A key aspect of hair loss with age is the aging of the hair follicle.[43] Ordinarily, hair follicle renewal is maintained by the stem cells associated with each follicle. Aging of the hair follicle appears to be primed by a sustained cellular response to the DNA damage that accumulates in renewing stem cells during aging.[44] This damage response involves the proteolysis of type XVII collagen by neutrophil elastase in response to the DNA damage in the hair follicle stem cells. Proteolysis of collagen leads to elimination of the damaged cells and then to terminal hair follicle miniaturization.

Here's what I gleaned from my blood tests and research into hair loss at-large. Many various symptoms can causes hair shedding—as any cursory WebMD search can tell you, from stress to chemotherapy–but 90 percent of hair loss is genetic and needs to be treated with medication. It can also be a sign of a thyroid disorder, says endocrinologist, Dr. Emilia Liao, who diagnosed me with mild hypothyroidism.


Going bald was one of the best things that ever happen to me. I thoroughly enjoyed finding hundreds of hairs on my pillow every morning and wads of hair clogging the shower drain. My wife loves it as much as I do and she loves kissing me on top of my smooth head. What a turn on! For me, male pattern baldness is a normal, natural inherited trait and not a disease in need of a cure. I have been bald for almost 20 years and I love it more than ever. Perhaps it’s because I lost hair later in life and married a woman who adores bald men like me.
Yes. Doctors use the Savin scale. It ranges from normal hair density to a bald crown, which is rare. The scale helps document female pattern baldness, a condition your doctor might call androgenic alopecia. You probably know it as male pattern baldness, but it affects about 30 million American women. Experts think genes and aging play a role, along with the hormonal changes of menopause. Your hair could thin all over, with the greatest loss along the center of the scalp. 
Before you venture into the confusing world of Internet hair loss advice, you should first pay a visit to a hair loss specialist. The doctor will sit down with you and discuss your family and medical history, then take a look at your hair loss and make a recommendation. The doctor might recommend one of the following treatment options for young males who are experiencing hair loss:
What to do: Once chemotherapy is stopped, your hair will grow back although often it will come back with a different texture (perhaps curly when before it was straight) or a different color. Researchers are working on more targeted drugs to treat cancer, ones that would bypass this and other side effects. In the meantime, Here's How to Deal With Thinning Hair During Chemo.

Trichotillomania, or hair-pulling disorder, often afflicts those with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder or anxiety. According to the Mayo Clinic, anxiety attacks often result in hair-pulling episodes that can cause permanent hair loss for Trichotillomania sufferers. Those with the condition can benefit from habit reversal training, cognitive therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, and, in extreme cases, mood-stabilizing medication, like Prozac or Paxil.
When one researches hair loss, or asks perimenopausal or menopausal women how they treat their thinning hair, a couple of vitamins and supplements come up again and again: Biotin and Viviscal. Biotin is a B-vitamin that’s part of the B family. Deficiencies are rare, but many women take supplements because it seems to improve the condition of their hair and nails. And by “seems to improve,” I mean that if you go on Amazon.com and look up “Biotin” or “vitamins for hair, skin, and nails,” you will find a plethora of products with five-star reviews and phrases such as “life-changing” and “bald no more” and “Works!!!”
Fusco says that there’s something called miniaturization happening at the follicular level when a hair falls out. “Miniaturization refers to the slow shrinking of the hair follicle and the diminution of the hair within, until eventually the follicle no longer exists,” she says. “The remaining tiny hair falls out and nothing grows back.” She says that this is often genetic and caused by a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which is a byproduct of testosterone. DHT clings to the follicle and then slowly shrinks it. This most commonly happens at the temples, the crown, and the front of the head. (This is also why you don’t see guys losing their hair around the sides and back.)

The usual cause for hair loss in women at midlife is due to shifting and reducing hormone levels at menopause. Falling oestrogen and progesterone levels - the biggest hormone changes at menopause - can cause some women to notice that their hair becomes weaker and thinner and grows more slowly. The other hormone shift at midlife can be a dominance of androgens especially testosterone which can cause hair follicles to shrink but can also result in the appearance of unwanted hair - espcially on the face. It's a tricky business this menopause rebalance! Another form of hairloss experienced is loss of eyebrows which is also caused by hormones but the culprit here is usually thryoid.

Lack of sleep can push your body into a state of distress, which can actually halt hair growth. So, get some zzz’s and your hair will gladly thank you. According to Wellness Magazine, one out of every six Americans feel sleep-deprived. If your minimal sleep time is leaving you feeling exhausted, you can be sure that your hair follicles are feeling the same way.
Less common causes of hair loss without inflammation or scarring include the pulling out of hair, certain medications including chemotherapy, HIV/AIDS, hypothyroidism, and malnutrition including iron deficiency.[2][3] Causes of hair loss that occurs with scarring or inflammation include fungal infection, lupus erythematosus, radiation therapy, and sarcoidosis.[2][3] Diagnosis of hair loss is partly based on the areas affected.[3]
Hormones are often not the only things to blame when it comes to female hair loss. Several factors can be at play. If female hair loss runs in your family, you may be more likely to experience hair loss during menopause. Other hormonal imbalances, nutritional or iron deficiencies, medication, illness, conditions (like thyroid disease and anemia), diets, and surgeries can also contribute to hair loss.
Start by getting good sleep, consistently. Cut back on smoking and drinking, both of which compromise the hair’s fiber production. Bauman says to avoid certain medications, like antihypertensives (which prevent high blood pressure complications), hormone treatments (such as thyroid or testosterone hormone replacement), statin drugs, mood modulators (like antidepressants and anti-anxiety agents), all of which that can hinder the hair’s growth and strength. And, as mentioned, avoid supplements like creatine, which will increase DHT production and thus accelerate loss.

After I had my first baby, I started getting post-partum hair shedding, which is totally normal. When you're pregnant you retain all your hair and it's shiny and thick and lovely, and then once you give birth it starts to shed. It can seem quite extreme because you haven't been shedding your hair naturally over time like you would when you're not pregnant, but it's totally normal.
Hair Loss Is a Treatable Condition -- Hair restoration physicians may recommend both pharmaceutical and lifestyle changes to women experiencing menopause-related hair-loss problems. Medical treatments that will help mitigate hair loss include a specially compounded prescription minoxidil solution, platelet-rich plasma injections (PRP, also called the "vampire hair growth treatment"), prostaglandin analogs, low-level laser therapy, off-label finasteride (for post-menopausal women only) and nutritional supplements. The best strategy is to use a multi-therapy approach and routine follow ups for tracking purposes to see what's working.

Stress can affect every aspect of your health in sneaky ways, and the thinning of your precious locks is but one. In this study published in the American Journal of Pathology, researchers found that stress can actually cause your hair cycle to be pushed into a common type of hair loss called telogen effluvium. At the peak of your stress, you can actually shock the hair cycle, repeatedly pushing it into the shedding phase. However, this type of hair loss doesn’t have to be permanent. Engaging in activities or practices that release these feelings of tension and worry can bring your hair back to a healthy routine—one that doesn’t clog your drain. To cool down and relax for good, bone up on these 32 Secrets of a Stress-Proof Life.
Yes, we’re all for the quick wash and rinse routine in the shower, but how much damage is this brevity doing to your hair? As it turns out, quite a bit. Aside from the leftover product residue, there are some of us who produce more Sebum, which naturally lubricates our skin. It’s what makes your shiny and greasy after a few days without a shampoo. If you’re a healthy adult experiencing hair loss, you can probably blame this occurrence on clogged hair follicles. The solution? Start using a clarifying shampoo two to three times a week. Be sure that the shampoo does not contain any conditioner, as this is the stuff that created the problem in the first place. And for more great hair care tips, check out the one haircut that will shave 10 years off your age.
Use a gentle hair brush, take advice on dyes and other chemicals, beware of hair extensions and extreme heat from straighteners or high intensity hair dryers which can weaken hair. If you're a swimmer, like myself, make sure to wet your hair under a shower with plain water before it comes in contact with chlorine - so that the water that is absorbed by your hair first is not chlorinated. Wear and cap and use gentle, natural shampoo and conditioner after swimming. 

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

I am 18 year old male and have been experiencing hairfall since i am 16 years old.More than 60 hairs shed everyday and I have formed a typical m shape.The hair is falling from all over the scalp and become thin from all over the scalp.Also if I don’t shampoo my hair for one or two days, excessive oil comes in my hair.I am also shedding hair from the sideburns.Also my eyebrow,eyelashes and public hair are falling.Is this male pattern baldness.
Hair grows in three different cycles: anagen, catagen, and telogen. About 90% of the hair on the head is in the anagen, or growth phase, which lasts anywhere from two to eight years. The catagen, or transition phase, typically lasts 2-3 weeks, during which the hair follicle shrinks. During the telogen cycle, which lasts around two to four months, the hair rests.
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