their hair fall out slowly without taking action. Luckily, there are alternative solutions that are safe and effective for the multitudes of women experiencing hair loss.


Hair transplant are a well-liked way to reinstate hair these days as the effects are totally natural-looking plus involve hair return using hair from the patient’s own head. Hair transplant can be performing on both men plus women moreover are only not possible if Alopecia Totalis has previously occurred (total hair loss throughout the death of the hair follicles).
Thick hair and femininity are intrinsically linked. Cutting your hair off or shaving your head as a women is seen as a rebellious, daring move, or plain crazy (remember Britney's meltdown?). But think of all the attractive male celebrities with bald or shaved heads. Thinning hair is seen as a masculine trait, so when a woman suffers from it, it can make you feel less of a woman.
Follicles grow in cycles (growing – resting – falling out). Therefore, not all follicles grow at the same time and they have periods of rest. During the rest period the hair may remain in the follicle for some time or it may fall out. This cycle repeats itself for the whole of your life. It takes 8-12 weeks for a hair to grow from the base of the follicle to the surface of the skin. This means that if you remove a hair, you may have to wait 8-12 weeks for it to grow again. Hairs you see growing a few days later in the same area are from different follicles.
It’s important to keep your stress levels in check to prevent a hormonal imbalance. Reduced estrogen production can affect your brain chemistry and cause mood swings, anxiety, and depression. However, doing yoga and other breathing relaxation methods are especially effective in fighting menopausal symptoms. Exercising regularly can also help reduce stress.

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My age is 20 ... I have excessive hairloss for over an year... 2 years ago I had full head of hair... But now I notice that I'm going bald..!!! My father is also bald.. My uncles are bald too.... I know my hairfall is for family reason... I don't want to become bald.. What can I do??? Which type of treatment should I take ???? Plzz help... READ MORE
Hello Alex, I see no reason that those supplements would have made things worse. The only issue might be if the fish oil was oxidised before you consumed it, which can be common with some of the supplements (did you keep it in your fridge.) Anyway, even then I don’t think that could be the reason. Another possible answer is that the older (unhealthy) hairs are being replaced by healthier hairs, hence shedding. However, this probably isn’t the reason either. Your hair loss development is probably just continuing like normal with little affect from the supplements. Seeing a doctor might be a good idea as things will continue to get worse most likely. Please take a look at our Hair Equilibrium program and Grogenix product range. That’s probably how you’ll have most success getting your hair back.
Oral Medication: “In cases of androgenetic alopecia, finasteride is still the gold standard,” says Fusco. (Finasteride is the generic version of Propecia, which can be prescribed by your dermatologist and is also available via mail subscriptions.) Fusco says that even younger men can slow or delay hair loss by starting a daily finasteride prescription. “This medication works by inhibiting an enzyme that leads to hair loss,” she notes. “In clinical trials, 90 percent of the patients either gained hair or maintained their hair over a five-year period.”
Clearly, minoxidil is not a miracle drug. While it can produce some new growth of fine hair in some — not all — women, it can't restore the full density of the lost hair. It's not a quick fix, either for hair loss in women . You won't see results until you use the drug for at least two months. The effect often peaks at around four months, but it could take longer, so plan on a trial of six to 12 months. If minoxidil works for you, you'll need to keep using it to maintain those results. If you stop, you'll start to lose hair again.

Just because hair loss is a visible condition doesn’t mean that you’ll see it right away. In fact, people often don’t notice that they are experience hair loss until half of the process has occurred. It’s important to keep an eye on the following symptoms so that you can treat the condition as early as possible. The earlier you treat hair loss, the better your results will be. Here are a few common female hair loss symptoms:


You can also look at things like essential fatty acids. Fish oils or flaxseed oil can be wonderful for the hair, so worth adding into to your daily regime. Look at vitamins. Are you getting enough iron? Low iron, now, if you are approaching the menopause, and you are having a lot of heavy or prolonged or close together periods, you can end up with low iron and that can very quickly affect your health.  
I am 15 and I m shedding 30 hairs per day. My hair is good I would say, and back side is also not that bad. But hair keeps falling. WheneverI ran my head through the scalp I get 3 4 hairs. My mom doesn’t have that good hair, so does my maternal grand parents. But my father’s side have very good hair. Even my 60 y/o grandfather isn’t bald. What can I do help? Is it genetic?
Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT) restores post-menopausal oestrogen levels to average pre-menopausal levels. This reduces your risk of osteoporosis and alleviates menopausal symptoms, including hair thinning and/or loss. However, it is very important that you weigh the risks with the benefits. Studies have shown that HRT increases your chance of breast cancer, heart problems, mood swings, uterine cancer and endometriosis.
As for me, thanks to two years of regular treatment, I've finally reached the phase where regrowth is thicker every day. But the process has been arduous and pricey: Rogaine requires diligent use and $30 a month for the rest of my life. And some of my hormone-regulating prescriptions that I credit most for my good results—like Avodart, that cost upwards of $200 a month—are not covered because if you take them while pregnant, they can harm the fetus's development. But I continue with my regimen because, for me, the risk is worth the remedy—I'm not planning on pregnancy for a long, long time anyway. I also figure it'll be a lot easier to find a potential father with a full head of hair.

The data is inconclusive as to whether or not cortisone shots actually work at re-growing hair, but I do know one woman who gets them frequently and says they have really helped her. Cortisone shots are given at the scalp, and the Mayo Clinic suggests they should not be given more often than every six weeks. While I know of some women who have had luck with acupuncture for hair loss, the British Acupuncture Society states that there is no evidence that acupuncture can treat hair loss as a specific symptom; however, it might help with the underlying problem. (For example, acupuncture can help treat lupus, which can cause hair loss.)
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