If follicles receive the necessary stimulus and nutrients from the body, it can stabilize hair loss during menopause and strengthen existing hair growth. This is why it’s important to nourish thinning hair follicles with the right nutrients, including marine extracts, vitamins (including B vitamins such as Biotin and Niacin) and minerals (such as Zinc), to promote hair growth during menopause. A good diet, as well as a nourishing shampoo and conditioner that is gentle on dry, aging hair, are top tips for how to treat menopause-related hair loss.
Reducing caffeine and alcohol consumption, exercising regularly, and practicing stress reduction techniques such as yoga or meditation can also help promote regenerative hair growth. Taking care to not pull or twist hair in destructive ways and avoiding other physical traumas such as harsh processing techniques or excessive heat in styling will also help to protect hair.
If any of the above scares you because you recognize the symptoms, don't fret. The key to successful regrowth? First, admit you have a problem. Each day you dwell in denial, you're losing precious time. The more hair you've lost, the less likely it is to all grow back. Telltale signs, like a wider part or a smaller ponytail, don't show up until you've lost nearly half your hair! Seek out trichologists and dermatologists or endocrinologists who specialize in hair problems. (A good place to start is the American Hair Loss Association.)
When you think of hair loss, men usually come to mind. You don’t see a lot of women walking around with receding hairlines or shaved heads as a result of hair loss. However, nearly 40% of women experience some form of hair loss by age 60. This hair loss is usually triggered by every woman’s favorite period of life: menopause. Since it’s a lot less socially acceptable for women to show signs of hair loss, balding can be emotionally devastating for many women.
Another way to diagnose what the problem is just by looking and listening, Rogers says. She asks what a patient’s mother, aunts, or grandmothers look like - if they have similar, or greater amounts, of hair loss. Using magnification on the scalp can show if a woman’s follicles vary in size - with some thick and others thin. These are two telltale signs of female pattern hair loss, also called androgenetic alopecia.
Lifestyle changes, combined with alternative medicines, are a highly effective treatment option for most women suffering from menopausal hair loss. However, for some women, the symptoms will be so severe that a more drastic treatment is necessary. Before beginning to take prescription medicine or getting surgery, a woman should consult a trusted medical professional to better understand the potential benefits and risks involved.
Iron supplements. Iron deficiency could be a cause of hair loss in some women . Your doctor may test your blood iron level, particularly if you're a vegetarian, have a history of anemia, or have heavy menstrual bleeding. If you do have iron deficiency, you will need to take a supplement and it may stop your hair loss. However, if your iron level is normal, taking extra iron will only cause side effects, such as stomach upset and constipation.
As the name suggests, androgenetic alopecia involves the action of the hormones called androgens, which are essential for normal male sexual development and have other important functions in both sexes, including sex drive and regulation of hair growth. The condition may be inherited and involve several different genes. It can also result from an underlying endocrine condition, such as overproduction of androgen or an androgen-secreting tumor on the ovary, pituitary, or adrenal gland. In either case, the alopecia is likely related to increased androgen activity. But unlike androgenetic alopecia in men, in women the precise role of androgens is harder to determine. On the chance that an androgen-secreting tumor is involved, it's important to measure androgen levels in women with clear female pattern hair loss.
Prescription medications, while effective, can carry high risk and be incredibly expensive. The most common drug therapy for treating the 34 menopause symptoms in the U.S is hormone replacement therapy. This may be a quick and strong way to combat hormonal imbalance, but unfortunately, it entails serious side effects and increases the risk of blood clots and stroke, as the following study has shown.
When undergoing this therapy, the doctor will extract blood from you in the same way as if you were getting a blood test. Your blood is then placed in a centrifuge which separates out the red blood cells from the plasma -which contains the platelets. Once the plasma is extracted and concentrated, a small needle is used to inject it into the treatment area. Pain and potential side effects are minimal, and you can go back to your daily routine afterwards with no restrictions on driving or activities.
Stress is one of the major hair fall reasons. A hair follicle needs energy to grow. Coenzyme Q10, found in whole grains, fish and meat, boosts the scalp's ability to produce energy, especially in a cell's mitochondria or energy factory. Stress causes oxidation, harming Coenzyme Q10 among other anti-oxidants, thereby being one of the major contributors to the list of reasons for hair fall.

Another sneaky culprit of hair loss is alopecia areata, an autoimmune disease that confuses the hair for an attack on the immune system. According to Marc Glashofer, MD, a dermatologist in New York City, if your hair loss is occurring in round circles on your scalp, then you most likely are a victim of alopecia. Alopecia can be treated with steroids and even over-the-counter products like Rogaine.
I am 15 and I m shedding 30 hairs per day. My hair is good I would say, and back side is also not that bad. But hair keeps falling. WheneverI ran my head through the scalp I get 3 4 hairs. My mom doesn’t have that good hair, so does my maternal grand parents. But my father’s side have very good hair. Even my 60 y/o grandfather isn’t bald. What can I do help? Is it genetic?
Stress: It’s no secret that stress can cause hair loss and an increase in the stress hormone cortisol may make you more likely to suffer from conditions like telogen effluvium, which causes more hairs than normal to fall out, or trichotillomania, a psychological condition in which a person pulls out their hair, like as a nervous (or stress-induced) habit.

2.Omega-3 Fatty acids -Omega-3 is an essential fatty acid that plays an important role in the maintenance of the cardiovascular system and tissue maintenance. Omega-3 can be found in fish oil supplements. Fish oil supplements are extracted from food sources high in omega-3, and deliver two potent fatty acids for the body. These are docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA).Clinical studies have found that these omega-3 fatty acids can boost mental health, improving mental skills such as concentration, focus and memory. EPA and DHA can also help lower inflammation and reduce bad cholesterol, therefore reducing the risk of stroke and heart diseaseomega-3 fatty acids are extremely helpful for promoting healthy hair. Researchers publishing in Advances in Therapy analysed data collected from 30 women aged 38 to 67 years who had experienced hair loss. It was found that omega-3 significantly reduced hair loss in women.Other clinical studies found that lack of omega-3 can lead to opaque and dry looking hair which in turn can end in dandruff or an itchy scalp. Omega-3 contributes to lubricating hair follicles and so add elasticity and brightness to your hair.The best thing is that you’ll hardly struggle to eat an adequate amount of omega-3 in order to take advantage of its health-enhancing benefits. Two units of fatty fish alone provide the weekly recommended dose of DHA and EPA. The choice is vast: salmon, halibut, sardines, trout, catfish, cod, tuna and herring.Other dietary sources of omega-3 include nuts, flaxseed, shellfish, canola oil and eggs. An easy way to consume omega-3 is through fish oil supplements


This hormonal disorder that may cause women to have infrequent or prolonged menstrual cycles. According to the Mayo Clinic, at its worst, this syndrome causes the ovaries to develop small collections of fluids, called follicles. Another symptom that occurs in a percentage of these patients is hair loss, spurred on by the constant fluctuation in hormone levels. These symptoms can all be made more bearable with exercise and dieting.

Too Much “Hair Care”: Believe it or not, hair loss can be caused by “over caring” for your hair or by certain cosmetic procedures. Shampooing too often, applying heat or braiding your hair tightly can cause damage to the hair follicles. Another cause of hair loss includes chemical processes like dying, bleaching, or perms. Typically, this is not a reason for baldness, though, and the hair will grow back.


I found out I have PCOS (Polycystic ovary syndrome) coupled with insulin resistance, which were the causes of the hair loss. This was over 12 years ago and unfortunately for me not much was known about the condition, which affects so many women. All the GPs and specialists I saw were middle aged men, who were dismissive and often clueless about what was going on. I was told there was really not much to be done, and put on the pill which was supposed to balance things out. At one point I was even told not to worry over something as trivial as hair loss.
After I had my first baby, I started getting post-partum hair shedding, which is totally normal. When you're pregnant you retain all your hair and it's shiny and thick and lovely, and then once you give birth it starts to shed. It can seem quite extreme because you haven't been shedding your hair naturally over time like you would when you're not pregnant, but it's totally normal.
Thick, healthy hair is a sign of youth, good health, and beauty. It can be devastating to watch your hair fall out, not just because you might feel like you’re losing your younger self, but also because you may worry that something even more serious is going on with your body. As women, we understand that thinning hair or outright hair loss is more than just a cosmetic concern. Besides being so important to self-esteem, your hair is a reflection of your overall health picture — especially your thyroid health.
For female hair loss in mid 20s, the findings are much the same; that if pattern hair loss runs in the family, the daughters are most certainly at risk too.  The other reason for hair loss in younger women is usually attributed to hormonal fluctuations, the trichological effects of which however could just be temporary. Speaking to your doctor if you feel that hormones, or hormone treatment is a concern, is advised. Hair loss in the 20s female tends to be diffuse, with an overall thinning of the hair occurring before wider areas of hair loss on the crown, if it progresses that far.
Men often first notice hair loss on the temple area or on the hair line. Many refer to this as a "receding hair line." While this is not necessarily the beginning of progressive male pattern baldness, it can be distressing. It can also be very confusing sorting through hundreds of hair loss products and misinformation on the topic. Although it can be moderately challenging to regrow temple hair, it can be done and there is an additional permanent option if you are unsuccessful.
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